Hiragana Workbook

download Hiragana Workbook

If you can't read please download the document

  • date post

    27-Nov-2015
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    377
  • download

    143

Embed Size (px)

description

PuniPuni

Transcript of Hiragana Workbook

  • Table of Contents

    Hiragana Charts .................................................................. 12

    Stroke Order Practice ..................................................... 14

    Learning Japanese Words in Hiragana ................... 85

    Practicing Double Consonants ................................... 131

    Using Modified Syllables .............................................. 133

    Examples of Modified Syllables ............................... 139

    Exceptions and a Little Grammar ........................... 142

    Introduction ........................................................................... 3

  • Introduction There are 3 types of Japanese characters: hiragana, katakana, and kanji. The first two are called kana, and they are similar in that they are both sound-based characters.

    In addition, there is rmaji, which is Japanese that is written with the Latin alphabet. You dont really need to spend any time learning rmaji, since you already know it.

    Hiragana and katakana are the most simple and important characters to learn, which is why it is best to learn them first!

    Japanese sentences often contain a mix of hiragana, katakana, and kanji.

  • Hiragana

    Hiragana is probably the most important form of writing that you will learn. Hiragana is a syllabary, a sound-based form of writing. Most hiragana are made up of 2 English letters, but one sound or syllable (e.g. ka, ma, na).

    Generally hiragana is used for particles and the ends of verbs and adjectives, while kanji is used for stems of verbs and adjectives and nouns. However, you can use hiragana to write anything in Japanese.

  • Katakana

    Katakana, similar to hiragana, is a syllabary. Katakana is primarily used for words of foreign origin (words that come from English, Chinese, German, etc.).

    However, this is not a hard rule. There are other times when katakana is used, but 99% of the time you see katakana, it will be for foreign words.

    Japanese has a lot of foreign words, especially from English. Most Japanese billboards and magazines are full of Katakana.

  • Kanji

    Kanji, the oldest form of Japanese writing, has its origin in China. Unlike hiragana and katakana, kanji each carry a meaning with them rather than a sound.

    There are usually multiple ways to read the same kanji, making it difficult for beginners. However, sometimes one can guess the meaning of the kanji based on its parts.

  • Romaji

    Rmaji uses the Latin alphabet, making it so that even people who havent learned hiragana, katakana, or kanji can read and write in Japanese.

    However, only knowing rmaji can be very limiting. Rmaji can be helpful when you are first starting out, but since Japanese people dont really use it, it is important to learn how to read and write hiragana and katakana.

  • Furigana

    Furigana (AKA rubi) is small hiragana that is written above (for horizontal text) or next to (for vertical text) kanji to indicate the pronunciation.

    For people who know hiragana but do not know many kanji yet, furigana is a very helpful reading tool. You can frequently see furigana in childrens books and manga.

  • Pronunciation Guide There only 5 vowel sounds in Japanese, and they are always pronounced the same way! In this way, Japanese pronunciation is much easier than English!

    a as in Ah! Example: ame rain i as in Eek! Example: isu chair u as in Moo! Example: usagi rabbit e as in Hey! Example: enpitsu pencil o as in Oh! Example: ocha tea

    Long Vowels

    In this book, long vowels will be romanized in the following ways.

    aa ii ee ei

  • When two consonants are placed next to each other (double consonants, e.g. kk), there is a sort of pause before the consonant is pronounced. The best way to master this is to listen and repeat.

    Dont forget to listen to the audio that is included in this book and repeat it out loud to practice your pronunciation! Have fun!!

    Pronunciation Guide

  • Tips on how to get the most out of this workbook

    1. Listen to the audio to hear pronunciation and practice saying it!

    2. Print out and practice writing as many times as you want!

    3. Look at the charts as much as you need to! Eventually, you will not need to look.

    4. Expand your vocabulary as you learn to write!

    5. Ganbatte!! Do your best! If you keep on trying you will remember! Have fun!!

  • a i u e o k s shi t chi tsu n h fu m y r w n n

    a i u e og z ji d ji zu b p

    Hiragana Chart

    Hiragana Chart 2: Voiced Consonants

  • The following hiragana are simply modifications of the hiragana listed in the first two figures. They are pronounced as one syllable, and the , , or is written smaller than normal.Hiragana Chart 3: Modified Syllables

    ya yu yok s sha shu shoc cha chu chon h m r g j ja ju job p

  • a ai

  • i irukadolphin

  • u umiocean

  • e eigamovie

  • o oyoguto swim

  • ka kasaumbrella

  • ki kinokomushroom

  • ku kumabear

  • ke keshigomueraser

  • ko kenpark

  • sa sakuracherry blossom

  • shi shimaisland

  • su sushisushi

  • se sekaiworld

  • so sorasky

  • ta takooctopus

  • chi chizumap

  • tsu tsurifishing

  • te tehand

  • to toratiger

  • na natsusummer

  • ni nijirainbow

  • nu nuriecoloring book

  • ne nezumimouse

  • no noriseaweed

  • ha hachibees

  • hi hiyokochick

  • fu fsenballoons

  • he heyaroom

  • ho hoshistars

  • ma mangacomic book

  • mi mimiears

  • mu mushibugs

  • me meganeglasses

  • mo moriforest

  • ya yasaivegetables

  • yu yukisnow

  • yo yorunight

  • ra rakudacamel

  • ri ringoapple

  • ru rusubanhouse-sitting

  • re reizkorefrigerator

  • ro rsokucandles

  • wa wagashiJapanese sweets

  • o (wo) te o arauto wash ones hands

  • n denshatrain

  • ga gakkschool

  • gi gynymilk

  • gu gunmilitary

  • ge geishageisha

  • go gomitrash

  • za zabutoncushion

  • ji jitenshabicycle

  • zu suzumesparrow

  • ze zenzen

  • zo zelephant

  • da dangodango

  • ji hanajinosebleed

  • zu tsuzukuto continue

  • de denwatelephone

  • do donguriacorns

  • ba bakudanbomb

  • bi byinhospital

  • bu budgrapes

  • be bentboxed lunch

  • bo bonsaibonsai

  • pa panbread

  • pi piyopiyotweet tweet

  • pu purinpudding

  • pe penkipaint

  • po pokettopocket

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.

    akiFALL/AUTUMN

    aiLOVE

    ANTari ashi

    FOOT/LEG

    a

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.ishi

    STONE

    inuDOG

    irukaDOLPHIN

    isuCHAIR

    i

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.ushiCOW

    usagiRABBIT

    umiOCEAN

    umaHORSE

    u

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.ebiSHRIMP

    ePICTURE

    esaPET FOOD

    eigaMOVIE

    e

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.oyoguTO SWIM

    oniDEMON

    ochaTEA

    origamiORIGAMI

    o

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.kaeruFROG

    kaiSHELL

    kasaUMBRELLA

    gakkSCHOOL

    ka

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.kitsuneFOX

    kinokoMUSHROOM

    ginkBANK

    gyny

    MILK

    ki

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.kuruma

    CAR

    kumaBEAR

    kumoSPIDER

    gunMILITARY

    ku

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.ken

    SWORD

    keshigomuERASER

    keisatsuPOLICE

    geishaGEISHA

    ke

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.koiROMANTIC LOVE

    gomiGARBAGE

    gokiburiCOCKROACH

    kenPARK

    ko

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.sameSHARK

    sakuraCHERRY BLOSSOM

    zaisanFORTUNE

    zabutonCUSHION

    sa

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.shika

    DEER

    shimaISLAND

    jishoDICTIONARY

    jitenshaBICYCLE

    shi

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.suzume

    SPARROW

    suikaWATERMELON

    sumSUMO

    sushiSUSHI

    su

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.semiCICADA

    zenZEN

    zenzaiZENZAI

    sekaiWORLD

    se

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.soraSKY

    sobaSOBA

    zELEPHANT

    zsuiZSUI

    so

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.tako

    OCTOPUS

    taiyakiTAIYAKI

    dangoDANGO

    daikonDAIKON RADISH

    ta

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.chizu

    MAP

    chchoBUTTERFLY

    chikyEARTH

    hanajiNOSEBLEED

    chi

    * both and are pronounced ji, but in most cases, is used. is only used in a few specific cases.

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.tsuri

    FISHING

    tsumikiBLOCKS

    tsukueDESK

    tsuzukuTO CONTINUE

    tsu

    * both and are pronounced zu, but in most cases, is used. is only used in a few specific cases.

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4. denwaTELEPHONE

    deguchiEXIT

    teraTEMPLE

    teHAND

    te

  • 1.2.Examples: 3.

    4.tokeiCLOCK

    toriBIRD

    toraTIGER

    donguriACORNS