Happy Mother¢â‚¬â„¢s Day! at a few stories about this special...

Happy Mother¢â‚¬â„¢s Day! at a few stories about this special . 2020-05-08¢  Happy Mother¢â‚¬â„¢s Day! Today
download Happy Mother¢â‚¬â„¢s Day! at a few stories about this special . 2020-05-08¢  Happy Mother¢â‚¬â„¢s Day! Today

of 1

  • date post

    09-Aug-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    0
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Happy Mother¢â‚¬â„¢s Day! at a few stories about this special...

  • TheTandD.com

    with our new digital archives!

    Take a scroll through HISTORY

    TheTandD.com/archives

    149 Centre Street • P.O. Box 844 • Orangeburg, S.C. 29116-0844

    Gerald J. davis, attorney geralddavislaw.com

    AUTO-ACCIDENTS • CRIMINAL DEFENSE • PERSONAL INJURY • DUI & TRAFFIC

    THE DAVIS LAW FIRM, P.C.

    803•531•3888 • FAX (803) 531-3322 TheTandD.com

    Happy Mother’s Day! Today we take a look back at a few stories about this special holiday.

    1961 ~ Flowers are traditional Mother’s Day offering

    Why are flowers so identified with Mother’s Day? We owe part of the tradition to Miss Anna Jarvis. Through her efforts, Mother’s Day was observed in Philadelphia in 1 907. Miss Jarvis arranged a special Mother’s service in a church, requesting that those at- tending wear a white carnation. As the custom spread throughout the States celebrants stopped wearing flowers and starting giving them in the form of corsages and bouquets.

    1984 ~ Mother’s Day tradition appeals after 76 years

    It was conceived in Philadelphia. It was born in Grafton, West Virginia. It has been celebrated all over the world for nearly a half-century! Mother’s Day! A favorite National Holiday! So well observed that over 95 percent of your fellow Americans stop to pay

    a special tribute to mothers of our country on the one day of the year that is theirs alone.

    Mother’s Day was the idea of Ms. Anna Reeves Jarvis, an idea that was spawned by her love for her own moth- er, who had been transplanted from her native West Virginia to Philadelphia, where she passed away in 1906. Still grieving a year later, Ms. Jarvis, who never married and who never had chil- dren of her own, told a group of friends of her idea a day to honor her mother and all mothers with a day dedicated especially to them.

    With the help of John Wannamaker, the Philadelphia merchant-philanthro- pist, and other civic groups, Mother’s Day became a reality in 1908. It was in Grafton, West Virginia w here the first Mother’s Day sermon was delivered. Yet, by 1910, only two years later, the governor of West Virginia proclaimed Mother’s Day to be a state

    holiday. The idea caught hold, and fed on its own appeal. That’s why in 1913 a Joint Congressional Resolution made Mother’s Day a national holiday, to be observed by all the states, territories and dependencies of the United States.

    It was the good fortune of President Woodrow Wilson to issue the first Presidential Proclamation, designating Mother’s Day as the second Sunday of every May.

    2008 ~ Holiday is 100 Years Old – Mother’s Day has changed over years

    On this 100th anniversary of Mother’s Day, the woman credited with creating one of the world’s most celebrated holidays probably wouldn’t be pleased with all the flowers, candy or gifts.

    Ann Jarvis would want us to give mothers a white carnation – she felt it signified the purity of a mother’s love.

    According to the U.S. Census Bu- reau, there are 83 million mothers in the United Stated. More mothers now work out of the home and the number of single-mother households has tripled to more than 10 million since 1970.

    Jarvis’ devotion to and her fierce defense of Mother’s Day could be tied to the feeling that “a certain era was passing and mothers like her mother were becoming fewer.

    Jarvis became increasingly disturbed as the celebration turned into an excuse to sell greeting cards, candy, flowers and other items. She became known for scathing letters in which she would berate people who purchased greet- ing cards, saying they were too lazy to write personal letters “to the woman who has done more for you than anyone in the world.” Before she died in 1948, she protested at a Mother’s Day celebration in New York, and was arrested for disturbing the peace.