GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and Practice Semester 1,...

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  • Unit study package code: GRDE2027 Mode of study: Internal

    Tuition pattern summary: Note: For any specific variations to this tuition pattern and for precise information refer to the Learning Activities section.

    Lecture: 1 x 1 Hours Weekly Tutorial: 1 x 2 Hours Weekly

    This unit does not have a fieldwork component.

    Credit Value: 25.0

    Pre-requisite units: Nil

    Co-requisite units: Nil

    Anti-requisite units: Nil

    Result type: Grade/Mark

    Approved incidental fees: Information about approved incidental fees can be obtained from our website. Visit fees.curtin.edu.au/incidental_fees.cfm for details.

    Unit coordinator: Title: DrName: Toni WilkinsonPhone: +618 9266 7803Email: [email protected]: Building: 201 - Room: 461

    Teaching Staff: Name: Toni WilkinsonPhone: +618 9266 7803Email: [email protected]: Building: 201 - Room: 461

    Administrative contact: Name: Sarah Norman-BrownPhone: +618 9266 2281Email: [email protected]: Building: 202 - Room: 114

    Learning Management System: Blackboard (lms.curtin.edu.au)

    Unit Outline

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and Practice Semester 1, 2016

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 1 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

    http://fees.curtin.edu.au/incidental_fees.cfmhttp://lms.curtin.edu.au/

  • Acknowledgement of Country We respectfully acknowledge the Indigenous Elders, custodians, their descendants and kin of this land past and present.

    Syllabus GRDE2027 Photgraphy Contexts and Practice is an introductory photography unit that will acquaint students with the theory and practice of contemporary photography. This unit will equip students with an understanding of applied photographic production, the function of photography in the cultural realm and associated critical theory. In Photography Contexts and Practice, students will be required to develop photographic works that demonstrate a clear and disciplined engagement with the practical, aesthetical and theoretical imperatives of the photographic medium.

    Introduction Welcome to Photography Contexts and Practice.

    In this unit students will be expected to be active participants during tutorial discussions and class presentations and will also be encouraged to develop an impassioned perspective on the fascinating world of photography.

    Unit Learning Outcomes All graduates of Curtin University achieve a set of nine graduate attributes during their course of study. These tell an employer that, through your studies, you have acquired discipline knowledge and a range of other skills and attributes which employers say would be useful in a professional setting. Each unit in your course addresses the graduate attributes through a clearly identified set of learning outcomes. They form a vital part in the process referred to as assurance of learning. The learning outcomes tell you what you are expected to know, understand or be able to do in order to be successful in this unit. Each assessment for this unit is carefully designed to test your achievement of one or more of the unit learning outcomes. On successfully completing all of the assessments you will have achieved all of these learning outcomes.

    Your course has been designed so that on graduating we can say you will have achieved all of Curtin's Graduate Attributes through the assurance of learning process in each unit.

    Curtin's Graduate Attributes

    On successful completion of this unit students can: Graduate Attributes addressed1 Differentiate between global photographic techniques and practices

    2 Create and construct a series of photographic images in response to given briefs

    3 Convince an audience of your peers, as to the merit of your design solution, with

    sensitivity to cultural values

    Apply discipline knowledge Thinking skills (use analytical skills to solve problems)

    Information skills (confidence to investigate new ideas)

    Communication skills Technology skillsLearning how to learn (apply principles learnt to new situations) (confidence to tackle unfamiliar problems)

    International perspective (value the perspectives of others)

    Cultural understanding (value the perspectives of others)

    Professional Skills (work independently and as a team) (plan own work)

    Find out more about Curtin's Graduate attributes at the Office of Teaching & Learning website: ctl.curtin.edu.au

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 2 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

    http://ctl.curtin.edu.au/

  • Learning Activities The tuition mode for Photography Contexts and Practice  consists of a weekly one hour lecture and a weekly two hour tutorial/workshop class. You are expected to attend and actively participate in the tutorial discussion and any group learning activities. It is also a requirement that you attend and present your project submissions during the assessment weeks specified in the unit outline, presenting your work to the class is important and helps to develop your ability to construct persuasive communication in regards to your own work.

    It is expected that students will keep a detailed work journal which is developed throughout the semester and documents all working notes, technical information, photographic inspiration and  research for this unit. The development of the work journal is a process which refines and extends your capacity for professional production and to works to increase your visual literacy skills.

    All four assignments will be assessed throughout the semester in designated tutorial weeks.  All folios must be complete and contain all four class projects. Incomplete submissions will be assessed as incomplete. All submissions should be contained in a professional standard portfolio.

    While there is a swathe of photography on the net you are strongly encouraged to engage with and research the photographers and photographs discussed in the weekly lectures. It is important that you become familiar with the canon of photographers  who have significantly impacted on the development of photography since its inception.

    Presentations

    Students are required to attend and present their photographic submissions to the class in each of the presentation weeks allocated. A five hundred word written rationale document that explicates the reasoning behind the photographs must also be submitted to the tutor at the end of the class presentation.

    Work Journal

    You must produce and maintain a work journal. Whilst the journal is not assessed as an individual component this journal will contain all your working notes, observations, and research compiled throughout this unit. If you prefer, this document can be assembled as a digital file saved to PDF. Moreover, be aware that research towards this unit must be ‘ongoing’ and recorded in the ‘work journal’. Likewise, research documenting is not a ‘retrospective’ activity, it is a process that needs to occur throughout your learning program.

    Submissions must be complete

    All  submissions must be complete. Incomplete submissions will be marked as incomplete.

    Digital photographic submissions

    All photographs must be submitted as digital prints on photographic paper and a digital jpeg file. Laser prints on standard photocopy paper are unacceptable.

    Back-up all digital files

    As a part of professional working practice, you must back-up all your digital files. The loss or corruption of data are not sufficient grounds for project extensions, you are advised to make multiple back-up copies of your files.

    Cameras and equipment

    Students undertaking this unit will require ‘access’ to a Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera.

    Digital manipulation

    As all digital cameras tend to have minor exposure and colour balance anomalies, your images will require some post-production manipulation. Indeed, it is expected that you will need to adjust your photographs appearance by altering their exposure, colour balance, composition, image alignment, etc. However, as this is a photographic program, digital manipulation must be kept to a minimum. As such, you are instructed to not use elaborate montage techniques or image filtration. These will not benefit your grasp of the medium.

    Digital printing facility and deadlines

    The Department maintains a digital printing facility in Rm.201.368. Whilst the printer units are generally in good working order from time-to-time they will – despite our best endeavors – break down. Therefore, it is recommended that you print your photographs well ahead of deadlines, certainly not on or the day before of a major submission.

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 3 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

  • Unit Materials

    You are responsible for sourcing and purchasing your own consumable materials towards this unit.

    Learning Resources Recommended texts

    You do not have to purchase the following textbooks but you may like to refer to them.

    l London, B., Stone., J. & Upton, J. (2011). Photography: (Tenth edition). London: Prentice Hall.    

    (ISBN/ISSN: Book cover View larger cover View a sample chapter Photography, 10/E Barbara London, Multimedia Learning John Upton Jim Stone, University of New Mexico ISBN-10: 0205711499 )

    Other resources

    Barthes, R. (2000). Camera Lucida. Great Britain: Vintage.

    Bate, B.(2009). Photography: the key concepts. Oxford: Berg.

    Bright. S. (2011). Art Photography Now. London: Thames & Hudson.

    Giblett, R. & Tolonen, J. (2012) Photography and Landscape. Bristol: Intellect

    Goldberg, V. (2005). Light Matters: writings on photography. New York: Aperture.

    Levi Strauss, D. (2003). Between the eyes: Essays on photography and politics. New York: Aperture.

    Howarth, S. & McLaren, S. (2010). Street photography Now. London: Thames & Hudson.

    Modrak, R. & Anthes, B. (2011). Reframing Photography: theory and practice. London & New York: Routledge.

    Panzer, M. & Caujolle, C. (2005). Things as they are: photojournalism in context since 1955. New York: Aperture.

    Shinkle, E. (2008). Fashion as photograph:viewing and reviewing images of fashion. London & New York: I.B. Tauris.

    Sontag, S. (1979). On photography. London: Penguin.

    Sturken, M & Cartwright, L (2001). Practices of looking: an introduction to visual culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Tagg, J. (1988). The Burden of Representation: Essays on Photographies and Histories. Amherst: 145 University of Massachusetts Press.

    Webster, F. (1980). The New Photography: responsibility in visual communication. London: John Calder.

    Wells, L. (2009). Photography: a critical introduction. L Wells (Ed.), London & New York: Routledge.

    Wells, L. (2011). Land Matters: Landscape photography, culture and identity. London & New York: I.B. Tauris.

     

    Other Readings and resources will be introduced throughout the weekly lecture series in addition to those listed above.

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 4 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

  • Assessment Assessment schedule

    Detailed information on assessment tasks

    1. Case Study: Narrative incorporating depth of field and motion 25%. Four A4 photographic prints to be submitted in a folio for assessment and verbally presented in Session 4 tutorial. Week Beginning March 21st. See Outilne for Assessment One on BB.

    2. Investigation: Portraiture  25%. Two A4 photographic prints to be submitted for assessment in a folio and verbally presented  in Session 7 tutorial. Week Beginning April 25th. See Outilne for Assessment Two on BB.

    3. Exercise: Still Life Project 15%. One  A4  photographic print to be submitted for assessment in a folio and verbally presented  in Session 9 tutorial. Week Beginning May 9th See Outilne for Assessment Three on BB.

    4. Portfolio: Genre Project 35%. Eight A4 photographic prints to be submitted for assessment in a folio and verbally presented  in Session 12 tutorial. Week Beginning May 30th. See Outilne for Assessment Four on BB.

    Pass requirements

    Students must achieve a combined mark of 50% to pass this unit.

    Fair assessment through moderation

    Task Value % Date DueUnit Learning Outcome(s)

    Assessed

    1

    Case Study 25 percent Week: Week 4 Session 4 Day: In your tutorial group Time: At commencement of the tutorial

    1,2,3

    2

    Investigation 25 percent Week: Week 9 Session 7 Day: In your designated tutorial group Time: At commencent of tutorial

    1,2,3

    3

    Exercise 15 percent Week: Week 11 Session 9 Day: In your designated tutorial group Time: At commencent of tutorial

    1,2,3

    4

    Portfolio 35 percent Week: Week 14 Session 12 Day: In your designated tutorial group Time: At commencent of tutorial

    1,2,3

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 5 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

  • Moderation describes a quality assurance process to ensure that assessments are appropriate to the learning outcomes, and that student work is evaluated consistently by assessors. Minimum standards for the moderation of assessment are described in the Assessment and Student Progression Manual, available from policies.curtin.edu.au/policies/teachingandlearning.cfm

    Late assessment policy

    This ensures that the requirements for submission of assignments and other work to be assessed are fair, transparent, equitable, and that penalties are consistently applied.

    1. All assessments students are required to submit will have a due date and time specified on this Unit Outline. 2. Students will be penalised by a deduction of ten percent per calendar day for a late assessment submission

    (eg a mark equivalent to 10% of the total allocated for the assessment will be deducted from the marked value for every day that the assessment is late). This means that an assessment worth 20 marks will have two marks deducted per calendar day late. Hence if it was handed in three calendar days late and given a mark of 16/20, the student would receive 10/20. An assessment more than seven calendar days overdue will not be marked and will receive a mark of 0.

    Assessment extension

    A student unable to complete an assessment task by/on the original published date/time (eg examinations, tests) or due date/time (eg assignments) must apply for an assessment extension using the Assessment Extension form (available from the Forms page at students.curtin.edu.au/administration/) as prescribed by the Academic Registrar. It is the responsibility of the student to demonstrate and provide evidence for exceptional circumstances beyond the student's control that prevent them from completing/submitting the assessment task.

    The student will be expected to lodge the form and supporting documentation with the unit coordinator before the assessment date/time or due date/time. An application may be accepted up to five working days after the date or due date of the assessment task where the student is able to provide an acceptable explanation as to why he or she was not able to submit the application prior to the assessment date. An application for an assessment extension will not be accepted after the date of the Board of Examiners' meeting.

    Deferred assessments

    If your results show that you have been granted a deferred assessment you should immediately check your OASIS email for details.

    Supplementary assessments

    Supplementary assessments are not available in this unit.

    Referencing style

    The referencing style for this unit is Chicago.

    More information can be found on this style from the Library web site: http://libguides.library.curtin.edu.au/referencing.

    Copyright © Curtin University. The course material for this unit is provided to you for your own research and study only. It is subject to copyright. It is a copyright infringement to make this material available on third party websites.

    Academic Integrity (including plagiarism and cheating) Any conduct by a student that is dishonest or unfair in connection with any academic work is considered to be academic misconduct. Plagiarism and cheating are serious offences that will be investigated and may result in penalties such as reduced or zero grades, annulled units or even termination from the course.

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 6 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

    http://policies.curtin.edu.au/policies/teachingandlearning.cfmhttp://students.curtin.edu.au/administration/http://libguides.library.curtin.edu.au/referencing

  • Plagiarism occurs when work or property of another person is presented as one's own, without appropriate acknowledgement or referencing. Submitting work which has been produced by someone else (e.g. allowing or contracting another person to do the work for which you claim authorship) is also plagiarism. Submitted work is subjected to a plagiarism detection process, which may include the use of text matching systems or interviews with students to determine authorship.

    Cheating includes (but is not limited to) asking or paying someone to complete an assessment task for you or any use of unauthorised materials or assistance during an examination or test.

    From Semester 1, 2016, all incoming coursework students are required to complete Curtin’s Academic Integrity Program (AIP). If a student does not pass the program by the end of their first study period of enrolment at Curtin, their marks will be withheld until they pass. More information about the AIP can be found at: https://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/students/AIP.cfm

    Refer to the Academic Integrity tab in Blackboard or academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au for more information, including student guidelines for avoiding plagiarism.

    Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Expectations Curtin students are expected to have reliable internet access in order to connect to OASIS email and learning systems such as Blackboard and Library Services.

    You may also require a computer or mobile device for preparing and submitting your work.

    For general ICT assistance, in the first instance please contact OASIS Student Support: oasisapps.curtin.edu.au/help/general/support.cfm

    For specific assistance with any of the items listed below, please contact The Learning Centre: life.curtin.edu.au/learning-support/learning_centre.htm

    l Using Blackboard, the I Drive and Back-Up files l Introduction to PowerPoint, Word and Excel

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 7 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

    https://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/students/AIP.cfmhttp://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/https://oasisapps.curtin.edu.au/help/general/support.cfmhttp://life.curtin.edu.au/learning-support/learning_centre.htm

  • Additional information

    Session Schedule Please Note: The sessions listed in this schedule refer to teaching weeks and do not take into account tuition free weeks, please refer to the program calendar in this unit outline for session and assessment submission dates.

    Students are expected to access weekly readings, engage with lecture content and attend tutorials prepared to discuss set material.

    Additional readings and viewing material may be circulated throughout the semester via blackboard announcements. 

    Session One Lecture: Photography as a mode of communication.

    Welcome to students,  introduction to the unit and a look at photography as a mode of communication in the cultural realm.

    Tutorial:

    Discuss Unit Outline and all 4 assessment tasks. Issue outline for Assessment 1:  Depth of field and motion to develop a narrative. Camera Raw; Raw processing; converting to tiffs and jpegs; file management.

    Readings:

    London, B., Stone., J. & Upton, J. (2011). Photography: (Tenth edition). London: Prentice Hall. Pp,155-158

    Sturken, M & Cartwright, L (2001). Practices of looking: an introduction to visual culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pp,11-43.

    Webster, F. (1980). The new photography: responsibility in visual communication. J.Calder: London. Pp,17-37

     

    Session Two Lecture: Camera Controls.

    How to use the manual functions on a DSLR to control photographic outcomes and factors which influence depth of field and motion capture: Aperture; Shutter and lens focal length. ISO and White Balance settings.

    Tutorial:

    Please bring a camera to class and a work journal entry which outlines ideas for Project 1

    Exposure control, an introduction to exposure basics: How  to determine correct exposure for a given scene using the cameras  in built reflected meter and the manual functions on a DSLR.

    Ways to develop a narrative or a particular theme using depth of field and motion. 

    Readings:

    Berger, J. & Mohr, J. (1982). Another Way of Telling. London: Writers and Readers. Pp,278-289.

    London, B., Stone., J. & Upton, J. (2011). Photography: (Tenth edition). London: Prentice Hall. Pp15,-34

    http://www.david-campbell.org/2010/11/18/photography-and-narrative/

     

    Session Three Lecture: The Principles of Light.

    Direction, degree of diffusion, colour temperature, available light and artificial light sources.

    Tutorial:

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 8 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

  • Introduction to the studios and light sources available in the facility. Introduction to continuous tungsten light sources; using reflectors, light meters, gray cards and loan kits.

    Discuss Assessment 1 progress.

    Please bring a camera to class

    Readings:

    London, B., Stone., J. & Upton, J. (2011). Photography: (Tenth edition). London: Prentice Hall. Pp,220-251

     

    Session Four Lecture: The Lens.

    Lens focal lengths, focus, influence on depth of field and perspective. Choosing the right lens.

    Tutorial: Student Presentations Assessment 1

    Students are required to verbally present their Project 1 assignment to the class and submit a 500 word written rationale along with their photographs to the tutor at the end of the tutorial.

    Issue Assessment 2 Outline: Portraiture.

    Readings:

    Modrak, R. & Anthes, B. (2011). Reframing Photography: theory and practice. London & New York: Routledge. Pp, 49-67

     

    Session Five Lecture: The Photographic Portrait.

    Rise of the photographic portrait: the portrayal of people. We explore the different types of portraiture, lighting techniques, performance, pose, placement and the predilections of the sitter .

    Tutorial:

    Discuss Assessment 2 Outline: Portraiture.

    Introduction to studio portraiture studio workshop. Lighting techniques: Butterfly; Rembrandt; Short and Broad; Three Point.

    Choosing a subject, backgrounds and locations and  home studio set-ups.

    Readings:

    Bate, B.(2009). Photography: the key concepts. Oxford: Berg. Pp,67-86

    Bright. S. (2005). Art Photography Now. London: Thames & Hudson. Pp,18-46.

    Hollywood Portraits class handout.

     

    Session Six Lecture:Still Life: The Tabletop image.

    The inanimate object in a controlled setting. Still life studies in art and advertising.

    Tutorial:

    Please bring two examples of portraiture on which you intend to use as a reference for Project 2.

    Issue Assessment 3: Still Life/ Tabletop.

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 9 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

  • Studio Workshop on the Photographic Still Life.

    Readings:

    Bate, B.(2009). Photography: the key concepts. Oxford: Berg.Pp,111-127

    Kingsley, H. (2012). Seduced by Art: photography past and Present. Great Britain: National Gallery Company Limited. Pp,132-160.

    Martineau, P. (2010). Still Life in Photography. Los Angeles: Getty Publications.

     

    Session Seven Lecture: Introduction to Genre in photography:

    Over the next five weeks we examine the conventions and production characteristics  of different photographic genres. We will also engage with the work of key photographers in each field and analyse the cultural implications of certain communicative modes of photography.

    Documentary photography.

    August Sander, The Becher’s and the Dusseldorf School of Photography, James Mollison, Andreas Gursky, Thomas Ruff, Stefan Ruiz, Cara Phillips.

    Martin Parr, Nan Goldin, Larry Sultan and more….

    Tutorial:

    Student Presentations Assessment 2

    Students are required to verbally present their Project 2 assignment to the class and submit a 500 word written rationale along with their photographs to the tutor at the end of the tutorial.

    Reiterate genre and discuss student interests.

     

    Readings:

    Bate, B.(2009). Photography: the key concepts. Oxford: Berg. Pp,3-5

    Goldberg, V. (2005). Light Matters: writings on photography. New York: Aperture. Pp,9-19.

    Wells, L. (2009). Photography: a critical introduction. L Wells (Ed.), London & New York: Pp,9-34.

     

    Session Eight Lecture: Fashion and Advertising Crossing the boundaries of art and commerce: we explore the ways that fashion photography creates consumer desire and how it functions in contemporary culture as a social and political barometer. We also examine the tensions that can reveal the body as a site of exploration, exploitation and expression and also look at representations of gender in fashion imagery.

    Nick Knight, Juergen Teller, Corinne Day, Steven Klein amongst others.

    Tutorial:

    Issue Portfolio 4: Genre Project. Students are required to choose two particular genres that they would like to draw from for this project. The student is expected to produce four mages for each genre, 8 images in total

    Readings:

    Shinkle, E. (2008). Fashion as photograph:viewing and reviewing images of fashion. London & New York: I.B. Tauris. Pp,1-

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 10 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

  • 14

     

    Session Nine Lecture: Narrative and Art Photography Telling stories.

    The interconnections between photography and cinema; subverting conventional notions of genre in Art photography.

    Jeff Wall, Gregory Crewdson, Cindy Sherman, Bronek Koska and Sophie Calle.

    Tutorial: Student Presentations Assessment 3

    Students are required to verbally present  assignment 3 to the class and submit a 500 word written rationale along with their photographs to the tutor at the end of the tutorial.

     

    Readings:

    Berger, J. & Mohr, J. (1982). Another Way of Telling. London: Writers and Readers. Pp, 278-289.

    Bright. S. (2005). Art Photography Now. London: Thames & Hudson. Pp, 76-106.

     

    Session Ten Lecture: Landscape and Urban Landscape. The objectives and conventions of landscape photography; The New Topographics;  Rebecca Solnit on landcape as porn; the Sublime in Landscape and the work of Ansel Adams and Australian Landscape photography. 

     

    Tutorial:

    Supervised studio access and consultation with tutor about Assessment  4 progress.

    It is expected that each student will be working towards their two chosen genre projects for  Assessment 4 in this tutorial.

    Readings:

    Giblett, R. & Tolonen, J. (2012) Photography and Landscape. Bristol: Intellect. Pp,185-197.

    Wells, L. (2011). Land Matters: Landscape photography, culture and identity. London & New York: I.B. Tauris.

     

     

    Session Eleven Lecture: Street Photography and Photojournalism. The differences between street photography and photojournalism: photojournalism as unmediated representations of reality?; the poetics of Street Photography; key moments in photojournalism and a look at the works of key photographers.

    “the world is exploding with moments”

    “Stare. It is the way to educate your eye, and more. Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop.

    Die knowing something. You are not here long.”

    Walker Evans.

    Tutorial:

    Discuss final submission.

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 11 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS

  • Screening: Looking for an Icon.

    Readings:

    Levi Strauss, D. (2003). Between the eyes: Essays on photography and politics. New York: Aperture .Pp,2-11.

    Howarth, S. & McLaren, S. (2010). Street photography Now. London: Thames & Hudson. Pp,7-15.

    Panzer, m. (2005). Things as they are: photojournalism in context, since 1955. New York: Aperture. Pp,8-34.

    Webster, F. (1980). The new photography: responsibility in visual communication. J.Calder: London. Pp,153-164.

     

    Session Twelve Lecture: Wrap.

    Introduction to Studio Processes and wrap of PCP.

    Tutorial:

    Student Presentations Assessment 4

    Students are required to verbally present  assignment 4 to the class and submit a 500 word written rationale along with their photographs to the tutor at the end of the tutorial.

     

     

    Awareness You must comply with these points at all times: 1). Always be aware of your circumstances and surroundings when taking photographs; never enter sites or locations that are restricted or could put you and your equipment at harm.

    2). Before taking a person’s photographic portrait you legally and morally obliged to gain their consent.

    3). Always act professionally and never trespass or damage property.

    4). Unless you have their parents or guardians written consent, do not acquire photographs of minors. A copy of this consent must be provided with your project submission.

    Very important notes regarding ethics, behavior and health and safety issues Be aware, as photography in and around churches and cemeteries can offend the beliefs of people who hold these places in esteem, you are instructed to not take photographs in and around them. If you wish to take images at these sites you must gain written permission from their clergy or caretakers. Likewise, places such as airports, train and bus stations, shopping malls, arcades, department stores, restaurants, hotels, night clubs, movie theatres, leisure centers, swimming pools and sporting facilities also require the consent of their management before any photographs can be taken. You are advised that unless you have permission to not acquire photographs in and around these places

     

    Recommended suppliers of photographic hardware and consumables, sales, service, repairs and pre-press Camera Electronics ……. 9328 4405 (fax 9227 6728) 230 Stirling Street, Perth - Sales, Service and Repairs.

    Churchills Colour Labs ……. 9381 9688. 288 Railway Parade, Leederville- Pro-lab and digital services

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 12 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

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  • Curtin University Book Shop ……. 9266 3469. Building 200, Bentley Campus Digital image processing through external provider

    Fitzgerald Photo Labs ....... 9328 3778.  350 Fitzgerald St, North Perth- Pro-lab and digital services

    Team Digital……. 9328 3377 268 Lord Street, Perth – Photographic equipment, digital imaging supplies

    Mirage ……. 9388 9333 88 Hay Street, Subiaco – Colour and Black/White printing and processing, digital printing and scanning

    PRA ……. 9225 4677 63 Newcastle Street, Perth – Photographic equipment, digital imaging supplies

     

    Please note that all images of people must be accompanied with a talent release form. In particular, images of minors under 18 years must be accompanied with parental permission on the model release form.

    Talent Release Form Study use only

     

    NOTE: This Release Form is for use towards Department of Design photographic project work only and is not to be used for any commercial purposes.

     

    In consideration of my engagement as a model, and for other good and valuable consideration herein acknowledged as received, upon the terms herein stated, I hereby grant ……..……………………. (Photographers Name) their representatives and assign, those for whom ……..………………….   (Photographers Name) are acting, and those acting with their authority and permission, the absolute right and permission to copyright and permission to copyright and use, re-use and publish, and republish photographic portraits or pictures of me or in which I may be included, in whole or in part, or composite or distorted in character or form, without restrictions as to changes or alterations, from time to time, in conjunction with my own or a fictitious name, or reproductions thereof in colour or otherwise made through any media at their studio or elsewhere for art, advertising, trade or any other purpose whatsoever.

     

    I also consent to the use of any printed matter in conjunction therewith.

     

    I hereby waive any right that I may have to inspect or approve the finished product or products or the advertising copy or printed matter that may be used in connection therewith or the use to which it may be applied.

     

    I hereby release, discharge and agree to save harmless ………………………….(Photographers Name) their legal representatives, or representatives, or assigns, and all persons acting under their permission or authority or those for whom they are acting from any liability by virtue of any blurring, distortion, alteration, optical illusion, or use in composite form, whether intentional or otherwise, that may occur, or be produced in the taking of said picture or in any subsequent processing thereof, as well as any publication thereof.

     

    I hereby warrant that I am of full age and. have every right to contract in my own name in the above regard. I state further that I have read the above authorisation, release and agreement, prior to its execution, and that I am fully familiar with the contents thereof.

     

     

    NAME:

    ADDRESS: N/A Not required for this exercise.

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

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  •  

    SIGNATURE:

    DATED:

    WITNESS: N/A Not required for this exercise.

     

     

    Plagiarism is taken very seriously at Curtin University. When submitting an assignment in this unit you are declaring that you have created all work, and that it has not been previously submitted for assessment for another unit or at another institution.  When including images or text not created by you /or not entirely created by you (as research or to provide context) you must; ·      Reference these images or texts using Chicago referencing. ·      Include in-text references. ·      Include a reference list at the end of the file/document.   Referencing is relevant to all forms of assessment including essays, process files/journals, art or design portfolios and/or reports.   It is a requirement of your enrolment that you refer to the Curtin University Academic Integrity website prior to submitting your work. http://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/students/   Failure to follow these guidelines and being found to be in breach of Curtin University’s Management of Plagiarism Policy will result in a penalty being applied to your assignment and/or your academic status. 

    Enrolment

    It is your responsibility to ensure that your enrolment is correct - you can check your enrolment through the eStudent option on OASIS, where you can also print an Enrolment Advice.

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

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  • Student Rights and Responsibilities It is the responsibility of every student to be aware of all relevant legislation, policies and procedures relating to their rights and responsibilities as a student. These include:

    l the Student Charter l the University's Guiding Ethical Principles l the University's policy and statements on plagiarism and academic integrity l copyright principles and responsibilities l the University's policies on appropriate use of software and computer facilities

    Information on all these things is available through the University's "Student Rights and Responsibilities" website at: students.curtin.edu.au/rights.

    Student Equity There are a number of factors that might disadvantage some students from participating in their studies or assessments to the best of their ability, under standard conditions. These factors may include a disability or medical condition (e.g. mental illness, chronic illness, physical or sensory disability, learning disability), significant family responsibilities, pregnancy, religious practices, living in a remote location or another reason. If you believe you may be unfairly disadvantaged on these or other grounds please contact Student Equity at [email protected] or go to http://eesj.curtin.edu.au/student_equity/index.cfm for more information

    You can also contact Counselling and Disability services: http://www.disability.curtin.edu.au or the Multi-faith services: http://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/about_multifaith_services.htm for further information.

    It is important to note that the staff of the university may not be able to meet your needs if they are not informed of your individual circumstances so please get in touch with the appropriate service if you require assistance. For general wellbeing concerns or advice please contact Curtin's Student Wellbeing Advisory Service at: http://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/student_wellbeing_service.htm

    Recent unit changes Students are encouraged to provide unit feedback through eVALUate, Curtin's online student feedback system. For more information about eVALUate, please refer to evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/.

    Recent changes to this unit include:

    Photography Contexts and Practice is a new version of Design Photography 271. This unit is updated on a continual basis taking into account feedback conveyed via eValuate; student feedback on this unit is welcome through eValuate.

    To view previous student feedback about this unit, search for the Unit Summary Report at https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/student/unit_search.cfm. See https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/dates.cfm to find out when you can eVALUate this unit.

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

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    http://students.curtin.edu.au/rights/mailto:[email protected]://eesj.curtin.edu.au/student_equity/index.cfmhttp://www.disability.curtin.edu.au/http://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/about_multifaith_services.htmhttp://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/student_wellbeing_service.htmhttp://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/index.cfmhttps://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/student/unit_search.cfmhttps://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/dates.cfm

  • Program calendar Program Calendar – Semester 1 2016

    Week Begin Date

    Lecture/

    Seminar

    Pre-readings Tutorial/Other Assessment Due

    Orientation 22 February

    Orientation Week

    1. 29 February

                                     Welcome: Intro to Photo C&P.

    Photography as a mode of communication

    For all weekly reading details Please see the

    Session Schedule in this document

    Discuss Unit Outline and all 4-assessment tasks. Issue outline for Assessment 1: Depth of field and motion to develop a narrative. Files and file management. Introduction to the facility

     

    2. 7 March Camera Controls   Please bring a camera to class and a work journal

    entry which outlines ideas for project 1.

    Making a print. Exposure Control.

     

    3. 14 March The Principles of Light                                      Please bring a camera to class.                                     Intro to studios and light sources.

     

     

    4. 21 March The Lens   Presentations in class: Narrative.

    Presentation Case Study 1.

    5. 28 March Tuition Free Week

    6. 4 April The Photographic Portrait                                      Issue and discuss Assessment 2.                                  Portraiture workshop; Lighting set ups.

     

     

    7. 11 April                                                 Still Life/Tabletop                                                        Tropes

      Please bring examples for Assessment 2. Issue Assessment 3. Still Life workshop.

     

     

    8. 18 April Tuition Free Week

    9. 25 April Introduction to Genre: Documentary photography.

      Presentations in class: Portraits

    Presentations Investigation 2.

    10. 2 May Fashion and Advertising   Issue Portfolio 4. Discuss Genre and identify potential

    choice of genre for Assessment 4.

     

    11. 9 May Narrative and Art Photography   Presentations in class: Still life.

    Presentation Exercise 3.

    12. 16 May Landscapes and Urban

      Individual consultations

     

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

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    Landscapes and studio access.

    13. 23 May Street and Photojournalism   Discuss final submission requirements

     

    14. 30 May Wrap. Intro to Studio Processes   Presentations in class: Genre

    Presentation Portfolio 4.

    15. 6 June Study Week

    16. 13 June Examinations

    17. 20 June Examinations

    Faculty of Humanities Department of Design

     

    GRDE2027 Photography Contexts and PracticeBentley Campus 19 Feb 2016 Department of Design, Faculty of Humanities

    Page: 17 of 17CRICOS Provider Code 00301J

    The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS