Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Spending Plan Guide

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    11-Dec-2016
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    214
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Spending Plan Guide

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Spending Plan Guide

State of California

Department of General Services

California 9-1-1 Emergency Communications Office

GIS Spending Plan Guide

STATE OF CALIFORNIA

GIS Spending Plan Guide

Department of General Services

California 9-1-1 Emergency Communications Office

INTRODUCTION

In accordance with Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Order 94102, the California 911 Emergency Communications Office (911 Office) has launched a project to implement wireless enhanced 911 services (wireless E911 Phases 1 and 2) for wireless telephone users throughout California. A major emphasis of this project is the redistribution of statewide wireless 911 call volumes to local public safety answering points (PSAPs) from the California Highway Patrol (CHP) communications centers that handle an overwhelming number of wireless 911 calls. A means to enhance the usefulness of wireless E911 data is the PSAPs use of a Geographic Information System (GIS). This document is prepared as a planning guide to help the PSAP Manager comprehend the world of GIS and how it may interface with 911 wireless and wireline call taking, as well as, assist PSAPs in requesting state 911 Office reimbursement.

what is gis?

A Geographical Information System (GIS) is an organized collection of computer hardware, software, geographic data, and personnel designed to efficiently capture, store, update, manipulate, analyze, and display all forms of geographically referenced information. Sometimes referred to as electronic mapping, it is that and much more. A GIS is an integrated database containing information about georeferenced spatial objects points, lines and polygons plus the software and hardware used by personnel to display and manipulate these objects. The application of GIS concepts and technology to particular issues or problems results in multiple layers of information systems including land, stream, and/or transportation.

PSAPs should not underestimate the complexity of acquiring an accurate GIS. This project will likely require a partnership of resources both inside and outside the PSAP, city, county, and surrounding communities.

GIS AND ENHANCED WIRELESS 911

GIS technologies and their successful integration in PSAP architectures are in continuous development. GIS applications can be developed to assist in identifying the location of enhanced wireless 911 (Wireless E911) callers in both Phase I and Phase II environments. The three phases of wireless 911 are summarized below to provide historical context.

Wireless 911, Phase 0

Phase 0 is not considered to be enhanced wireless 911 service, as it does not provide location data. Since the mid1980s, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) has answered Phase 0 wireless 911 calls, made from wireless phones, on 7digit telephone lines, without the benefit of automatic number identification (ANI) and automatic location identification (ALI). In January 2001, California law changed to allow for the routing of wireless 911 calls to local public safety answering points (PSAPs). A few months prior to the change of law, the State 911 Office launched a project to bring wireless E911 to all California PSAPs. This was in concert with a series of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) orders, commonly referred to as FCC Docket 94102, requiring wireless service providers to upgrade 911 service. Up until that time, the CHP had coordinated all aspects of wireless 911 in California, using the 7digit public switched telephone network (PSTN) to answer and transfer, when necessary, wireless Phase 0 calls to local agencies.

Wireless E911, Phase I

Wireless E911, Phase I, is the first phase of enhanced wireless 911 or Wireless E911. Wireless E911 currently uses much of the established wireline E911 infrastructure to deliver wireless calls to PSAPs on E911 trunks. FCC 94102 specifies that to be compliant with Phase I, wireless service providers (WSPs) must be able to deliver the callback number and the location of the cell tower and antenna that received the call. This applies to WSPs only for PSAPs that are ready and request the service. In January 2002 the San Francisco Consolidated Emergency Communications Center (SF CECC) became to first local PSAP in California to receive Phase I Wireless E911 calls directly. Many other PSAPs have since followed and are receiving both Phase I and Phase II wireless E911 service.

Wireless E911, Phase II

Wireless E911, Phase II, includes Phase I and requires that WSPs also be able to provide detailed caller location information to PSAPs within specified FCC accuracy standards. As with Phase I, this applies to WSPs only for PSAPs that are ready and request the service. Originally targeted for October 2001, the FCC granted extensions to most wireless service providers (WSPs) regarding their Phase II capabilities. The date many now reference as the deadline for all WSPs to be Phase II capable is December 31, 2005. To be considered Phase II compliant WSPs, using handsetbased location systems, must be capable of providing a callers location within 50 meters at least 67% of the time. WSPs using networkbased location systems must be capable of providing a callers location within 100 meters at least 67% of the time. These technologies deliver latitude/longitude information, to assist the PSAP call taker in locating a wireless 911 caller when needed. WSPs also typically provide additional uncertainty and confidence data to help call takers judge the reliability of the latitude and longitude coordinates delivered. Although the FCCs Phase II requirement does not mandate a GIS in the PSAP to answer wireless 911 calls, GIS is a good way to make use of the location data being delivered with Phase II calls.

The 911 Office Role in funding GIS

As an incentive for PSAP participation in the Wireless E911 Project, the 911 Office will provide participating PSAPs a onetime allotment for costs associated with implementation of a GIS. Primary PSAPs that agree to answer wireless E911 calls directly, or secondary PSAPs that receive transferred wireless calls through the E911 network, may request GIS funding by following the GIS Reimbursement Claim Process or the GIS Direct Funding Process outlined in the State of California 911 Operations Manual (911 Manual), Chapter III Funding. You may view Chapter III at http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/td/911/Chapter3.pdf on the 911 Office website.

GETTING STARTED AND DEFINING YOUR GIS

To get started, it is important to define what you want in a GIS Project Statement. The following GIS Project Statement template and example can be used as a starting point for PSAPs to consider when defining the GIS Plan in terms of who, what, where, when, how, why, and how much. Some research will be required to fill in the blanks to develop a good summary of what the allotted GIS funds will be used for. Such a project statement might also be used as a guide for final system acceptance. Click on the following link for more information on project planning:

Detailed information on GIS pla"

More information on GIS planning, research, and analysis

Sample format for GIS Project Statement

The (PSAP AGENCY( will be acquiring the (GIS VENDOR & PRODUCT( GIS that shall accommodate the State of California WirelessALI Format (LATEST VERSION( as well as future formats and be integrated by (GIS INTEGRATOR( into (MANUFACTURER( ( Choose CPE or CAD or Standalone( (MODEL(, for (# OF WORKSTATIONS( workstations. The GIS shall use (# OF MAP LAYERS( map layers from (MAP DATA SOURCE(S)( to display the most accurate location of any 911 caller and be fully functional with all service providers (Traditional Wireline, Wireless, VoIP, Telematics, and others) data variations for $(COST( by (DATE(. This installation also includes the upgrades of map display software by (GIS INTEGRATOR)( for for (# YEARS( years at a cost of $(COST( per year, and maintenance of map data sets by (MAP DATA SOURCE(S)( for (# YEARS( years at a cost of $(COST( per year.

Sample GIS Project Statement

The XYZ PD will be acquiring the ORION Mapstar GIS that shall accommodate the State of California ALI Format 04 as well as future formats and be integrated by SBC into Plant CPE VESTA for 4 workstations. The GIS shall use 10 map layers from XYZ County, Thomas Brothers, US Forest Service, and imagery available at CaSIL, to display the most accurate location of any 911 caller and be fully functional with all service providers (Wireless, VoIP, Telematics, and others) data variations for $60,000 by March 1, 2006. This installation also includes the upgrades of map display software by SBC for ORION Mapstar for 4 years at a cost of $7,500 per year, and maintenance of map data sets by XYZ County for 4 years at a cost of $1,000 per year.

Preparing a GIS Spending Plan

The sections pertaining to GIS in the 911 Manual, located at http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/td/911/Chapter3.pdf can be found on pages 1617 and 2324. As noted on page 23, the 911 Office requires PSAPs to submit a GIS spending plan in order to obtain a funding commitment from the 911 Office for GIS. GIS spending plans should detail all GIS expenditures.

To assist PSAPs with their GIS spending plans, this document includes a GIS Spending Plan Checklist and GIS Spending Plan Summary. The checklist highlights the major issues that PSAPs should consider and address before requesting GIS funding. For detail regarding terms and concepts, as well as examples of spending plans, hyperlinks have been provided. The summary provides a sample format for PSAPs to follow in completing their GIS spending plan.

GIS SPENDING PLAN CHECKLIST

In th