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FUN FOR ALL 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
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5th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON VIDEO GAME TRANSLATION AND ACCESSIBILITY
Residència d'Investigadors de Barcelona
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TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................................................................. 2 CONFERENCE ORGANISERS ...................................................................................... 3 FOREWORD .................................................................................................................. 4 CONFERENCE PROGRAMME – Day 1 ......................................................................... 5 CONFERENCE PROGRAMME – Day 2 ......................................................................... 6 VENUES ......................................................................................................................... 8 KEYNOTE SPEAKER – Day 1 ........................................................................................ 9
Jérôme Dupire ........................................................................................................ 9 KEYNOTE SPEAKER – Day 2 ...................................................................................... 10
Miguel Ángel Bernal-Merino ................................................................................. 10 SPEAKERS .................................................................................................................. 11 LIST OF SPEAKERS .................................................................................................... 37
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Sponsors:
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FOREWORD The video game industry has become a worldwide phenomenon, generating millions in revenue every year. Video games are increasingly becoming more elaborate and sophisticated, with advanced graphics and intricate story lines, and developers and publishers need to reach the widest possible audience in order to maximise their return on investment. Translating games into other languages and designing games that can be played for a wide spectrum of players, regardless of their (dis)ability, are two obvious ways to contribute to increasing the audience for the game industry. In addition, games are increasingly being used for “serious” purposes beyond entertainment, such as education, and such games should also be designed inclusively, to facilitate access to them by all types of players. Research on game translation, localization and accessibility has been gaining momentum in recent years. In particular, the number of studies analysing game translation and localisation from different perspectives has increased dramatically, while game accessibility remains a relatively unexplored topic. The Fun for All: 5th International Conference on Game Translation and Accessibility - Current Trends and Future Developments aims to bring together professionals, scholars, practitioners and other interested parties to explore game localisation and accessibility in theory and practice, to discuss the linguistic and cultural dimensions of game localisation, to investigate the relevance and application of translation theory for this very specific and rapidly expanding translational genre, and to analyse the challenges game accessibility poses to the industry and how to overcome them. The successful previous editions of the Fun for All: International Conference on Translation and Accessibility in Video Games, held at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona in 2010, 2012, 2014, and 2016 have become a meeting point for academy and professionals working in the game industry and the game localisation industry, as well as students and translators interested in this field. The fifth edition of the Fun for All Conference aims to continue fostering the interdisciplinary debate in these fields, to consolidate them as academic areas of research and to contribute to the development of best practices.
THE ORGANISING COMMITTEE TransMedia Catalonia Research Group
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona funforall.conference@gmail.com
June, 2018
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CONFERENCE PROGRAMME – Day 1 THURSDAY, 7th JUNE 2018 08:30 - 09:00 Registration
09:00 – 09:15
09:15 – 10:15
KEYNOTE LECTURE Jérôme Dupire, CEDRIC/CNAM: Video game accessibility in 2018: what we did, what we do and what could be done
10:15 – 11:45
PANEL 1: Serious Games and Applications / Chair: Xiaochun Zhang — Minako O'Hagan, University of Auckland: Captions on Holodeck: Exploring the use of
Augmented Reality to project lecture captions to improve learner experience at university
— José Ramón Calvo-Ferrer, José Ramón Belda, Universitat d'Alacant: Assessing language proficiency in translator and interpreter training with video games: An ongoing project
— Rafael Müller Galhardi, Translator: A Translation gaming app
Coffee Break (11:45 - 12:15) 12:15 – 13:45
PANEL 2: Game Accessibility / Chair: José Ramón Calvo — Tomás Costal, Pilar Rodríguez-Arancón, UNED: Panorama of video game dubbing and
accessibility in Spain
— Ivan Borshchevsky, Alexey Kozulyaev, Rufilms LLC: Making Video Games Accessible to the Visually Impaired Users in Russia: Trends and Challenges
Lunch (13:45 - 14:45) 14:45 – 16:30
PANEL 3: Game Accessibility and Game Localisation: Research and terminological issues / Chair: Minako O'Hagan — Tomás Costal, Pilar Rodríguez-Arancón, UNED: From Intractable to Hyperaccessible: The
Current State of Video Game Subtitling
— Laura Mejías, Universitat Jaume I: The Interactive Nature of Video Games: Implications for Research
— Ximo Granell, Universitat Jaume I: Early Research in Video Game Localisation: mapping dissertations at university
— Miguel Ferreiro, Universidad de Salamanca: Game Localisation and Terminology: Brief research about the use of terminology in video games
Coffee Break (16:30 - 17:00) 17:00 – 19:00
PANEL 4: Game Localisation: Localisation of Japanese Games and localisation for Specific Territories / Chair: Carme Mangiron — Tomás Grau de Pablos, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: The Quest for Authenticity:
Determining the Nature of Japaneseness in Formal and Informal Localization
— Dominik Kuda, University of Warsaw: Video Game Localisation in Poland – A Diachronic
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Look
— Luo Dong, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Game Localisation for the Chinese Market
— Phatchawalan Na-Nakhon, Mahidol University, Thailand: “Class Zero, Commencing Maneuvers”: Localization of Final Fantasy Type-0 HD from English into Thai
Conference social dinner (Thursday, 7th June 2018 – 8:00 pm) MAMA CAFÉ RESTAURANT Carrer Doctor Dou, 10 http://www.mamacaferestaurant.com/ Nearest underground stations: L3 Catalunya / L3 Liceu (Green Line) L1 Catalunya / L1 Universitat (Red Line) CONFERENCE PROGRAMME – Day 2 FRIDAY, 8th JUNE 2018 09:00 – 10:00
KEYNOTE LECTURE Miguel Ángel Bernal-Merino, University of Roehampton: Playability and multimodality in game localisation
10:00 – 11:30
PANEL 1: Game localisation: Industry Perspectives and Models / Chair: Tomás Grau — Leticia Sáenz, Manuela Ceccoli, Keywords Studios: How to Level Up your Loc
— Felipe Mercader, Freelance Game Translator: Economics and Investment in Game Localization: Impact of Localization on Sales, Mutation of EFIGS due to New-Emerging Markets, and the Spanish Situation
— Francesca Pezzoli, Ricardo Lausdei, Università degli Studi di Bologna: An Innovative Game Localization Model: Multileveled Virtual Teams
Coffee break (11:30 - 12:00) 12:00 – 13:30
PANEL 2: Game localisation: Processes, Technology and Risk Management / Chair: Pablo Muñoz — Marcus Toftedahl, University of Skövde: Localization in Indie Game Production
— Jordi Arnal, Kaneda Games: The Localization Technology behind Kaneda Games
— Xiaochun Zhang, University of Bristol: Risk Management in Game Localisation
Lunch (13:30 - 14:30)
14:30 – 16:30
PANEL 3: Game localisation: Case Studies / Chair: Miquel Pujol — Natalia Jaén, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: The Importance of Terms of
Address and Gender Language in Character Development in JRPG
— Francisco González, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Creative language and its impacts on video game localisation: a case study on Pokémon Sun and Moon
— Miquel Pujol-Tubau, Universitat de Vic: Third languages (L3) in transmedia video games and their translation. A case study of "The Witcher 3"
— Silvia Pettini, Università degli Studi Roma Tre: Translating the “Virtual Self” in Game Localization: The case of The Sims 4
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PANEL 4: Fan Translation / Chair: Miquel Pujol — Xiaoxiao Qu, Communication University of China: It Takes a Community: A Case
Study of Darkest Dungeon the Indie Game’s Localization in Mainland China
— Selahattin Karagöz, Ege Üniversitesi: Fan Localisation Practices in Turkey: A Comparative Case Study
— Omid Saheb Vossoughi, Project Manager International Translation Company: The Elder Scrolls Online – How fan translation can become a model of localization for videogame companies by using the crowdsourcing method
18:30 Closing remarks
VENUES Residència d'Investigadors de Barcelona C/ Hospital, 64 08001 Barcelona Telephone: 0034 93 443 86 10 Fax: 0034 93 442 82 02 https://www.google.com/maps?q=+C/Hospital,+64+-+08001+-+Barcelona MAMA CAFÉ RESTAURANT Carrer Doctor Dou, 10 http://www.mamacaferestaurant.com/
Nearest underground stations: § L3 Catalunya / L3 Liceu (Green Line) § L1 Catalunya / L1 Universitat (Red
Line)
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CEDRIC/CNAM
Video game accessibility in 2018: what we did, what we do and what could be done Video game accessibility is not a new field. For years now, people have worked on it and designed solutions. Unfortunately, the industry did not adopt as fast as they could these propositions. These last years came with a new legal context, motivating the industry to be aware of and to begin to implement accessibility solutions. Things are now moving in the right direction and we even have the opportunity to build new perspectives to make the video games accessible from a huge variety of ways. Jerome Dupire is an assistant professor at the Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers (CNAM) since 2010. He holds a Masters degree in Computer Science (CNAM, Paris), a Masters degree in Biomechanics and Physiology (Pierre et Marie Curie University, Paris), and a Ph.D in Computer Sciences (CNAM, Paris). His teaching activity at the Ecole Nationale des Jeux et Media Interactifs Numériques (ENJMIN) covers topics such as physical computing, prototyping, interaction design and accessibility for disabled gamers. He also initiated and leads an annual workshop called Inclus et Connectés: for one week, this workshop brings together students from different fields, such as computer engineers, game/sound/graphic/UX designers and programmers and makes them work on the topic of alternative interactions and the inclusion of disabled users. His research activity takes place at the Centre dEtude et De Recherche en Informatique et Communications (CEDRIC) lab, within the Human-Computer Interaction team. One of his main fields of research is digital accessibility for disabled people and especially accessibility applied to video games. He is the co-founder and chairman of the working group TC14.9 on Game Accessibility at the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) whose aim is to promote academic and industrial research on game accessibility for disabled gamers. Jerome is also the president of Capgame, a non-profit association he co-founded in 2013, which is promoting game accessibility for disabled gamers. Capgame is leading different actions, from communication towards the general public and broadcasting available technical solutions (hardware and software) for disabled gamers, to consulting for game studios and training for professionals.
Time slot: Thursday 09:15 - 10:15
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KEYNOTE SPEAKER – Day 2 Miguel Ángel Bernal-Merino University of Roehampton
Playability and multimodality in game localisation Creativity is one of the most debated topics in translation not only because of how it relates to authorship but also because of the unavoidable cultural ramifications and the business implications for all the parties involved. Identifying the parameters within which creative translation operates in rich media products is a complex process that comprises many variables beyond the linguistic ones, and even more so when dealing with multimedia interactive entertainment software (MIES). This seminar put forward new findings explaining the creativity in various entertainment products. The notion of neural networks is proposed as a way of explaining highly artistic translation within the constraints of each product type. We will explore many examples in order to isolate 'playability', the unique feature of creative game localisation. A creative thinker, Miguel Á. Bernal-Merino, PhD in the localisation of multimedia interactive entertainment software at Imperial College London, is the main international researcher in video game localisation. He is the author of the acclaimed monograph Translation and Localisation in Video Games: Making Entertainment Software Global (2015), and has published the leading articles on the subject in both professional and scholarly journals. He co-leads the AHRC-funded Media Across Borders Network and is a co-editor of Media Across Borders: The Localisation of Audiovisual Content (2016) for the reputable Routledge series lead by D. Thussu. He collaborates with universities and companies across Europe on projects related to media translation and video game localisation. He is the co-founder and elected chair of the ‘IGDA Localization SIG’. Dr. Bernal-Merino created the main international events in this field, the ‘Game Localization Round Table’ (at the heart of the language services industry), and the ‘Localization Summit’ (the main developers conference for the game industry), and has coordinated them from their conception.
Time slot: Friday 09:00 - 10:00
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SPEAKERS Jordi Arnal jordi.arnal@kaneda-games.com Kaneda Games
The localization technology behind Kaneda Games Kaneda Games started as indie game developer at 2012 and we were very concerned about the localization of our games. Since the beginning we had a close collaboration with translators because of our link to the University. In that presentation we want to show how we used our early localization technology based on xml files where translator didn't feel very comfortable with them, our improvements with xls files and moving to the cloud with google spreadsheet where different translators can work on the localization of the game at the same time. We will show our first game dubbed in more than 10 languages ‘Prolog’ and we will talk about some concerns about dubbing a game. Finally we will show how our technology works on production pipeline where we can test in real time changes on localization and will talk about grammar rules which improve the quality of the localization. Jordi Arnal is a computer engineer at UPC (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) and has a Master degree at videogames at UPF (Universitat Pompeu Fabra). He has worked as videogame developer for more than 10 years in different videogames companies in Barcelona and is the CEO of Kaneda Games, a Barcelona-based indie videogame company, specializing in Serious Games and Videogames for PC and consoles. He works also as teacher at different universities in Spain, such as UOC, UPF and UB, teaching how to create videogames and videogame programming. As a game developer he has attended different events, such as GDC, E3, Gamescom, Game Connection, etc.
Time slot: Friday 12:00 - 13:30 Ivan Borshchevsky & Alexey Kozulyaev ivan.borsh@gmail.com, avkozulyaev@rusubtitles.com RuFilms, LLC
Making Video Games Accessible to the Visually Impaired Users in Russia: Trends and Challenges Video games have become a very popular way to spend free time since 1950s when the first, very primitive games were invented by several scientists. Since then, an increasing number of people with special needs has been interested in playing video games. However, there are certain obstacles in making games accessible to this category of players. In Russia, the first challenge of making the games accessible to the visually impaired users is the lack of skilled audio describers. The fact is that the AD in Russia is called "typhlocomenting". This term was introduced for the first time in early 2000s. The procedure of "typhlocommenting" has been patented and, therefore, the legislation forbids any deviation from the "canonical methodology" which does not provide for the description of video games. At the same time, efforts were made to avoid mentioning of the term "audio description" in public and replace
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it with a newly invented one. This terminological "Iron Curtain" has cut off Russian describers and AD consumers from the international experience. At the same time, there is a great need of description of the video games. There is a number of web- sites created by enthusiasts where accessible games are collected (mostof all, so- called "text games"). This review will present ways of meeting the challenges in making the video games accessible to this audience. Ivan Borshchevsky, a linguist, clinical psychologist, Russian Sign Language interpreter, audiovisual translator and audio describer; a member of the Audio Description Association (UK) and the International Medical Interpreters' Association. Alexey Kozulyaev, Ph.D. is a member of the board of directors of RuFilms Group and Director of RuFilms School of Audiovisual Translation. He has been a prominent Russian AV translator since 1993 and is the author of the internationally renowned didactic system of training of AV translators. The course is taught in 11 domestic and 2 foreign universities. Alexey is also very active in providing corporate training and translator coaching for major gaming and SVoD companies. He's a graduate of the Moscow State Linguistic University and New York Film Academy. In 1992-1994 Alexey hosted Face Russia live show on Channel 2 and for 6 years worked for several American TV channels.
Time slot: Thursday 12:15 - 13:45 José Ramón Calvo-Ferrer, José Ramón Belda & Miguel Tolosa jr.calvo@ua.es, jr.belda@ua.es, miguel.tolosa@ua.es University of Alicante
Assessing language proficiency in translator and interpreter training with video games: An ongoing project One of the salient problems in translator and interpreter training is the heterogeneous proficiency levels in the second language classroom. Complaints about lack of linguistic skills at early stages are common amongst teachers at tertiary levels. Whatever the case, there is an evident ambiguity in determining the students' proficiency level as a result of such heterogeneity. This inevitably brings about difficulties in the adoption of necessary training actions, which in many cases consist of general measures, a sort of passe-partout merely tackling linguistic issues in a superficial manner. However, it is possible to diagnose the problem in a more accurate manner, as well as to identify the causes underlying the deficiencies that lead to foreign languages skills undermining translator and interpreter training. The development of technologies designed to assess language proficiency may provide instructors with tools to overcome such issues in translator and interpreting training. Video games, for example, have been successfully used as data mining tools to identify patterns and predict outcomes in education (Illanas Vila, Calvo-Ferrer, Gallego Durán, & Llorens Largo, 2013). In line with this, we wish to introduce an ongoing project on the development of a video game designed to predict both translation and linguistic skills of students of the degree in Translation and Interpreting, aimed at identifying student needs in second language training, so as to make language training for translators and interpreters specific, adaptative and purposeful. José Ramón Calvo-Ferrer holds a PhD in Translation and Interpreting from the Universidad de Alicante, where he teaches different modules on English and teacher
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training since 2008. His research interests lie in ICT in general and video games in particular for second language learning and training. He has published various papers on video games, multimodality and second language learning in specialised journals (British Journal of Educational Technology, ReCALL, etc.) and he also visits regularly the universities of Essex and Kent, where he delivers talks and leads workshops on video games and translation. Dr José Ramón Belda Medina is a Senior Lecturer or Associate Professor (Profesor Titular), Department of English Studies, at the University of Alicante (Spain). He completed his studies in Germany, the UK and the USA. He has been teaching English as a Second Language (ESL), Español como Lengua Extranjera (ELE) and Historical and Applied Linguistics for 18 years in Spain (Alicante, Valencia, Barcelona) and in other countries (Germany, UK, Ireland, USA). He participated in the implementation of different English and Spanish language teaching programmes at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He was the Resident Director of a Master Program in Spanish co-organised with Central Michigan University (USA) and Spanish Academic Coordinator for several American colleges at the Universidad de Alicante. His research interests are Second Language Acquisition, Applied Linguistics, Terminology, ICTs and internationalization. He has participated in different international conferences (BAAL, TESOL, AEDEAN, AESLA, etc.) and research projects and published several articles in scientific journals (Target, Meta, Translation and Terminology, Babel, etc.). He was the Academic Director of the Rafael Altamira Summer Program at the UA for six years (2006-2012), coordinating 30 Summer courses and approx. 2,000 students per year and he designed and coordinated the International Summer Program (www.isp.ua.es), co-organised with several American universities (University of Missouri, Central Michigan University, Rutgers University, Western Illinois University, University of Memphis, Instituto Tecnológico de Monterrey, etc.) at the University of Alicante. He was the Director of International Mobility (Office of International Relations) for 4 years (2012-2016). He was in charge of all exchange programmes and international partnerships with the University of Alicante (30,000 students). He prepared and coordinated the new Erasmus+ program (2014-2016) at the UA and participated in several global education conferences every year (EAIE, NAFSA, QS-APPLE) where he negotiated new international agreements with several universities from different countries (UK, USA, Canada, France, Germany, South Korea,…