FUL L SCREEN CULTURE HOT TAKESCULTURE HOT TAKES · PDF file “diversity,” and the...

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Transcript of FUL L SCREEN CULTURE HOT TAKESCULTURE HOT TAKES · PDF file “diversity,” and the...

  • GENERATIONS

    CULTURE HOT TAKESCULTURE HOT TAKES F U L L S C R E E N

    Monday morning kicks off the workweek for most folks. But at 8:30am on Monday, August 17, 1969, on a 600-acre dairy farm in upstate New York, Jimi Hendrix was just taking the stage to close out a three-day, first-of-its-kind music festival. It’s been 50 years since Woodstock, and although a lot has changed, people today are just as entranced by Woodstock’s concepts of peace, love and music, just spinning them in their own way—these days it’s not just about world peace but inner peace, not only about free love but self-love, and not just about a single musical genre but about blending genres to innovate a new one.

    In the age of the digital and social revolution, young Boomers then and Millennials now may seem like different species, but with a closer look, the similarities between the generations reveal themselves. It’s no coincidence that Woodstock organizers attempted to pull off a 50th anniversary show this month. As in 1969, people in 2019 are clamoring for connection, activism, and immersive entertainment—and even though Woodstock 50 wasn’t able to happen, brands can cater to these desires to engage consumers today.

    TALKIN’ ‘BOUT THE GENERATIONS…

    Boomers “Me Generation” Millennials “Me, Me, Me Generation”

    Born 1946-1964, currently 55-73 years old

    Born 1981-1996, currently 23-38 years old

    Defined As: hardworking realists

    Big Moments: Vietnam War, the Great Inflation, moon landing, civil rights movement

    Life Path: adolescence into 9 to 5 job, married at 22 and having kids right 
 away, ownership economy

    Defined As: optimistic dreamers

    Big Moments: 9/11, the Great Recession, the Internet,

    #blacklivesmatter

    Life Path: extended adolescence, gig employment, married at 29 and having


    kids later if ever, sharing economy

    TOP THREE TRAITS MILLENNIALS SELECTED TO DEFINE THEIR GENERATION*

    Young Boomers participated in the civil rights movement in the ‘60s to push for equality, and Millennials continue to further this agenda today. Millennials believe their generation is defined by “diversity,” and the acceptance of diversity goes far beyond race to include gender, religion, physical abilities, and more.

    Although there isn’t a literal war splitting Millennials into pro- and anti- factions like
 the Vietnam War when Boomers were adolescents, Millennials also define their generation as “divided.” This divide can be seen on social media, as platforms that were intended to connect users caused them in some instances to choose sides around divisive political and social issues.

    Despite the stereotype of Millennial entitlement, they believe “independence” defines their generation. Many Millennials split from the previously dictated life path of 9 to 5 jobs, marriage and children, and homeownership that were aspirations of Boomers. Instead, they’re not only disrupting systems and industries but also disrupting preconceived societal expectations.

    FESTIVAL-GOERS 50 YEARS AGO (THE HIPPIES) FESTIVAL-GOERS TODAY (THE DISRUPTORS)

    YOUNG GENERATIONS THEN & NOW | FROM POLAROIDS TO MEMES

    DIVERSITY (33%) DIVIDED (28%) INDEPENDENCE (27%)

    1 © 2019 FULLSCREEN, INC., ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION INTENDED ONLY FOR USE BY AUTHORIZED INDIVIDUALS WITHIN FULLSCREEN, INC., AND OTTER MEDIA AND NOT FOR GENERAL DISTRIBUTION. PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL.* Fullscreen Generational Report, 13-38-year-olds, N=1,500 | ** Fullscreen Culture Report: The Social Media Hangover, 18-34-year-olds, N=500 | *** Fullscreen TBH, 18-34-year-olds, N=320

    THREE TRAITS

  • NOWTHEN

    18-34-year-olds agree

    that entertainment can

    bring people together**

    61%

    WATCHINGStar Trek on cable television Stranger Things on Netflix

    LISTENINGThe Abbey Road album on a record player This American Life podcast on an iPhone

    WEARINGMary Jane shoes, Tie-dye Chunky dad sneaks, Tie-dye

    BUYINGCrystals to connect with the mystical, records, Polaroid cameras Crystals to practice self-care, AirPods, CBD

    KEEPING UP WITH POP CULTUREReading Rolling Stone magazine Scrolling through stories on Instagram

    ACTIVISMAttending anti-war rallies Joining a social media campaign

    CELEBRITY FIGURESHollywood actors, Rock ‘n’ roll stars, Professional athletes Digital creators, Politicians, Entrepreneurs

    BODY IMAGETwiggy, Magazine models Ashley Graham, Instagram models

    Many things have changed since 1969, but many haven’t. The social cred a young Boomer earned by attending a rock ‘n’ roll concert is reflected in the “likes” a young Millennial receives on an Instagram post. Crystals that were once used as part of the hippie movement now fuel the modern focus on self- care. Social activism hashtags are today’s protest signs. Methods have morphed, but the desire for betterment—both of one’s self and the world—is still a key characteristic of young generations.

    Despite the cancelation of Woodstock 50, the desire for such an event is felt by generations young and old. In the country’s divisive political climate, a festival promoting peace & music is just the kind of IRL connection people are looking for—not just for entertainment, but as a way to promote inclusivity and unity. And it’s not just politics that young people are seeking respite from. Overindulging on social media has gotten them down—53% think being constantly connected to their devices worsens their wellbeing**—and they’re craving a reason to look up and away from their screens, a premise Woodstock 50 offered.

    BE A POSITIVE FORCE: Just as too much loud music can leave one’s ears ringing, digital noise can have an unpleasant after-effect. When your brand posts on social media, provide an antidote to the digital overload by focusing on the same pinnacles consumers are seeking from a Woodstock-esque event, including mindfulness, community, and entertainment. 

    EMBRACE YOUR BRAND LEGACY: If your brand has been around since Boomers’ early days, recognize your roots and theirs by focusing on how your brand has stayed true in its mission to consumers over the past 50+ years. If your brand is on the newer side, consider the legacy you are creating now. 

    HELP THEM DISCONNECT TO RECONNECT: Although Millennials use social media to connect, they also want a reason to look up from their screens and engage IRL. Host activations that help them disconnect and focus on the people and environment around them by uniting them around a common passion like music or shared values such as peace and progress, like the original Woodstock did.

    of 13-38-year-olds think 
 that things in this country 
 are headed in the

    wrong direction*

    63% of 18-34-year-olds have
 attended or are interested in

    attending a music festival 
 (e.g. Governors Ball, Coachella, Bonnaroo)***

    85%

    1

    2

    3

    BOOMERS | RADICAL FREE LOVE

    v MILLENNIALS | RADICAL SELF LOVE

    WILDIN THE WILD

    THEN AND NOW

    BRANDBRAND IMPLICATIONS

    2 © 2019 FULLSCREEN, INC., ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS CONFIDENTIAL AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION INTENDED ONLY FOR USE BY AUTHORIZED INDIVIDUALS WITHIN FULLSCREEN, INC., AND OTTER MEDIA AND NOT FOR GENERAL DISTRIBUTION. PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL.* Fullscreen Generational Report, 13-38-year-olds, N=1,500 | ** Fullscreen Culture Report: The Social Media Hangover, 18-34-year-olds, N=500 | *** Fullscreen TBH, 18-34-year-olds, N=320