Fuel Cell Technology · PDF file • Polymer exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) DOE...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    24-Oct-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    0
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Fuel Cell Technology · PDF file • Polymer exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) DOE...

  • John Jechura – jjechura@mines.edu Updated: January 4, 2015

    Fuel Cell Technology

  • Energy Markets Are Interconnected

    2

    https://publicaffairs.llnl.gov/news/energy/energy.html

  • Topics

    • Basics & types of fuel cells

    • Fuel cells for transportation

    • Hydrogen for the fuel cells

    • Efficiencies

    3

  • Fuel Cell Principals

    Chemistry of Fuel Cell  (with H+ transfer)

    • Anode side:

     2H2  4 H+ 2 e‐

    • Cathode side:

     O2 + 4 H+ 2 e‐ 2 H2O

    • Overall:

     2H2 + O2  2 H2O

    Fuel cell provides a direct current flow of electrons

    5

  • Types of Fuel Cells

    • Alkaline fuel cell (AFC)

     One of the oldest designs 

    • U.S. space program used them since  the 1960s to make power & drinking  water

     Very susceptible to contamination,  requires pure hydrogen & oxygen

     Very expensive, unlikely to be  commercialized

    6

    http://americanhistory.si.edu/fuelcells/basics.htm

  • Types of Fuel Cells

    • Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)

     Operates at very high temperatures – 700 to  1,000C

    • High temperature makes reliability a  problem when cycling on and off  repeatedly

    • Very stable when in continuous use

     High temperature can produce steam to  generate more electricity – improves overall  efficiency of the system 

     Best suited for large‐scale stationary power  generators

    7

    http://americanhistory.si.edu/fuelcells/basics.htm

  • Types of Fuel Cells

    • Molten‐carbonate fuel cell (MCFC)

     Also best suited for large stationary  power generators

    • Operate at 600C & can generate  steam 

     Lower operating temperature means  they don't need such exotic materials

    • Design little less expensive

    8

    http://americanhistory.si.edu/fuelcells/basics.htm

  • Types of Fuel Cells

    • Polymer exchange membrane fuel cell  (PEMFC)

     DOE  focusing on PEMFC as most likely  candidate for transportation 

     High power density & relatively low  operating temperature (60 to 80C)

    • Doesn't take long for the fuel cell to  warm up & begin generating  electricity 

    9

    http://americanhistory.si.edu/fuelcells/basics.htm

  • Types of Fuel Cells

    • Phosphoric‐acid fuel cell (PAFC)  Operates at higher temperature than PEMFCs, longer warm‐up time

     Potential for use in small stationary power‐generation systems but unsuitable for use in  cars

    • Direct‐methanol fuel cell (DMFC)  Comparable to PEMFC (operating temperature) but not as efficient

     Requires relatively large amount of platinum to act as a catalyst – makes these fuel cells  expensive 

    10

  • PEMFC: Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    • Anode  Conducts the electrons that are freed from the hydrogen molecules  Has channels etched into it that disperse the hydrogen gas equally over the surface of the catalyst

    • Cathode  Has channels etched into it that distribute the oxygen to the surface of the catalyst  Conducts the electrons back from the external circuit to the catalyst – recombine with the hydrogen  ions & oxygen to form water

    • Electrolyte is proton exchange membrane  Only conducts positively charged ions & blocks electrons  Membrane must be hydrated in order to function & remain stable

    • Limits how low a temperature the fuel cell can operate • Catalyst facilitates reaction of oxygen & hydrogen  Usually made of platinum nanoparticles very thinly coated onto carbon paper or cloth

    http://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel‐efficiency/alternative‐fuels/fuel‐cell2.htm

    12

  • Possible Fuel Cell Vehicle

    13

    http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/fuelcell.shtml

  • Large Scale Hydrogen Production

    • Steam Reforming

     CH4 + H2O  CO + 3∙H2  Highly endothermic

    • Partial Oxidation

     2 CH4 + O2  2 CO + 4 H2  Highly exothermic

     If solid feedstock, one possible gasification reaction

    • Autothermal Reforming  Combines both steam reforming and partial oxidation to achieve an energy‐neutral  process

     Often uses oxygen rather than air

    15

  • Real Process – Steam Methane Reforming & Water Shift

    Steam

    Natural Gas

    Reforming Reactor

    High Temperature Shift Reactor

    Low Temperature Shift Reactor

    Hydrogen Purification

    Fuel Gas

    Flue Gas

    Hydrogen

    Methanation Reactor

    CO2

    • Reforming.  Endothermic catalytic reaction,  typically 20‐30 atm & 800‐880°C (1470‐ 1615°F) outlet.

    CH4 + H2O  CO + 3 H2 • Shift conversion.  Exothermic fixed‐bed catalytic 

    reaction, possibly in two steps. 

    CO + H2O  CO2 + H2 HTS: 345‐370°C (650 – 700F) LTS: 230°C (450F)

    16

    • Gas Purification.  Absorb CO2 (amine) or separate  into pure H2 stream (PSA or membrane).

    • Methanation.  Convert residual CO & CO2 back  to methane. Exothermic fixed‐bed catalytic  reactions at 370‐425°C (700 – 800F).

    CO + 3 H2  CH4 + H2O

    CO2 + 4 H2  CH4 + 2 H2O

  • On‐Board Fuel Reforming

    • Liquid fuel would avoid having heavy high‐pressure gas containers  Gasoline, alcohols (methanol, ethanol, …)

    • Reforming of fuel produces CO2 emissions  Will not qualify as zero emissions vehicles (ZEVs) under California's emissions laws

    17

  • Current Problems with Reformers Supplying Fuel Cells

    • Reforming reaction takes place at high temperatures – slow to start up & requires costly  high temperature materials

    • Sulfur compounds in the fuel poison certain catalysts

     Research into sulfur‐tolerant catalysts

    • Low temperature polymer fuel cell membranes can be poisoned by CO produced by the  reactor

     PEMFC need complex CO‐removal systems

     SOFC & MCFC operate at higher temperatures & do not have this problem

    • Efficiency of process 70% ‐ 85% (LHV basis)

    • Catalyst in low temperature fuel cells is based on platinum & is very expensive

     Typical automotive fuel cell stack (100kW) contains 20‐30 g of platinum metal – currently ~$1700 per troy oz ($60 per g)

    18

  • Overall Efficiencies

    • Gasoline internal combustion – 20 – 25%

    • Battery powered vehicle

     65% of electricity in

    • Batter efficiency – 90% 

    • Charging efficiency – 90% 

    • Motor/inverter – 80%

     Efficiency of power generation?

    • Combustion based 40% – 26% overall

    • Hydro electric based – “free” electricity?  

    • Fuel cells with pure hydrogen

     Potentially 80% efficient

     Overall efficiency with 80% efficient motor/inverter – 64%

    • Fuel cells with reformed fuel

     Including reformer efficiency – 45 to 51%

    20