Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Gastric Glomus fine-needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNAC) ... and...

Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Gastric Glomus fine-needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNAC) ... and epithelioid GIST.3,4 The cells of carcinoid tumors are in gland-like or rosette-like
Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Gastric Glomus fine-needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNAC) ... and epithelioid GIST.3,4 The cells of carcinoid tumors are in gland-like or rosette-like
Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Gastric Glomus fine-needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNAC) ... and epithelioid GIST.3,4 The cells of carcinoid tumors are in gland-like or rosette-like
Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Gastric Glomus fine-needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNAC) ... and epithelioid GIST.3,4 The cells of carcinoid tumors are in gland-like or rosette-like
Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Gastric Glomus fine-needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNAC) ... and epithelioid GIST.3,4 The cells of carcinoid tumors are in gland-like or rosette-like
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Transcript of Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Gastric Glomus fine-needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNAC) ... and...

  • 448

    The Korean Journal of Pathology 2010; 44: 448-52DOI: 10.4132/KoreanJPathol.2010.44.4.448

    Glomus tumors of the stomach are rare and are usually found as a solitary, intramural lesion.Here, we report a case of a gastric glomus tumor in a 60-year-old woman diagnosed by endo-scopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology. Endoscopic ultrasound revealed a4 3 cm-sized, round, isoechoic mass at the fourth layer of the gastric wall. Smears revealedcohesive clusters of small, uniform, round to polygonal cells with scant cytoplasm and round,hyperchromatic nuclei with homogeneous chromatin. Immunocytochemistry by liquid-basedcytology was positive for smooth muscle actin. The cytologic diagnosis of a glomus tumor wasconfirmed by a specimen from the laparoscopic resection. Although the cytologic features ofglomus tumors are quite distinctive, an immunocytochemical stain from a liquid-based cytolo-gy preparation can further help to ascertain the diagnosis.

    Key Words : Stomach neoplasms; Glomus tumor; Endosonography; Biopsy, fine-needle;Cytology

    Dong Geun LeeKyu Yun JangMyoung Ja ChungWoo Sung MoonMyoung Jae KangHo Sung Park

    448

    Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Gastric Glomus Tumor

    - A Case Report -

    448 448

    Corresponding AuthorHo Sung Park, M.D.Department of Pathology, Chonbuk National UniversityMedical School, San 2-20 Geumam-dong, Deokjin-gu,Jeonju 561-180, KoreaTel: 82-63-270-3073Fax: 82-63-270-3135E-mail: hspark@chonbuk.ac.kr

    *This paper was supported by research funds ofChonbuk National University in 2009.

    Department of Pathology, Institute forMedical Science, Research Institute ofClinical Medicine, Chonbuk NationalUniversity Medical School, Jeonju,Korea

    Received : November 3, 2009Accepted : May 12, 2010

    Glomus tumors are mesenchymal neoplasms composed ofcells that closely resemble the modified smooth muscle cells ofthe normal glomus body.1 The vast majority of glomus tumorsoccur in the distal fingers and toes, particularly the subungualregion.1 Glomus tumors of the stomach are rare and endoscopicultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNAC)is highly accurate and remarkably helpful in the preoperativeevaluation of patients with intramural lesions of the gastroin-testinal tract.2 Moreover, immunocytochemical studies havebeen helpful in the differential diagnosis of gastric submucosaltumors, including gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), car-cinoid tumors, and glomus tumors. Only three reports havepreviously described the cytologic features of gastric glomustumors in the English literature.3-5 This report presents an addi-tional case of a gastric glomus tumor diagnosed by EUS-FNACwith the aid of immunocytochemistry.

    CASE REPORT

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted to evaluate an asympto-matic gastric lesion that had been detected incidentally 1 monthearlier. A physical examination of the abdomen was unremark-able, and laboratory findings including complete blood count,blood chemical analysis, and urinalysis were within normal ran-ges. EUS demonstrated a 4 3 cm-sized, round, isoechoic masson the greater curvature side of the gastric antrum. The masswas located at the fourth sonographic layer of the gastric walland was surrounded by a hypoechoic rim (Fig. 1A). EUS-FNACwas performed with a clinical diagnosis of GIST. One half ofthe aspirates were smeared on slides and the other half were pre-pared for liquid-based cytology (E-Prep, Choongwae, Seoul,Korea). The slides were stained with hematoxylin and eosin orPapanicolaou stain. Conventional smears were moderately cel-

  • FNAC of Gastric Glomus Tumor 449

    Fig. 1. (A) Endoscopic ultrasound findings. A 4 3 cm-sized, round, isoechoic mass is located at the fourth layer of the gastric wall andsurrounded by a hypoechoic rim. (B-F) Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the gastric glomus tumor. (B) Low power view of conventionalsmears shows moderate cellularity with a few cohesive clusters of tumor cells, singly scattered cells, and smooth muscle bundles. (C)The tightly cohesive clusters contain tumor cells, red blood cells, and vascular endothelial cells (arrows). The tumor cells show small,uniform, round cells with a small amount of cytoplasm and relatively round nuclei (Papanicolau). (D) Some tumor cells exhibit a relativelyclear cytoplasm with distinct cell borders, mimicking a honeycomb pattern. (E) Intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions are very occasionallynoted (arrow, Papanicolau). (F) Immunocytochemistry for smooth muscle actin reveals strong reactivity for tumor cells provided by a liq-uid-based cytology preparation.

    C

    E

    D

    F

    A B

  • 450 Dong Geun LeeKyu Yun JangMyoung Ja Chung, et al.

    lular with a few tightly cohesive clusters of tumor cells, singlyscattered cells, hyalinized stroma, and smooth muscle bundles(Fig. 1B). Liquid-based cytology revealed more small-sized andloosely arranged tumor cell clusters than those of conventionalsmears and an increased number of singly scattered tumor cells.Tumor cell clusters contained endothelial cells. In conventionalsmears and liquid-based cytology, the tumor cells were small,round to polygonal and had small amounts of faintly eosino-philic cytoplasm and ill-defined cell borders. The nuclei wereuniform and round to oval in size and shape, and contained ho-mogeneous granular chromatin and indistinct nucleoli (Fig. 1C).However, some tumor cells exhibited relatively clear cytoplasmwith distinct cell borders, mimicking a honeycomb pattern (Fig.1D). Very occasional intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions werenoted (Fig. 1E). No cytologic atypia or mitosis were observed.

    Furthermore, immunocytochemistry was performed using theliquid-based cytology samples and was strongly positive forsmooth muscle actin (SMA) (Fig. 1F). Immunocytochemistryfor chromogranin, CD34 and CD117 (c-Kit) was negative. Alaparoscopic wedge resection of the stomach was performed sub-sequent to a cytologic diagnosis of benign perivascular tumor.Macroscopically, the tumor was a relatively well-circumscribedmass, measuring 3.3 2.2 cm and was located in the muscu-laris propria (Fig. 2A). Microscopically, the tumor was composedof solid sheets of glomus cells interrupted by irregular, thin-walled vessels of varying sizes. The tumor cells were small, uni-form, rounded, and contained centrally-located round nucleiand a lightly eosinophilic cytoplasm (Fig. 2B). Some tumor cellshad a distinct cell border and a clear cytoplasm with a hyalin-ized intervening stroma (Fig. 2C). No necrosis or mitotic fig-

    Fig. 2. Macroscopic and microscopic findings of gastric glomus tumor. (A) The cut surface reveals a relatively well-circumscribed, 3.3 2.2 cm-sized mass in the muscularis propria. (B) The tumor is composed of irregular, thin-walled vessels and solid sheets of tumor cellsthat are small, uniform, round cells with a centrally located, round nucleus and lightly eosinophilic cytoplasm. (C) Some tumor cells revealdistinct cell borders and a clear cytoplasm with a hyalinized intervening stroma. (D) Tumor cells show diffuse cytoplasmic immunoreac-tivity to smooth muscle actin.

    C D

    A B

  • FNAC of Gastric Glomus Tumor 451

    ures were identified. Tumor cells presented diffuse cytoplasmicimmunoreactivity for SMA (Fig. 2D) but were not immunore-active for c-Kit, CD34, S100 protein, desmin, CD56, or chro-mogranin. Three months after the operation, the patient remain-ed in good condition with no signs or symptoms of tumor recur-rence.

    DISCUSSION

    Glomus tumors of the stomach are rare benign lesions oftenfound as a submucosal or intramuscular mass.6 They are mostfrequently present in the prepyloric or antral areas, arise in anyage group, have no predilection for gender, and measure an aver-age of 2-2.5 cm in size.6 Although most of these tumors are be-nign lesions, cases of atypical or malignant variants have beenreported.7 The World Health Organization classification1 ofmalignant glomus tumors is: 1) size > 2 cm with a subfascialor visceral location; 2) atypical mitotic figures; or 3) markednuclear atypia and any level of mitotic activity. Glomus tumorsnot fulfilling the malignancy criteria but with at least one atypi-cal feature other than nuclear pleomorphism are diagnosed asglomus tumors of uncertain malignant potential.1 Because thiscase was not compatible with the diagnostic criteria of malig-nant glomus tumor or glomus tumor of uncertain malignantpotential, a diagnosis of benign glomus tumor was made.

    The preoperative diagnosis of gastric glomus tumors is veryimportant, because the majority of them behave in a benignfashion. However, their deep location may prevent acquiringtissue for diagnosis from an endoscopic biopsy, and their lack ofspecific clinical or radiological features to distinguish them fromother intramural gastric masses may cause difficulty in the diag-nosis. In this instance, EUS-FNAC offers a rapid, cost-effective,diagnostic method for identifying gastric glomus tumors.

    To date, only three cases of FNAC used for the identificationof gastric glomus tumors have been reported.3-5 Among them,two cases were misdiagnosed as carcinoid tumors by cytologyand only one case was diagnosed as a glomus tumor. No immu-nocytochemistry or immunohistochemistry was performed onthe former two cases, but the latter case was diagnosed after per-forming cell block immunohistochemisty. As shown in the re-ported cases, the differential diagnosis of glomus tumor fromother submucosal lesions is not easy with cytologic features alone.In such circumstances, immunocytochemistry from cytologicspecimens or immunohistochemistry from cell blocks ensuresan accurate diagnosis. Unfortunately, a cell block was not pre-

    pared in this case because the cellularity was too low in the aspi-rates to make a cell block. Though a cell block may be a