Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of squamous lesions ... Fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology

Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of squamous lesions ... Fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology
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Transcript of Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of squamous lesions ... Fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology

  • • 493 cases had a histological diagnosis of SCC within 12 months of an FNA. Cytology reports were:

    17 (3.4%) non-diagnostic; 12 (2.4%) Negative; 65 (13.2%) Indeterminate; 399 (80.9%) suspicious

    for/consistent with SCC

    • Risk of malignancy for the reporting categories are summarised in Figure 3. A high proportion of

    cases reported as ‘atypical or indeterminate’ were found to be SCC on histology (71.9%)

    • Cysts containing only benign-appearing epithelial cells on FNAC had malignant outcome in 45.0%

    of cases (3 Papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) and 6 SCC)

    • Cysts containing epithelial cells with atypical cytological features, had malignant outcome in 79.1%

    of cases (1 PTC, 33 SCC)

    • Correlation identified no false positive cases of SCC and 12 false negatives

    • 10/12 (83.3%) were a result of sampling inadequacies

    • 2/12 (16.7%) were found on review to contain suspicious cells that were overlooked/misinterpreted

    • One case clinically thought to be a BrCC and reported as such, contained atypical keratinised

    cells (Fig 4A)

    • One case contained hyperchromatic, crowded groups, that mimicked lympho-histiocytic

    aggregates exhibiting crush artefact. On review these were considered to represent a malignant

    infiltrate (Fig 4B)

    Conclusion

    The significant overlap in both patient demographics and cytological

    presentation of benign and malignant squamous lesions of H&N dictates a

    cautious approach to FNA reporting.

    In our series, this is reflected in high specificity for a malignant or suspicious

    diagnosis but a significant proportion of cases with an atypical/indeterminate

    report that are found to be SCC on follow-up.

    Confirmatory histological follow-up of squamous lesions with FNAC 2010 – 2015

    n =

    Branchial cleft cyst 34 Thyroglossal duct cyst 7 Epidermal inclusion (sebaceous) cyst 7 Cyst (NOS) 12 Pilomatrixoma 2 Reactive lymphadenopathy 2 Negative, NMCS 3 SCC* 175 *Age range 21-97 years; median age 64; F:M ratio 1:4.3 Table 1: Confirmed outcomes of FNAC cases reported to contain a squamous component

    Heinrich Crous1,2 (heinrich_crous@snp.com.au) and Paul W Shield1,2 (pw.shield@qut.edu.au); 1Cytology Department, Sullivan Nicolaides Pathology, 24 Hurworth St, Bowen Hills 4006; 2Faculty of Health, School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane 4000.

    References 1. Fine needle aspiration cytlogy of head and neck disease: advantages and limitations. Diagn

    Histopathol 2010;16(6):287-294. 2. Sira J, Makura ZGG. Differential diagnosis of cystic neck lesions. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2011; 120:

    409-413.

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    0-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80-89 90-97

    2.6

    14.3

    16.9

    10.4

    26.0

    13.0 13.0

    2.6 1.3

    0.00.0 0.0 0.2 0.2

    11.1

    24.1

    27.1

    22.5

    11.5

    3.2

    %

    Patient age (years)

    Age distribution of confirmed benign epithelial-lined cysts and Squamous cell carcinoma cases.

    % all epithelial-lined cystic lesions, n = 77 % SCC cases, n = 494

    Fig.1: Comparative prevalence of confirmed malignancies sampled by FNA

    Fig.2: Comparative prevalence of confirmed benign squamous-lined cystic lesion and confirmed SCC per decade of life, sampled by FNA

    0

    10

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    Negative Indeterminate/ Atypical

    Suspicious/ Malignant

    Non-diagnostic

    55.6

    6.7

    29.1

    8.6 2.1

    71.0

    99.8

    17.7

    %

    FNAC reporting categories for H&N masses by confirmed malignant outcomes per category

    Reporting category percentage Risk of Malignancy

    Introduction

    Fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is an accurate rapid low intervention

    diagnostic technique for investigating mass lesions of the head and neck (H&N)

    region. Reliable FNA diagnosis may obviate the need for surgical intervention.

    However, the accuracy of FNA may be compromised by both collection and

    interpretive error. Squamous lesions pose a particular challenge in the H&N. They

    may represent either benign congenital cysts, such as branchial cleft cysts and

    thyroglossal duct cysts, acquired benign cysts or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).

    Significant overlap between benign and malignant FNA morphology often prevents

    cytological distinction between these entities. Furthermore the cystic nature of

    benign and many malignant lesions makes representative sampling difficult.1,2

    We reviewed our recent experience with squamous lesions of the H&N to determine

    the accuracy of FNA in this setting and to identify problem areas.

    Methods

    We reviewed all H&N FNA cases (2010-2015), excluding thyroid and salivary gland,

    and correlated them with follow-up histology &/or FNA results. Cases with discrepant

    FNA-Histology results were reviewed and problem areas, causes of incorrect

    diagnoses (false negative (FN) or false positive (FP)) and the root cause of these

    errors were investigated.

    Results

    Fig.3: Comparative Risk of Malignancy by FNAC reporting categories

    A B Fig.4: A: False Negative of FNAC reported as Branchial cleft cyst. Small, dyskeratotic cells in a necrotic background misinterpreted (Papanicolaou stain, intermediate and high power magnification). B: False Negative FNAC reported as a Negative lymph node. Hyperchromatic, crowded groups of poorly differentiated malignant cells were interpreted as lympho-histiocytic groups with crush/smearing artefact (Papanicolaou stain, intermediate and high power magnification).

    • 3,231 cases were reported. Of these 941 (29.1%) were confirmed to be

    malignant on follow-up

    • SCC was the most common malignancy, representing 42.1% of confirmed

    malignancies (Figure 1)

    • In total 557(17.2%) of FNAs were reported with a squamous component:

    163 Negative for malignancy (29.3%), 57 Atypical/Indeterminate squamous

    lesions (10.2%) and 337 cases suspicious for/consistent with SCC (60.5%)

    • Follow-up was available for 242 cases (43.4%). (Table 1): 67 (27.7%) were

    benign and 175 (72.3%) confirmed as SCC

    • There was significant overlap the age range of benign and malignant

    lesions, particularly in the 4th, 5th and 6th decades (Figure 2)

    Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of squamous lesions of the Head and Neck

    mailto:heinrich_crous@snp.com.au mailto:pw.shield@qut.edu.au