Engage: getting on with Government 2.0 Nicholas Gruen Government 2.0 Taskforce 24 Feb 2010...

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  • Engage: getting on with Government 2.0

    Nicholas Gruen Government 2.0 Taskforce

    24 Feb 2010Parliament House

  • *OutlineGovernment 2.0 its not the technologyTowards collaborative intelligenceWeb 2.0 platforms as public goodsTurbocharging the ecology of reputationInformation from the peripheryThe two tranches of Government 2.0Online engagementPublic sector informationHow are we going?Not as well as the bestHow we can join the bestGovernment 2.0, coming ready or not

  • *What is web 2.0Web 1.0 was Point to point e-mail Broadcast firm to customer (and back) - websitesWeb 2.0 is collaborative webGoogle 1998 a collaborative siteWikipedia 2001 the community writes an encyclopaediaBlogs early 2000s self-publishing and discussionFacebook 2004 social networkingTwitter 2006 new communications platform

  • What characterises Web 2.0?Web 2.0 isnt fancy technology The technology is simple and ubiquitousWeb 2.0 is a culture change Collaborate dont control Improvise, share, playUsers build value, the technology can let them inBe modular: use others stuff, let them use yoursBuild for user value - monetise later

  • What characterises Government 2.0?Government 2.0 isnt fancy technology The technology is simple and ubiquitousGovernment 2.0 is a culture change Collaborate dont control Improvise, share, playUsers build value, the technology can let them inBe modular: use others stuff, let them use yoursBuild for user value bureaucratic drivers can come later

  • What is government 2.0?Web 2.0 platforms are public goodsGoogle 1998 a collaborative siteWikipedia 2001 the community writes an encyclopaediaBlogs early 2000s self-publishing and discussionFacebook 2004 social networkingTwitter 2006 new communications platformAnd governments exist to build public goodsYet Government didnt build any of themNor did existing firms or NFPs

  • What is government 2.0?How can governement/large organisations respond?Adapt the new toolsExplore the potential for openness to optimise missionYoure sitting on platforms of huge social value PSIBuild new platforms/public goods

  • *Why does web 2.0 matter?Organisation without organisationsWeb 2.0 slashes cost of new social formationsMakes connections of all kinds Informational, social, organisationalCollaborations of all kinds for purposesEconomic - Social - Cultural Political\Reduces hierarchy permits experimentation, improvisation From anywhere, by anyoneBy massively lowering the cost of Failure meetup.comExperimentation - GoogleBy turbocharging the market for reputationTanta is quoted by the Federal US Reserve Steve Randy Waldman quoted by Paul Krugman

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    Identity

    Contribution

    Reputation AuthorityWhy does web 2.0 matter?

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  • *Web 2.0 makes connections?

  • Whats in it for government The National Library Newspaper digitisation projectSite has run 24/7 since launch in 200723% of correctors are overseasOver 7 mil lines of text correctedJulie Hempenstall has corrected over 300,000 of them!

  • *Designing a websiteThe old way =>Management => employees => clients => specs => tender The new way =>Management => employees => clients => specs => tender With hacking events throughoutUnleashing the power of play, of associationBetween ideas and perspectives Between peopleBetween agencies

  • Public sector informationInformation is specialThe internets capacity to disseminate and transform it make it a potential public goodIf it already exists economic efficiency and equity says we shouldnt lock it down, shouldnt try to sell it againA national resource to be managed for public purposesHaving been vigorous in taking the wrong turn in the 1980srequiring higher cost recovery from its information-agenciesAustralia has taken the lead on this In 2001 geospatial information distributed at marginal cost (generally zero cost)In 2005 ABS likewise

  • Find, Play, Share1.If it cant be spidered or indexed, it doesnt exist;2.If it isnt available in open and machine readable format, it cant engage;3.If a legal framework doesnt allow it to be repurposed, it doesnt empower.

  • Play, show, tell

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  • *Public sector information

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  • *http://specials-leader.whereilive.com.au/maps/Melbourne-swoop-hot-spots.php

  • Does your agency have useful dataRelease it and find out!

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  • Central findingAustralia has some of the worlds best examples of Government 2.0Sydneys Powerhouse Museum first to use FlikrFuture Melbourne Wiki was a world leaderBut other countries are taking whole of government action to transform their policies and their institutionsUKUS New Zealand

  • *A Declaration on Open Government Online engagement by public servants should be enabled and encouraged. Robust professional discussion benefits their agencies, their professional development, and the Australian public; Public sector information is a national resourcereleasing as much of it on as permissive terms as possible maximises its value and reinforces democracy;Open engagement at all levels of government is integral to promoting an informed, connected and democratic community, to public sector reform, innovation and best use of the national investment in broadband.

  • Other recommendations Establish a lead agency to coach, enable, advocate and co-ordinate effortUse Information Commissioner to deliver accountability to the open government policy Encourage Agencies to engage and innovate online Encourage public servants to engage online

  • New APSC GuidelinesWeb 2.0 provides public servants with unprecedented opportunities to open up government decision making and implementation to contributions from the community. In a professional and respectful manner, APS employees should engage in robust policy conversations. Equally, as citizens, APS employees should also embrace the opportunity to add to the mix of opinions contributing to sound, sustainable policies and service delivery approaches. Employees should also consider carefully whether they should identify themselves as either an APS employee or an employee of their agency. There are some ground rules. The APS Values and Code of Conduct, including Public Service Regulation 2.1, apply to working with online media in the same way as when participating in any other public forum. The requirements include: being apolitical, impartial and professional; behaving with respect and courtesy, and without harassment;dealing appropriately with information, recognising that some information needs to remain confidential; delivering services fairly, effectively, impartially and courteously to the Australian public; being sensitive to the diversity of the Australian public; taking reasonable steps to avoid conflicts of interest; making proper use of Commonwealth resources; upholding the APS Values and the integrity and good reputation of the APS.APS employees need to ensure that they fully understand the APS Values and Code of Conduct and how they apply to official or personal communications. If in doubt, they should stop and think about whether to comment and what to say, refer to the Code of Conduct, consult their agencys policies, seek advice from someone in authority in their agency, or consult the Ethics Advisory Service in the Australian Public Service Commission.Agencies may find it helpful to provide guidance and training to employees in using ICT resources, including personal use, the use of social media, and any rules or policies about representing their agency online. It would be particularly helpful to workshop scenarios around some of the more complex or grey issues that arise for employees in deciding whether and how to participate online, in the performance of their duties or otherwise, consistent with the above principles.

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  • PSI recommendations Ensure the default for PSI is FindableAgencies to publish comprehensive schedules of PSI to be audited by the ICMachine readable and transformableGratis (free as in beer)Libre (free as in speech)Unless it is kept confidential for good reasons of PrivacyConfidentiality Security Which are agreed by the Information Commissioner

    Accelerate take-up with data.gov.au

    So it becomes an increasingly valuable public good A pre-competitive platform for use, adding value and innovating

  • *Enthusiasm countsComplacency isnt an optionTake a look at Sidewiki . . .

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  • *Ubiquitous Computing: the connected societyTriangulation: Putting together 2+2Location plus voice recognitionplus history plus context

    Seniors green man time

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