Elementary Teaching + Learning April 14, 2015. Agenda I.English Language Learner Services...

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Transcript of Elementary Teaching + Learning April 14, 2015. Agenda I.English Language Learner Services...

  • Slide 1
  • Elementary Teaching + Learning April 14, 2015
  • Slide 2
  • Agenda I.English Language Learner Services II.Refining our Framework for Blended Learning III.Organizational Updates
  • Slide 3
  • Beyond a Strong Core How to implement MTSS with English Learners
  • Slide 4
  • Review of Previous Learning ELL instruction is part of Tier 1 Instruction ELL is not a reading group ELL is not an intervention ELL instruction is meant to be aligned to both the content classroom and the CCSS ELL instruction is organized by grade-level
  • Slide 5
  • Todays Objectives Define and describe a rich language learning environment What it is What it is not Identify factors that will guide decisions for scheduling future ELL instruction in your school
  • Slide 6
  • Language Instruction Educational Program (LIEP) Time and Materials Basic guidance for spectrum of English proficiency language levels.
  • Slide 7
  • Goal Create a rich language learning environment that will empower English learners to become academically proficient in the English language. Beyond Time and Materials Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 On Grade Level
  • Slide 8
  • Current Challenges Mandates to serve 100% of ELL roster Highly Effective Instruction
  • Slide 9
  • UNDERSTANDING ELL RESEARCH
  • Slide 10
  • The changing face of ELL Education The influence of the CCSS Mandates to provide service to 100% of ELLs Former ESL instruction TESOL standards Focus on language acquisition, form and function Support in cultural acculturation factors Changing immigrant demographic influences by region
  • Slide 11
  • Geographic Influence of ELL Education
  • Slide 12
  • Lack of adequate or appropriate research ELL is a newcomer in the field of education Lack of researchers with degrees in ESL Education Research done by monolingual researchers on monolingual students applied to work with ELs Initial research on ESL education originated from researchers in gateway areas of the US This research focused on Spanish bilingual education issues
  • Slide 13
  • Considerations for applying research Majority of research focuses on Spanish bilingual education DMPS has 100+ languages Demographic student factors 2 nd and 3 rd generation students Native language literacy of your student population
  • Slide 14
  • Rich Language Learning Environment What do students need? Physical factors Adequate instructional time Equitable teaching space as defined by the OCR The district will assess the extent to which alternative language program classrooms are comparable to classrooms in the regular education program including size, noise level, and number of teachers per room, and will provide additional space identified by the assessment. Visual supports and labels Access to technology
  • Slide 15
  • Rich Language Learning Environment What do ELL teachers need? Adequate time to teach a complete lesson Planning time for ELL teacher o Many ELL teachers are teaching 5 grade levels, and next year will teach 6 levels Opportunities for ELL teacher to access literacy data and collaborate with classroom teachers on weekly objectives and assessment. Communication and an equal voice about the sequencing of instructional topics
  • Slide 16
  • CREATING A RICH LANGUAGE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT Push-in or Pull-out
  • Slide 17
  • Defining Push-in and Pull-out Push-in Co-teaching Pull-out separate classroom
  • Slide 18
  • Benefits to Push-In (Co-teaching) for ELs Decrease of marginalized status in the schools (Theoharis, 2007). Increase of social language as they interact with native English peers (Abdallah, 2009). Dont miss out on valuable instruction (Dove & Honigsfeld, 2010). Classroom teachers can gain professional development in ways to scaffold learning for ELs (Pawan, 2008)
  • Slide 19
  • Challenges to Push-In (Co-teaching) for ELs Very little research exists on co-teaching for ELL instruction (Bell & Baecher, 2012). Co-teaching does not allow support for lower level ELs (McClure & Taylor, 2010). Lack of knowledge of English learners among content area teachers (Bell & Baecher, 2012) Effective co-teaching is dependent on time for collaboration with each grade level, teacher personality factors, similar pedagogical approach, mutual respect and equity during instruction, equal understanding of language acquisition stages (Friend, 2008; Friend & Cook, 2010). Instructional time is not shared equally (Arkoudis, 2006; Creese, 2006). In many studies, specific language-learning strategies were lost in general classroom instruction (Bell & Baecher, 2012).
  • Slide 20
  • Benefits to Pull-Out model Els more likely to find a sense of safety and lower affective filter, resulting in greater risk-taking and language production (Goldenberg, 2008). Receive instruction targeted to their language level (Harklau, 1999). Promotes greater oral discourse opportunities for newcomers and low-level students (Honigsfeld, 2009). Acclimate to home school culture while affirmed in maintaining aspects of their native culture (Olsen, 2008). ELs benefit from instruction in a smaller group that the content classroom, with unique adaptations to the curriculum, which ELL teachers are able to offer (Honigsfeld, 2009). Better model in schools with high number of English Learners and limited number of ELL teachers (Council of Great City Schools, 2014).
  • Slide 21
  • Challenges to Pull-out with ELs Time needed to travel to ELL classroom Lack of access to content area information (Dove & Honigsfeld, 2010). Inadequate opportunities to interact in English with native English speaking peers (Theoharis, 2007). Marginalization of students (Theoharis, 2007).
  • Slide 22
  • Pull-out classrooms
  • Slide 23
  • What research says about language level and environment ELL Classroom General Classroom Level 1Level 2Level 3 Low Level 4s High Level 4sLevel 5Level 6 Language Proficiency Levels
  • Slide 24
  • Call for new ways of thinking DMPS is growing, and challenges are increasing Requires creative, flexible ways of finding solutions Imperative that we do not sacrifice quality of education to fit a mandate or schedule
  • Slide 25
  • Discussion In the session hand-out, refer to Guiding Questions for your decision-making process Left column factors that contribute to a rich language learning environment With your school, discuss what a rich language learning environment will look in your school
  • Slide 26
  • Refining our Framework for Blended Learning Outcome: How does Blended Learning enable personalization and support our work with SRG?
  • Slide 27
  • Defining Blended Learning What is Blended Learning? Pg. 17 of Maximizing Competency Education and Blended Learning: Insights from Experts Scenario: A stakeholder (i.e. parent, board member, community member) approaches you to discuss blended learning. They ask what Blended Learning is and how this approach is changing our work in the classroom. Craft a 3-4 sentence response.
  • Slide 28
  • Blended Learning as GPS Destination: Success Blended Learning as GPS Destination: Success Pg. 10 of Mean What You Say: Defining and Integrating Personalized, Blended and Competency Education.
  • Slide 29
  • Connect.The. Dots Three terms that will significantly impact our work with SRG: 1.Body of Evidence 2.Multiple Opportunities 3.Clearly defined learning targets/outcomes How do these 3 terms connect to your reading on blended learning?
  • Slide 30
  • Framework for Blended
  • Slide 31
  • Framework for Blended: 1 st Steps Equipping our elementary classrooms with student devices Infrastructure Equipping our elementary classrooms with student devices Infrastructure
  • Slide 32
  • Framework for Blended: 1 st Steps Systems of Support KITE Training Modules Small-Group Technology Support Sessions Tech Study Halls Onsite PD Systems of Support KITE Training Modules Small-Group Technology Support Sessions Tech Study Halls Onsite PD
  • Slide 33
  • Framework for Blended: Next Steps Development of a Digital Portfolio for adaptive and online content A Standards- Reference System Development of a Digital Portfolio for adaptive and online content A Standards- Reference System
  • Slide 34
  • Learning from DC Public Schools Part of the challenge facing DCPS is to find the right balance between providing oversight and letting schools experiment on their own, between approving vendors to ensure quality and letting schools use the tools that are best for them, and between uniting the districts efforts and keeping room for innovation. ~ Blended Learning in DC Public Schools How one District is Reinventing its Classrooms (Lautzenheiser and Hochleitner, January 2014)
  • Slide 35
  • The entire digital education landscape is still new and undeveloped, with schools and districts across the country trying to figure out which tools and models work best for their students. ~ Blended Learning in DC Public Schools How one District is Reinventing its Classrooms (Lautzenheiser and Hochleitner, January 2014)