Elementary Functions Euler¢â‚¬â„¢s Equation The value of...

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Transcript of Elementary Functions Euler¢â‚¬â„¢s Equation The value of...

  • Elementary Functions Part 5, Advanced Trigonometry

    Lecture 5.7a, Euler’s Marvelous Formula

    Dr. Ken W. Smith

    Sam Houston State University

    2013

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 1 / 14

    Euler’s Equation

    The value of complex numbers was recognized but poorly understood during the late Renaissance period (1500-1700 AD.) The number system was explicitly studied in the late 18th century. Euler used i for the square root of −1 in 1779. Gauss used the term “complex” in the early 1800’s.

    The complex plane (“Argand diagram” or “Gauss plane”) was introduced in a memoir by Argand in Paris in 1806, although it was implicit in the doctoral dissertation of Gauss in 1799 and in work of Caspar Wessel around the same time.

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 2 / 14

    Euler’s Equation

    Notice the following remarkable fact that if

    z =

    √ 3

    2 +

    1

    2 i = cos

    π

    6 + i sin

    π

    6

    then z3 = i. (Multiply it out & see!) Thus z12 = 1 and so z is a twelfth root of 1. Now the polar coordinate form for z is r = 1, θ = π6 , that is, z is exactly one-twelfth of the way around the unit circle. z is a twelfth root of 1 and it is one-twelfth of the way around the unit circle. This is not a coincidence! DeMoivre apparently noticed this and proved (by induction, using sum of angles formulas) that if n is an integer then

    (cos θ + i sin θ)n = cosnθ + i sinnθ. (1)

    Thus exponentiation, that is raising a complex number to some power, is equivalent to multiplication of the arguments. Somehow the angles in the complex number act like exponents.

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 3 / 14

    Euler’s Equation

    Euler would explain why that was true. Using the derivative and infinite series, he would show that

    eiθ = cos θ + i sin θ (2)

    By simple laws of exponents, (eiz)n = einz and so Euler’s equation explains DeMoivre formula.

    This explains the “coincidence” we noticed with the complex number z = cos π6 + i sin

    π 6 which is one-twelfth of the way around the unit circle;

    raising z to the twelfth power will simply multiply the angle θ by twelve and move the point z to the point with angle 2π: (1, 0) = 1 + 0i.

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 4 / 14

  • Trig functions in terms of the exponential function

    Euler’s formula eiθ = cos θ + i sin θ

    allows us to write the exponential function in terms of the two basic trig functions, sine and cosine. We may then use Euler’s formula to find a formula for cos z and sin z as a sum of exponential functions. By Euler’s formula, with input −z,

    e−iz = cos(−z) + i sin(−z) = cos(z)− i sin(z). Add the expressions for eiz and e−iz to get

    eiz + e−iz = 2 cos(z)

    and so

    cos z = eiz + e−iz

    2 . (3)

    If we subtract the equation e−iz = cos z − i sin z from Euler’s equation and then divide by 2i, we have a formula for sine:

    sin z = eiz − e−iz

    2i . (4)Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 5 / 14

    Trig functions in terms of the exponential function

    We wrote the exponential function in terms of cosine and sine

    eiθ = cos θ + i sin θ

    and then wrote the trig functions in terms of the exponential function!

    cos z = eiz + e−iz

    2

    sin z = eiz − e−iz

    2i

    The exponential and trig functions are very closely related. Trig functions are, in some sense, really exponential functions in disguise!

    And conversely, the exponential functions are trig functions!

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 6 / 14

    Some worked examples.

    Let’s try out some applications of Euler’s formula. Here are some worked problems.

    Put the complex number z = eπi in the “Cartesian” form z = a+ bi.

    Solution. z = eπi = 1(cos(π) + i sin(π)) = 1(−1 + 0i) = −1

    It seems remarkable that if we combine the three strangest math constants, e, i and π we get

    eπi = −1.

    Some rewrite this in the form

    eπi + 1 = 0

    (often seen on t-shirts for engineering clubs or math clubs.)

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 7 / 14

    Some worked examples.

    Put the complex number z = 2e 13π 6 i in the “Cartesian” form z = a+ bi.

    Solution. z = 2e

    13π 6 i = 2 cos(13π6 ) + 2i sin(

    13π 6 ) = 2 cos(

    π 6 ) + 2i sin(

    π 6 ) =

    √ 3 + i.

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 8 / 14

  • Some worked examples.

    Put the complex number z = 18 + 26i in the “polar” form z = reiθ where r, θ ∈ R and both r and θ are positive.

    Solution. The modulus of z = 18 + 26i is 182 + 262 = 1000. So the polar coordinate form of z = 18 + 26i is

    √ 103 eiθ where

    θ = arctan(2618). (The angle θ is about 0.96525166319.)

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 9 / 14

    Some worked examples.

    Find a cube root of the number z = 18+ 26i and put this cube root in the “Cartesian” form z = a+ bi. (Use a calculator and get an exact value for this cube root.

    Using the previous problem, we write z = 18 + 26i = √ 103 eiθ where

    θ = arctan(2618).

    The cube root of √ 103 eiθ is

    √ 10 ei

    θ 3

    (The angle θ3 is about 0.3217505544.) Using a calculator, we can see that this comes out to approximately

    √ 10 cos(

    θ

    3 ) + i √ 10 sin(

    θ

    3 ) = 3 + i.

    One could check by computing (3 + i)3 and see that we indeed get 18 + 26i.

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 10 / 14

    Some worked examples.

    Find a complex number z such that ln(−1) = z.

    Solutions. Since −1 in polar coordinate form is −1 = eiπ then z = πi is a solution to ln(−1).

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 11 / 14

    Some worked examples.

    A question found on the internet: What is ii?

    We can find one answer if we write the base i in polar form i = e π 2 i.

    (More carefully, we might note that i = e π 2 i+2πki, for any integer k.)

    Then ii = (e π 2 i)i = e

    π 2 i2 = e−

    π 2

    ≈ 0.207879576350761908546955619834978770033877841631769608075135...

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 12 / 14

  • Complex numbers v. Real numbers

    Here are some things one can do with the real numbers:

    1 Show that f(x) = sinx is periodic with period 2π, that is, f(x+ 2π) = f(x).

    2 Find an infinite set of numbers, x, such that sin(x) = 1/2.

    3 Find a number x such that ex = 200.

    4 Compute ln(2).

    Here are some things that require complex numbers:

    1 Show that f(x) = ex is periodic with period 2πi, that is, f(x+ 2πi) = f(x).

    2 Find an infinite set of numbers, x, such that ex = 1/2.

    3 Find a number x such that sin(x) = 200.

    4 Compute ln(−2).

    These are all topics for further exploration in a course in complex variables. Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 13 / 14

    Last Slide!

    It is appropriate that we end our series of precalculus lectures with a presentation of Euler’s marvelous formula, which brings together both the trigonometric functions and the exponential functions into one form!

    The applications of this formula appear in all the technology around us, and simplify many complicated mathematical computations!

    eiθ = cos θ + i sin θ

    (End)

    Smith (SHSU) Elementary Functions 2013 14 / 14