Easa Part 66 - Module 11.07 - Equipment and Furnishings

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Easa Part 66 - Module 11.07 - Equipment and Furnishings

Transcript of Easa Part 66 - Module 11.07 - Equipment and Furnishings

  • B1 Mod 11.07 .doc Issue No 12/07/15 Page 1-1

    JAR 66 CATEGORY

    MODULE 11.07

    EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS

    uk engineering

    CONTENTS

    1 EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS .............................................. 1-3

    1.1 EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS ..................................... 1-3

    1.2 SEAT, HARNESSES AND BELTS ..................................................... 1-3

    1.3 CABIN LAYOUTS ........................................................................... 1-5

    1.4 CABIN FURNISHINGS ..................................................................... 1-7

    1.5 CABIN ENTERTAINMENT ................................................................ 1-7

    1.6 GALLEY INSTALLATIONS ............................................................... 1-8

    1.7 CARGO HANDLING AND RETENTION EQUIPMENT ............................ 1-8

    1.8 CARGO RETENTION EQUIPMENT .................................................... 1-10

    1.9 AIRSTAIRS ................................................................................... 1-11

  • B1 Mod 11.07 .doc Issue No 12/07/15 Page 1-2

    uk engineering

    JAR 66 CATEGORY B1

    MODULE 11.07

    EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS

    PAGE INTENTIONALLY

    BLANK

  • B1 Mod 11.07 .doc Issue No 12/07/15 Page 1-3

    JAR 66 CATEGORY

    MODULE 11.07

    EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS

    uk engineering

    1 EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS 1.1 EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS On every aircraft, there can be found some form of emergency equipment. This can vary from a simple seat belt and a fire extinguisher on a micro-light aircraft, to a large list of equipment fitted to a commercial airliner. For example, a medium sized aircraft like the Fokker 50 carries over thirty different types of safety equipment. The list of equipment fitted in a 450+ seater Boeing 747-400, will include items such as seat belts, lifejackets, first-aid kits, fire extinguishers, oxygen sets, torches etc. The types of safety equipment that must be carried on any specific flight, are laid down in the Air Navigation Order, (ANO), schedule No.4. This list covers a wide range of safety equipment, from mooring equipment for seaplanes to cookers and snow shovels for arctic operation. JAR 25 - Large Aeroplanes, details amongst others, the requirements for the design and performance of safety and other equipment, ranging from size of access doors and emergency exits and the numbers required for each size of aircraft, width of cabin aisles, number of seats abreast. The list is endless, but the JAR 25 regulations are an excellent source of information. Some of the items of equipment carried may seem to be of little use, but each has a specific purpose in some emergency or other. For example the large axe carried on passenger aircraft is to enable any trapped passengers and crew to cut their own way out of the cabin. Smoke hoods are to permit the cabin staff to help passengers leave the aircraft, even if the cabin is full of smoke. Portable oxygen is used in the cases of passengers feeling ill, in addition to the 'drop-out' masks, which activated if the cabin pressurisation has failed. 1.2 SEAT, HARNESSES AND BELTS All seat belts have to restrain the passenger (or crew) in their seat, even during a crash landing. The seat to which the belt is attached, has to hold securely in the seat rails, even during the high 'g' loadings experienced in an emergency landing. The seat rails are a continuous extrusion with circular cut-outs, which allow the seats to be attached and locked at different seat spacing, (pitch). The pitch is usually in, one inch or 25mm increments.

  • B1 Mod 11.07 .doc Issue No 12/07/15 Page 1-4

    uk engineering

    JAR 66 CATEGORY B1

    MODULE 11.07

    EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS

    Seat Tracks Figure

    Aircraft seats can be divided into three main groups; passenger seats, flight attendant seats and flight deck crew seats. Passenger seats are usually part of multiple units, although in first class and executive seating, some individual seat units can be found. Most passenger seats are manufactured from aluminium alloy tube, which is riveted and welded to form the frame with supporting legs and braces, individual reclining seat backs and integral tables. Flight Attendant seats are usually more utilitarian than passenger seats and can be mounted on seat tracks, the aircraft wall structure or, as in the ATR-72, to a sliding assembly that stows away without taking up passenger space, as shown below. They will all normally be fitted with a full harness seat belt, compared with the 'lap strap' assemblies for the passengers.

    Attendant Seat Figure

  • B1 Mod 11.07 .doc Issue No 12/07/15 Page 1-5

    JAR 66 CATEGORY

    MODULE 11.07

    EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS

    uk engineering

    The seats in the flight deck have to be the most comfortable on the aircraft, because it is laid down in many airline regulations that there must be a full crew in the cockpit, at all times. The crew must be as 'sharp' and attentive during the landing as they were at take-off many hours ago. Flight deck seats will have many different axes of movement such as height, reach, backrest tilt, lumbar support, arm rest height, etc. Most of the larger seats will have some of these movements powered by electrical actuators. These seats will also have at least a four point harness assembly and, in many cases these days, five point harnesses, with a lower crotch strap

    Crew Seat

    Figure 1.3 CABIN LAYOUTS The layout of the cabin is a compromise between the builder/designer, who would like it to contain as many paying passengers as possible, and the airworthiness authorities, who wish to limit the maximum number of passengers. This maximum has to be the number that can be evacuated from inside the cabin, through 50% of available exits, in 90 seconds. This ruling dictates the number and size of the exits, the width of the aisles and, most importantly, the number of seats. As can be seen from the diagrams below, the position of the exits varies with the design of the aircraft.

  • B1 Mod 11.07 .doc Issue No 12/07/15 Page 1-6

    uk engineering

    JAR 66 CATEGORY B1

    MODULE 11.07

    EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS

    Seating And Emergency Exits Figure

    The majority of passenger aircraft have seats in pairs or triple units with one or two aisles. The wide body Boeing 747 usually has two aisles with triple units outboard and a pair of double units between the two aisles, giving 10 abreast seating, the normal maximum. The remainder of passenger cabins are fairly standard with overhead stowages. Passenger service units (PSU) are located on the bottom of the overhead stowage lockers and normally contain reading lights, call buttons, seat belt and NO SMOKING warnings and, on aircraft that are equipped with them, drop-out oxygen masks. Galleys can be found in a variety of places in the cabin, at the front the rear, and occasionally, centrally, where they can be used to divide the different classes of passenger. They have their own power supply for heating, lighting and ventilation. For maintenance the galley units are removable, as are all other dividing partitions as well as the overhead units and PSUs.

  • B1 Mod 11.07 .doc Issue No 12/07/15 Page 1-7

    JAR 66 CATEGORY

    MODULE 11.07

    EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS

    uk engineering

    Galleys are also supplied with their own water supplies to permit the making of hot drinks, washing-up etc. This means they require connections to both fresh (potable) water and grey (waste) water from the aircrafts own systems. Some galleys are fitted in the under floor areas of larger aircraft, which necessitates the installation of lifts between floors. 1.4 CABIN FURNISHINGS As with galleys, all furnishings have to be easily removable, not only to allow the engineers access during deep maintenance, but also to permit various items to be changed at irregular intervals due to "fair wear and tear". This can include worn carpets, torn seat covers, cracked plastic cabin wall skins, ceiling panels and damaged overhead bin doors. All of the previous items are attached by 'quick release' fittings of varying types. Shown below are examples of an overhead bin, a wall panel and a ceiling panel.

    Cabin Furnishings Figure

    1.5 CABIN ENTERTAINMENT Cabin entertainment varies greatly depending upon the aircraft type, (and age), as well as the airline operating the aircraft. It can vary from little more than 'music' played over the cabin P.A. system on smaller aircraft, through to the most common installations of films, navigation information and cabin safety briefings displayed on multiple television monitors located throughout the cabin. Some modern aircraft have, fitted to their higher class seats, a complete 'entertainment experience', which can consist of individual viewing screens either attached to the seat back of the unit in front, or individually seat arm located. These screens can offer a multiple and individual video selection; computer games; musical videos with stereo sound on headphones and, in business class, access to a satellite telephone and other business tools.

  • B1 Mod 11.07 .doc Issue No 12/07/15 Page 1-8

    uk engineering

    JAR 66 CATEGORY B1

    MODULE 11.07

    EQUIPMENT AND FURNISHINGS

    1.6 GALLEY INSTALLATIONS Galleys, as has been mentioned earlier, have to be modular units so that they can be removed for maintenance. In the case of technical problems, it mayl also be necessary, some time