Dyslexia Scotland Roadshow Angus 22 May 2012. 

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Transcript of Dyslexia Scotland Roadshow Angus 22 May 2012. 

  • Dyslexia Scotland RoadshowAngus22 May 2012

  • zFsty

  • What is dyslexia?

  • What is dyslexia?Mr Krook, the eccentric marine store dealer, has a wall pasted with hand-written alphabets to try and teach himself to read. The law clerk, Jobling says: read, hell never read. He can make out all the letters separately but he cannot put them together.

  • What is dyslexia?Dyslexia can be described as a continuum of difficulties in learning to read, write and/or spell, which persist despite the provision of appropriate learning opportunities. These difficulties often do not reflect an individuals cognitive abilities and may not be typical of performance in other areas.

  • What is dyslexia?The impact of dyslexia as a barrier to learning varies in degree according to the learning and teaching environment, as there are often associated difficulties such as:

  • What is dyslexia?auditory and/or visual processing of language-based informationphonological awarenessoral language skills and reading fluencyshort-term and working memorysequencing and directionalitynumber skillsorganisational ability

  • What is dyslexia?Dyslexia exists in all cultures and across the range of abilities and socio-economic backgrounds. It is a hereditary, life-long, neurodevelopmental condition. Unidentified, dyslexia is likely to result in low self esteem, high stress, atypical behaviour, and low achievement.

  • What is dyslexia?Learners with dyslexia will benefit from early identification, appropriate intervention and targeted effective teaching, enabling them to become successful learners, confident individuals, effective contributors and responsible citizens.Scottish Government/Dyslexia Scotland/Cross party Group on Dyslexia

  • What is dyslexia?Dyslexia is a processing difference experienced by people of all ages, often characterised by difficulties in literacy.Gavin Reid

  • Some key facts

  • Some key facts

    One person in ten (over 500,000 people in Scotland) is thought to be dyslexic and of these one in four could be severely dyslexic.

  • Some key factsDifficulties can range from mild to severe and individual profiles can be very different, each with strengths and weaknesses.

  • Some key factsDyslexic people often have natural talents, creative abilities and vision.

  • Some key factsDyslexia can occur at any level of intellectual ability.

  • Some key factsDyslexic people can face difficulties in both education and employment

  • Some key facts

    Early recognition, appropriate timely intervention, good structured multi-sensory teaching and additional support for learning contribute to success.

  • General ChecklistFamily history

  • General ChecklistFamily history of difficultiesGood orally but difficulty in writing the answer

  • General ChecklistFamily historyGood orally but difficulty in writing the answerDifficulty with reading/spelling

  • General ChecklistFamily historyGood orally but difficulty in writing the answerDifficulty with reading/spellingLetters/numbers the wrong way round, for example b/d or 15/51

  • General ChecklistReads a word correctly but fails to recognise it further down the page

  • General ChecklistReads a word correctly but fails to recognise it further down the pageSpells a word in different ways

  • General ChecklistReads a word correctly but fails to recognise it further down the pageSpells a word in different waysConfusion of left/right

  • General ChecklistReads a word correctly but fails to recognise it further down the pageSpells a word in different waysConfusion of left/rightClumsy

  • General ChecklistReads a word correctly but fails to recognise it further down the pageSpells a word in different waysConfusion of left/rightClumsyPoor sense of rhythm/rhyme

  • General ChecklistPoor concentration

  • General ChecklistPoor concentrationBadly organised

  • General ChecklistPoor concentrationBadly organisedDifficulty planning stories/essays

  • General ChecklistPoor concentrationBadly organisedDifficulty planning stories/essaysDifficulty taking notes

  • General ChecklistPoor concentrationBadly organisedDifficulty planning stories/essaysDifficulty taking notesDifficulty with time/tenses

  • General ChecklistPoor concentrationBadly organisedDifficulty planning stories/essaysDifficulty taking notesDifficulty with time/tensesCant follow a series of instructions

  • ScreeningDyslexia Scotland:

    Assessing Dyslexia Toolkit

    www.frameworkforinclusion.org/AssessingDyslexia/

  • Areas to look atNutrition

    Visual

    Auditory

    Exercise

  • NutritionA good diet

    Additives?

    Essential fatty acids

  • Visual

  • VisualThe letters go all blurryThe letters move around so I cant tell which is whichThe letters seem to float over the pageThe letters move in and out of the pageThe letters split and go double

  • VisualThe c moved over the r so it looked like another cds and bs sort of get the wrong way roundThe p joined up with the cThe words go all glaryI keep losing my placeBlurring of print

  • Common visual symptomsDifficulty moving from one line to the otherMovement of words or lettersShort visual concentration spanguessing wordsRubbing of eyesHeadaches/migrainesSeeing non-existent blotches or diamonds

  • The rivers effectReading by the Colours: Overcoming Dyslexia and Other Reading Disabilities Helen Irlen

  • The Seesaw effectReading by the Colours: Overcoming Dyslexia and Other Reading Disabilities Helen Irlen

  • The Swirl EffectReading by the Colours: Overcoming Dyslexia and Other Reading Disabilities Helen Irlen

  • Visual

    Coloured overlays, coloured lensesand coloured paper can help.

  • Auditory

  • Some of the problemsDifficulty following sequential directionsDifficulty with dictated informationDifficulty with background noiseSlow to respond to questions or directionsGives inappropriate answers to simple questionsHas or has had a speech problem

  • AuditoryRight temporal lobeLeft temporal lobeCorpus callosum

  • AuditoryLeft hemisphere responsible for sequential, detailed part of language:

    formants > phonemes > words > sentences

  • AuditoryRight hemisphere mainly responsible for

    intonation, pitch, stress pattern

  • AuditoryThe sounds dont always meet up

    The sounds cross

    Background noise gets in the way

  • Sound therapyIt is designed to stimulate the nerve pathways into and within the brain - in particular the areas dealing with language - and thus improve language processing abilities.

  • Exercise

  • Exercise

    Exercises for co-ordination:

  • What does it feel like to be dyslexic?

  • Reading

  • Spelling

  • Spellingovious

  • Spellingovious

    probaly

  • Spellingovious

    probaly

    permant

  • Spellingovious

    probaly

    permant

    competive

  • Spellingovious

    probaly

    permant

    competive

    sporting

  • Spellingobedions

  • Spellingobedions

    herowins

  • Spellingobedions

    herowins

    orthority

  • Spellingobedions

    herowins

    orthority

    lugsureus

  • Spellingobedions

    herowins

    orthority

    lugsureus

    nshore

  • Spellingperchsin

  • Spellingperchsin

    sjest

  • Spellingperchsin

    sjest

    spishus

  • Spellingperchsin

    sjest

    spishus

    enkuriged

  • Spellingperchsin

    sjest

    spishus

    enkuriged

    inagsptabal

  • Spelling Test

  • Spelling Testohot

  • Spelling Testohotwilf

  • Spelling Testohotwilfveresece

  • Spelling Testohotwilfveresecenoinsions

  • Spelling Testohotwilfveresecenoinsionsneurij

  • Spelling Testcloeshon

  • Spelling Testcloeshoncachataball

  • Spelling Testcloeshoncachataballexpnash

  • Spelling Testcloeshoncachataballexpnashtheacher

  • Spelling Testcloeshoncachataballexpnashtheacheroriadanlaty

  • Spelling Testincored

  • Spelling Testincoredobdunses

  • Spelling Testincoredobdunseseriginaligy

  • Spelling Testincoredobdunseseriginaligyextrusurher

  • Spelling Testincoredobdunseseriginaligyextrusurherawkuging

  • Spelling Testexpurpation

  • Spelling Testexpurpationyun

  • Spelling Testexpurpationyuntrininalagy

  • Spelling Testexpurpationyuntrininalagyarecinatatey

  • Spelling Testexpurpationyuntrininalagyarecinatateyxx

  • Spelling Testohot

  • Spelling Testohotwhat

  • Spelling Testohotwhatwilf

  • Spelling Testohotwhatwilfwealth

  • Spelling Testohotwhatwilfwealthveresece

  • Spelling Testohotwhatwilfwealthveresecevarious

  • Spelling Testohotwhatwilfwealthveresecevariousnoinsions

  • Spelling Testohotwhatwilfwealthveresecevariousnoinsionsnonsense

  • Spelling Testohotwhatwilfwealthveresecevariousnoinsionsnonsenseneurij

  • Spelling Testohotwhatwilfwealthveresyvariousnosinsnonsenseneurijencouraged

  • Spelling Testcloeshon

  • Spelling Testcloeshoncollection

  • Spelling Testcloeshon collectioncachatball

  • Spelling Testcl