Dying with Dignity Canada-Ipsos Public Affairs

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    1 2015 Ipsos.

    Dying With Dignity CanadaFebruary 2016

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    2 2015 Ipsos.

    METHODOLOGY

    These are the findings of an Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Dying With DignityCanada.

    For the poll, a sample of 2,530 was surveyed online via Ipsos I-Say panel from

    February 2 to February 5, including samples of:

    n = 400 in BC, n = 300 in AB, n = 250 in Man/Sask, n = 800 in Ontario, n = 350 in

    Quebec, n = 430 in Atlantic Canada (including n = 300 in Nova scotia)

    Quotas and weighting were employed to ensure that the samples national

    composition reflects that of the Canadian population according to census

    information.

    The precision of online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case the

    results are considered accurate to within +/- 2.2 percentage points, 19 times out of

    20, of what the results would have been had all Canadian adults been surveyed.

    The credibility interval will be wider for subsets of the population.

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    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    85% support (51% strongly) the Supreme Courts decision vs. 15% who oppose (7% strongly)

    Turning to the issue of advance consent for physician-assisted dying:

    80% support (44% strongly) assisted death for patients who are competent at the time of the

    request but not competent at the time the request is carried out, as long as the person has a

    diagnosis of a grievous and irremediable medical condition when the request is made. For

    example, if a patient has a diagnosis of dementia and requests to have assistance to die when

    they become bedridden and unable to bathe, shave and toilet themselves, but is no longer

    competent when these conditions arise. 82% support (45% strongly) assisted death for patients who are competent at the time of the

    request but not competent at the time the assisted death is to be carried out. For example, a

    patient and her doctor agree on Friday to schedule an assisted death for the following

    Monday, but over the weekend the patient slips into a coma.

    71% support (33% strongly) assisted death for patients who are competent at the time of the

    request even if they do not have a grievous and irremediable medical condition. For example,a person may wish to write advance instructions specifying that they are to receive an assisted

    death if they have a stroke and are unable to move or communicate, even if they have not

    been diagnosed as being at risk of having a stroke when they write their advance instructions.

    When asked to choose between two distinct options, 64% say assisted dying should be

    available even if the patient is not competent at the time the request is to be carried out vs.

    36% who say the patient should be competent.

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    Detailed FindingsDETAILED FINDINGS

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    Nine in ten (85%) support the Supreme Courts decision to allow physician-assisted dying toindividuals with a grievous and irremediable medical condition that causes enduring sufferingthat is intolerable to the individual, and who clearly consents to the termination of their life.

    SUPPORT OR OPPOSE SUPREME COURT DECISION

    As you may know, the Supreme Court of Canada recently ruled that competent Canadians will soon have the right to a physician's

    assistance to die. Adults with a grievous and irremediable medical condition (due to illness, injury or disability) that causes

    enduring suffering that is intolerable to the individual, and who clearly consent to the termination of their life, will soon have the

    right to a physician's assistance to die. Do you support or oppose the Supreme Court's decision?

    Base: All Respondents n=2530

    51%

    34%

    7% 7%

    Strongly support Somewhat support Somewhat oppose Strongly oppose

    Support 85%

    Oppose 15%

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    6 2015 Ipsos.

    Support is strong across every demographic group studied.

    As you may know, the Supreme Court of Canada recently ruled that competent Canadians will soon have the right to a physician's assistance to die.

    Adults with a grievous and irremediable medical condition (due to illness, injury or disability) that causes enduring suffering that is intolerable to the

    individual, and who clearly consent to the termination of their life, will soon have the right to a physician's assistance to die. Do you support or

    oppose the Supreme Court's decision?

    Base: All Respondents n=2530

    Total

    Gender AGE REGIONHealthcare

    provider

    Physically

    challenged

    Exp or witnessed

    severe suffering

    Exp or witnessed

    dementia

    Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ BC

    AB

    SK/MB

    Ontario

    Quebec

    Atlantic

    Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No

    (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) (A) (B) (Y) (Z) (a) (b) (c) (d)

    Base: All Respondents (n=2530) (n=1065) (n=1465) (n=652) (n=932) (n=946) (n=400) (n=300) (n=250) (n=800) (n=350) (n=430) (n= 156) (n= 2374) (n= 83) (n=2447) (n= 1606) (n=924) (n= 1617) (n= 913)

    Summary

    Support 85% 88% B 83% 85% 85% 86% 86% 88% 83% 84% 87% 86% 83% 85% 92%* 85% 87% b 83% 85% 85%

    Oppose 15% 12% 17% A 15% 15% 14% 14% 12% 17% 16% 13% 14% 17% 15% 8% * 15% 13% 17% a 15% 15%

    SUPPORT OR OPPOSE SUPREME COURT DECISION

    Total

    Likely Voter Federal Vote Religious Identity Church attendance

    Certain

    NotCertain

    Conservative

    Party

    LiberalParty

    NewDemocratic

    Party

    PartiQuebecois

    OtherParty

    Iwouldnot

    vote/don't

    know/undecided

    Atheist/

    Agnostic/Hum

    anist

    Protestantor

    other

    Christian

    Roman

    Catholic

    NoReligious

    Identity

    Don't

    know/Refused

    Regular

    Occasional

    Infrequent/

    Non

    (I) (J) (C) (D) (E) (F) (G) (H) (K) (P) (Q) (T) (U) (V) (W) (X)Base: All Respondents (n=2530) (n=1549) (n=981) ( n=515) (n =1105) (n =291) (n =40) ( n=73) ( n=506) (n=278) (n= 727) (n=626) (n= 576) (n= 90) (n=419) (n=297) (n=1814)

    Summary

    Support 85% 86% 84% 78% 87% C 91% C 92%** 88%* 85% C98%

    PQTU77% 83% P 93% PQU 85% 58% 74% V 92% VW

    Oppose 15% 14% 16% 22% DEH 13% 9% 8% ** 12% * 15% 2% 23% KQT 17% KT 7% K 15% KT 42% WX 26% X 8%

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    Eight in ten (80%) support physician-assisted death for patients who are competent at the time

    of the request but not competent at the time the request is carried out, as long as the person hasa diagnosis of a grievous and irremediable medical condition when the request is made. Two inten (20%) oppose physician-assisted death in this situation.

    SCENARIO 1: COMPETENT AT TIME OF REQUEST BUT NOT COMPETENT

    AT TIME THE REQUEST IS CARRIED OUT, AS LONG AS GRIEVOUS AND

    IRREMEDIABLE MEDICAL CONDITION EXISTS AT TIME OF REQUEST

    Assuming the patient meets all the other criteria for a physician-assisted death, would you support or oppose physician assisted

    death for patients who are competent at the time of the request but not competent at the time the request is carried out, as long

    as the person has a diagnosis of a grievous and irremediable medical condition when the request is made? For example, if a

    patient has a diagnosis of dementia and requests to have assistance to die when they become bedridden and unable to bathe,

    shave and toilet themselves, but is no longer competent when these conditions arise.

    Base: All Respondents n=2530

    44%37%

    12%7%

    Strongly support Somewhat support Somewhat oppose Strongly oppose

    Support 80%

    Oppose 20%

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    8 2015 Ipsos.

    A majority of Canadians in each of these demographic groups supports physician-assisted death in this scenario, including amajority (59%) of those who attend a place of worship on a weekly basis.

    Assuming the patient meets all the other criteria for a physician-assisted death, would you support or oppose physician-assisted

    death for patients who are competent at the time of the request but not competent at the time the request is carried out, as long

    as the person has a diagnosis of a grievous and irremediable medical condition when the request is made? For example, if a

    patient has a diagnosis of dementia and requests to have assistance to die when they become bedridden and unable to bathe,

    shave and toilet themselves, but is no longer competent when these conditions arise.

    Base: All Respondents n=2530

    COMPETENT AT TIME OF REQUEST BUT NOT COMPETENT AT TIME THE REQUEST

    IS CARRIED OUT, AS LONG AS GRIEVOUS AND IRREMEDIABLE MEDICAL

    CONDITION EXISTS AT TIME OF REQUEST

    Total

    Gender AGE REGIONHealthcare

    provider

    Physically

    challenged

    Exp or witnessed

    severe suffering

    Exp or witnessed

    dementia

    Male Female 18-34 35-54 55+ BC

    AB

    SK/MB

    Ontario

    Quebec

    Atlantic

    Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No

    (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) (A) (B) (Y) (Z) (a) (b) (c) (d)

    Base: All Respon