Created by: Marisa Chapa, Antonette Gregory, and Brittany Moorman

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Transcript of Created by: Marisa Chapa, Antonette Gregory, and Brittany Moorman

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Created by: Marisa Chapa, Antonette Gregory, and Brittany Moorman Slide 2 Theory is based on constructivism, Piaget, Dewey, and Vygotsky. Curriculum is not planned but built on childrens interests. A special teacher called an Atelierista works closely with teachers and children. Environment is used to provide a third party teaching approach. Learning is active and project oriented. Programs are provided for 3 months to 6 years of age. The Hundred Languages of Children Slide 3 Emergent Curriculum Short and long term projects Cooperation in both small and large groups Documentation Education is a relationship between three protagonists: child, parent, and teacher Slide 4 Slide 5 Transcriptions of childrens remark and discussions. Photographs of activities around the classroom Art and media representations of experiences. (Group murals, sculptures, painting, and drawings.) Slide 6 Slide 7 Characterized by contemporary knowledge and research of children. This research includes topics such as problem solving among classmates. The curriculum leaves many opportunities for creative thinking as well as exploration by students. Activities vary greatly from units or thematic studies of the American child The projects are taken directly from the basis of academic concern or that of teachers or parents Slide 8 The teacher is considered a co- learner with the child. Teachers plan learning based on childrens interests, helping the child further understand by asking questions and engaging with the child as opposed to sitting back and watching the child learn. The teacher is expected to mutually take part with the child in their learning. The environment is considered a 3 rd teacher in the program model. Slide 9 Reggio is a process not a set curriculum to be implemented. Reggio approach is constructivism and sharing ideas. Projects are the backbone of learning experiences for the teacher and child. Compatible with Piaget, Dewey, Vygotsky, and Gardner Slide 10 Students stay with the same peers and teacher for a three year period allowing educators to become aware of personal rhythms and learning styles of each child. Children are in control of their own learning and must have endless ways to express themselves. Slide 11 The Hundred Languages No way. The hundred is there. The child is made of one hundred. The child has a hundred languages a hundred hands a hundred thoughts a hundred ways of thinking of playing, of speaking. A hundred always a hundred ways of listening of marveling, of loving a hundred joys for singing and understanding a hundred worlds to discover a hundred worlds to invent a hundred worlds to dream. The child has a hundred languages (and a hundred hundred hundred more) but they steal ninety-nine. The school and the culture separate the head from the body. They tell the child: to think without hands to do without head to listen and not to speak to understand without joy to love and to marvel only at Easter and at Christmas. They tell the child: to discover the world already there and of the hundred they steal ninety-nine. They tell the child: that work and play reality and fantasy science and imagination sky and earth reason and dream are things that do not belong together. And thus they tell the child that the hundred is not there. The child says: No way. The hundred is there. -Loris Malaguzzi (translated by Lella Gandini) Founder of the Reggio Emilia Approach Slide 12 Values of the Reggio Emilia Approach to Childhood Education. (2006-2012). Retrieved October 26, 2012, from education.com. Slide 3,5,8 JP Moser Hotel and Chateau. (2012). Retrieved October 27, 2012, from jpmoser.com:.html Slide 1 Early Childhood News. (n.d.). Retrieved October 26, 2012, from earlychildnews.com. Slide 3 Edwards, C. (2011). Table 4.1, Comparing Early Childhood Programs. In G. S. Morrison, Fundamentals of Early Childhood Education, 5/E (pp. 93-94). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson. Slides 2,3 Kennedy, R. (n.d.). privateschool.about.com. Retrieved October 25, 2012, from About.com. Slide 3 Loh, A. (2006, December). Brainy Child:All about Brain Development. Retrieved October 25, 2012, from www.brainy-child.com.www.brainy-child.com Slide 2,5,8 Slide 13 Morrison, G. S. (2011). Chapter 4. In G. S. Morrison, Fundamentals of Early Childhood Education, 5/E (pp. 109 - 112). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson. Slide 1,2,3,5,8 Myers, D. (n.d.). Ideas for the Classroom. Retrieved October 27, 2012, from pinterest.com. Slide 3 Scholastic. (n.d.). Retrieved October 26, 2012, from scholastic.com. Slide 3 Tarr, P. (2001). Design Share. Retrieved October 27, 2012, from designshare.com. Slide 4 Wikipedia: The free encyclopedia. (n.d.). Retrieved October 25, 2012, from www.wikipedia.org.www.wikipedia.org Slide 2,7,8 Hindustan Times. (2012, August 4). Retrieved from hindustantimes.com: http://www.hindustanttimes.com/news-feed/beyondbooks/educational-philosophy-und Slide 5,7 The Innovative Teacher Project. (2012). Retrieved from innovativeteacherproject.org. Slide 11