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Transcript of Copyright © Allyn and Bacon 2003 1Emotion Interaction of four components 1. physiological...

Chapter 9Emotion
Core Concept 9-1
Emotions have evolved to help us respond to important situations and to convey our intentions to others.
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Evolution of Emotions
approach positive situations or people (example: love)
avoid negative or dangerous situations or people (example: fear)
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Emotional Communication
Display rules--permissible ways of expressing emotions in a particular society.
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Counting Emotions
seven or eight basic emotions
complex emotions-blends of basic emotions
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The Emotion Wheel
Core Concept 9-2
Two distinct brain pathways connect the biological structures involved in emotions.
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Biological Basis of Emotions
(1) quick, automatic, unconscious system--deep brain circuits.
(2) slower, more thorough, conscious system--cortex of the brain.
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Emotional Arousal and Performance
moderate arousal--higher performance
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Emotional Intelligence
Recognize other’s emotions
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Cues for Detecting Deception
Other cues in verbal and non-verbal behavior
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Guidelines for Detecting deception
Hiding true feelings--postural shifts, speech errors, nervous gestures, shrugging.
Face is easier to control than the body.
Eye contact--only in a typical truth-teller.
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Polygraph
Assumes people will display physical signs of arousal when lying.
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Core Concept 9-3
Motivation takes many forms, but all involve inferred mental processes that select and direct our behavior.
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Motivation
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Motivation
accounts for variability in behavior.
explains perseverance despite adversity.
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Intrinsic Motivation
Desire to engage in an activity for its own sake--not for some external reward.
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Extrinsic Motivation
Desire to engage in an activity to achieve external consequences or rewards.
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Conscious Motivation
Being aware of the desire to engage in an activity.
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Unconscious Motivation
Being consciously unaware of the desire to engage in an activity.
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Instinct Theory
Now called fixed-action patterns.
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Drive Theory
Biological needs produce a drive to meet that need--reduce the drive.
Homeostasis--body’s need to maintain a balanced state.
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Cognitive Theory
Locus of control--beliefs about the ability to control the events in our lives.
Internal v. external locus of control
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Freud’s Psychodynamic Theory
Two basic desires
Eros-desire for sex
Thanatos-desire for aggression
• Hierarchy – needs occur in priority order
• most biological needs are most basic
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