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  • PiillilfBllijIillllllif '^WMmm

  • UiMiVLKSlTY Zr ILLINOIS LieRAnv

    AT URSANA-CHJLV.^AIwl

    BICKER UBRARY A! CHITECTDRt UNIVERSITY Of ILIIN'

  • NOTICE: Return or renew all Library Malerialsl The Minimum Fee lor

    each Lost Book is $50.00.

    The person charging this material is responsible for its return to the library from which it was withdrawn

    on or betore the Latest Date stamped below.

    Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books are reasons for discipli-

    nary action and may result in dismissal from the University.

    To renew call Telephone Center. 333-8400

    UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAIUIPAIGN

    FEB i\ m

    L16I—O-1096

  • %

    mm

  • Cover Design From Painting

    By Rolph Scarlett

    I OF ILLINOIS

    »PESS 11

    I

  • BEHOLD . . . MAN Umberto Romano

  • UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

    EXHIBITION OF CONTEMPORARY

    AMERICAN PAINTING

    College of Fine and Applied Arts

    LIrbana, Illinois

    Architecture Building

    Sunday, February 27 through Sunday, Ajirii !?, 1949

    THE LIDRARY OF THE

    MAR 3 - 1949

  • BICKER LIBRARY ARCHITECTURI

    JUNIVtKSITY Of ILi-ir.OIS

    UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS EXHIBITION OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN PAINTING

    GEORGE D. STODDARD President of the University

    DEAN REXFORD NEWCOMB (Chairman, Festival of Contemporary Arts

    OPERATING COMMITTEE "

    N. Britsky H. A. Schultz j

    C. V. Donovan A. S. Weller \

    W. F. Doolittle, Jr. J. D. Hogan, Chairman

    L. F. Bailey D. J. Newman ;

    C. E. Bradbury K. K. Post

    C. W. Briggs A. J. Pulos t

    J. Burke E. C. Rae i 1

    C A. Dieteniann J. W. Raushenberger 1 R. L. Drummond F. J. Roos

    R. E. Eckerstrom L. B. Segedin

    G. N. Foster J. R. Shipley

    J. R. Frintz M. A. Sprague

    R. E. Hult E. A. Turner

    J. W. Kennedy L. M. Woodroofe

    J. G. Lynch G. E. Wuellner

    M. B. Martin N. \'. Ziroli

    W. T. Moses

  • Acknowledonento The College of Fine and Applied Arts is grateful to those who

    have made loans of paintings to this exhibition and acknowl-

    edges the cooperation of the following museums and galleries:

    ACA GALLERY

    ASSOCL-MED AMERICAN ARTISIS. L\C.

    BABCOCK GALLERIES

    BIGNOU GALLERY, INC.

    THE CHINESE GALLERY, LTD.

    BORIS DEUTSCH ART GALLERY

    THE DOWNTOWN GALLERY DIRLACHER BROIHERS

    FEIGL GALLERY

    FINDLAY GALLERIES

    GALLERY STUDIO

    GRAND CENTRAL ART GALLERIES. INC.

    KLEEMANN GALLERIES

    M. KNOEDLER & COMPANY. INC.

    SAMUEL M. KOOIZ G.\LLERY

    KRAUSHAAR GALLERIES

    MORTIMER LEVriT GALLERY

    JULIEN LEVY GALLERY

    JOSEPH LUYBER GALLERIES, INC.

    MACBETH GALLERY

    PIERRE MATISSE GALLERY

    MIDTOWN GALLERIES

    THE MILCH GALLERIES

    ART MUSEUM OF THE NEW BRITAIN INSTITUTE

    NIVEAU GALLERY

    BETTY PARSONS GALLERY

    PASSEDOIT GALLERY

    PERLS GALLERIES, INC.

    FRANK K. M. REH.N, INC.

    A. P. ROSENBERG & COMPANY, INC.

    HARRY SALPETER GALLERY, INC.

    JACQUES SELIGMANN & COMPANY. INC.

    VAN DIEMENLILIENFELD GALLERIES

    WHITNEY MUSEU.M OF AMERK^^N ART

    WILLARD GALLERY

  • Jury

    ARIIIUR MIl.I.IKR

    ABRAHAM RATTNER

    MAURICE STERNE )

    «

    5

    I

    «

    Awards

    Purchase prizes totaling seven thousand

    five hundred dollars were awarded to the

    following artists:

    CLAUDE BENTLEY

    LOUIS BOSA

    FRED CONWAY

    JOHN HELIKER

    CARL HOI/I Y

    RICO LEBRUN

    ARTHUR OSVER

    FELIX RUVOLO

    YVES TANCiUY

    BRADLEY WALKER lOMLIN

  • Sales

    Paintings in this exhibition are for sale. Visitors

    are cordially invited to secure information from

    the attendant at desk in the West Gallery. The

    University of Illinois charges no commission on

    any sale.

  • Introduction

    Art is not a thing apart, a phenomenon divorced from life. Art, if it is any-

    thing, is an expression, a function of life, an index to and a telltale of life as

    it is lived on this planet. Contemporary life, for a number of reasons, is on

    the move. Rapidly are we arriving at new premises, changed viewpoints,

    and vantage grounds undreamed of a few short years ago. Many reared

    upon older patterns have seen a world of fixed categories dissohc into an

    evanescent flux that brings new problems and changed responsibilities at

    every turn.

    With life in rapid flux, it is not strange that art should exhibit fresh

    approaches, new directions and changed or uncommon forms. To many,

    therefore, much of what is seen in this Second Exhibition of Contemporary

    American Painting may appear weird, unearthly, even inhuman. But this

    should not disturb us unduly. Every art historian is well aware of the fact

    that, in times of rapid social change, art often gets out of touch with life.

    At such times individual artists may indeed turn the mirror inward and

  • temporarily become aloof. Much of what you see here exhibits an intro-

    specti\'e approach with occasional flash-backs to realities vaguely remem-

    bered or consciously a\oided.

    Down through the ages, the painter appears to have exhibited two

    general aims : ( 1 ) to hold a mirror up to life, and ( 2 ) to idealize life and

    its environmental backgrounds in the hope of making life richer and more

    acceptable to the participants thereof. In order to do this, however, life

    must have attained a certain expressible unity and have paused long enough

    to be recorded. Neither of these conditions, apparently, are currently attain-

    able. Meanwhile our painters are recording the cinema of American life.

    A part of that kaleidoscopic record is before you. But artists, for the most part, are today too close to reality to gloss over

    the seamy sides of a life largely preoccupied with war and want. Art is not

    likely to be joyous in an age when much of what we produce goes to pay

    for past wars and present defense against conflict. Artists would be decei\-

    ing themselves and us if, at such times, they prated flowery platitudes.

    The artists here represented are alive to conditions in America and the

    world and few of them ha\'e withdrawn to mountain heights or ivory

    towers. On the other hand there is e\er)'where present in this exhibit evi- dence that art is still looked at in the light of creative living, as a moving,

    if not always a joyous, experience, as an emotional fulfilment, a necessary

    rounding out of being, open to all and indeed as necessary and as satisfying

    as physical development or intellectual growth. Seen in this light, each

    painting becomes a valid social document.

    The Exhibit Committee regrets exceedingly that the nation-wide com-

    petition held a year ago could not be repeated because of heavy enrollments

    and limited facilities. Howe\er, in selecting this exhibit of some one hundred

    thirty-four canvasses by well-known painters, the Committee has striven to

    make it nationally representative. Likewise, the Jury of Awards, to whom

    goes our sincere appreciation for duties well performed, represent coast-to-

    coast judgments in art evaluation.

    REXFORD NEWCOMB College of Fine and Applied Arts

  • An Approach to Contemporaiy

    American Painting

    The aims of the present exhibition may be quite simply stated. We want to see at the University of Ilhnois as much and as many kinds of first-rate

    recent American painting as we can, not only because we are convinced

    of the educational, social, and aesthetic importance of an exhibition of such

    work, but because we are deeply concerned with building a significant

    permanent University collection, which is being added to by the prize

    winning paintings from this year's show. We believe that in assembling these paintings we have recognized outstanding work from many different sources,

    and we feel that the comparisons and contrasts which such an exhibition

    makes possible will help to clarify some of the tendencies which artists

    today are following. Every work of art is, in greater or lesser degree, in-

    fluenced by its surroundings, and it is quite possible that there will be

  • reactions and responses to this particular show which will bring into focus

    certain points of view which would otherwise escape us.

    This is the second comprehensive national exhibition which has been

    held at the University of Illinois. This year, as la.st, the collection has been

    assembled with the sole idea of artistic quality as the guiding factor in de-

    termining the inclusion of each individual work. It is essentially a painter's

    show. Though it will interest many people from the standpoint of subject

    matter, and is bound to be a meaningful commentary on certain social

    aspects of our period, the fact that it was chosen by a group of professional

    painters gives it a distinctive character. The people who have been respon-

    sible for selecting the paintings have not consciously followed any prede-