Concussion in Sport Policy - NSW Sport and Recreation Ms cAo bySsacASili Concussion in Sport Policy...

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Transcript of Concussion in Sport Policy - NSW Sport and Recreation Ms cAo bySsacASili Concussion in Sport Policy...

  • Concussion in Sport PolicyIssued by Sports Medicine Australia V1.0 January 2018

  • Acknowledgements

    Sports Medicine Australia (SMA) developed this policy with the

    support of the New South Wales Office of Sport. SMA would like

    to acknowledge the following people that assisted developing

    this resource:

    Dr Paul Bloomfield(Chief Medical Officer, National Rugby League)

    Dr Alex Donaldson(Senior Research Fellow, La Trobe University)

    Dr Andrew Gardner(Clinical Neuropsychologist, University of Newcastle)

    Dr David Hughes(Chief Medical Officer, Australian Institute of Sport)

    Dr Warren McDonald(Chief Medical Officer, Australian Rugby Union)

    Disclaimer

    The information in this policy is general. Reading or using this

    policy is not the same as getting medical advice from your

    doctor or health professional. All reasonable attempts have

    been made to ensure the information is accurate. However, SMA

    is not responsible for any loss, injury, claim or damage that may

    result from using or applying the information in this policy.

    The information in this policy should be considered and

    interpreted in the context of other risk management, insurance,

    governance and compliance frameworks and obligations

    relevant to sporting organisations. Familiarity with relevant

    International Sports Federation (ISF), National Sporting

    Organisation (NSO) and State Sporting Organisation (SSO)

    policies and requirements is essential to enable appropriate

    interpretation and application of the information in this policy.

    For more information about risk management and legal Issues

    in sport, see the following NSW Office of Sport website:

    Risk management:

    https://sport.nsw.gov.au/clubs/ryc/governance/risk

    Legal issues:

    https://sport.nsw.gov.au/clubs/ryc/legal

    Concussion in Sport Policy V1.0 Page 2

  • Concussion is a significant and complex health issue.

    This policy will enable all sporting codes to know how to

    recognise and manage concussion at all levels of play.

    This policy is an educational and practical resource for State

    Sporting Organisations. It will help them to create safe sporting

    environments by providing important information about how to

    recognise and manage concussion in their sport.

    All the information in this policy is in line with the latest findings

    from the 5th International Conference on Concussion in Sport, and

    the 2017 Concussion in Sport Group (CISG) consensus statement.

    The aim of this policy is to ensure that all players with a suspected

    concussion - in all sports and at all levels - receive timely and

    appropriate advice and care to enable them to safely return to

    everyday activities and sport.

    It will help players, coaches, officials and parents:

    understand what concussion is and why it is

    important, particularly for children

    recognise concussion

    manage a suspected concussion

    manage return to participation after concussion

    know where to get more information about concussion.

    Who Should Use this Policy

    All stakeholders involved in sport including players, parents,

    coaches, officials, teachers, first aid providers, sports trainers and

    administrators, should know about and meet the requirements of

    this policy.

    How to Use this Policy

    The policy addresses recognition and management of

    sport-related concussion:

    For each area, recommendations are provided, along with:

    Who - Who are the people that play a key role to implement the

    recommendation in this area.

    How - What are the key tools and documents people can use to

    implement the recommendations in this area. All relevant tools are

    included in this policy.

    Concussion in Sport Policy V1.0 Page 3

    Introduction

    The aim of this policy is to ensure that all players with a suspected concussion - in all sports and at all levels - receive timely and appropriate advice and care to safely return them to everyday activities and sport.

  • To keep players healthy and safe, clubs and everyone involved in sport

    - players, parents, coaches, officials, teachers, first aid providers, sports

    trainers and administrators - must take steps to reduce the risks and

    prevent an incident before it occurs.

    Key steps to do this are:

    1. Education

    One of the best ways to build a healthy and safe sporting environment

    is to educate all stakeholders. This can increase knowledge, change

    attitudes and improve culture.

    Despite the recent focus on concussion, we still need to improve

    concussion awareness and knowledge. State Sporting Organisations,

    regional associations and clubs should have an annual process to

    educate everyone involved in their sport about concussion. This should

    include the most up to date information about how to recognise and

    manage concussion.

    Concussion education should include information about:

    What concussion is;

    The causes of concussion;

    Common signs and symptoms;

    Steps to reduce the risk of concussion;

    What to do if an athlete has a suspected concussion or head injury;

    What should be done to ensure a proper medical assessment;

    Return to school or work, return to sport and medical

    clearance requirements.

    Potential education strategies may include provision of appropriate

    fact sheets to all stakeholders when they register with a club at the

    start of each season or when they register for an event. Clubs and

    event organisers should ensure that all stakeholders understand the

    concussion protocols for their sport at the beginning of each season.

    They should organise a pre-season face-to-face education session for

    players, parents, coaches and other stakeholders.

    Concussion in Sport Policy V1.0 Page 4

    Pre-Season Preparation and Reducing Risks

    One of the best ways to build a healthy and safe sporting environment is to educate all stakeholders.

    1. EducationEducate everyone about how to recognise and manage concussion

    2. InformationGather information about previous concussions

    3. DesignationAppoint someone to be responsible for ensuring this policy is implemented

  • Pre-Season Preparation and Reducing Risks

    Concussion in Sport Policy V1.0 Page 5

    Knowing about an athletes previous concussions can help to identify players who fit into a high-risk category

    Designate a Concussion Coordinator within a club or at an event who can ensure that the concussion protocol is communicated and followed.

    2. Information - about previous concussions

    Knowing about an athletes previous concussions can help to

    identify players who fit into a high-risk category. It also provides an

    opportunity to educate the athlete and their parents or family about

    the significance of concussion injuries. If anyone is concerned about

    an athletes concussion history, refer the athlete to a medical

    practitioner for a full review. As with any other personal athlete

    information collected by a club, this should be handled and treated

    with full confidentiality.

    Parents and players should be encouraged to report any history of

    previous concussions to coaches, officials, teachers, trainers and

    administrators.

    3. Designation: appoint a Concussion Coordinator

    While everyone has a role to play in recognising and managing

    concussion, having a person(s) - a Concussion Coordinator - within

    a club or at an event who can ensure that the concussion protocol

    is communicated and followed, is highly recommended. Ideally and

    when resources permit, a medical practitioner, first aid provider or

    sports trainer should be assigned this task. If resources are limited,

    consider assigning a coach, official, teacher or administrator to this

    role. Once a Concussion Coordinator has been identified:

    give them the authority to make decisions and be proactive;

    encourage them to keep their knowledge up to date; and

    tell everyone who they are via the club website/newsletters,

    and concussion-specific information (policy, fact sheet,

    posters etc).

  • Pre-Season Preparation and Reducing Risks

    Concussion in Sport Policy V1.0 Page 6

    Players, parents and Concussion Coordinators all have a role in recognising and managing concussion.

    The Roles of the Main Stakeholders

    The main stakeholders all have a role in recognising and managing concussion:

    Players should:

    report any potential concussion symptoms they experience;

    report if they suspect a team mate or fellow player has concussion;

    follow any medical advice they receive.

    Parents should:

    watch carefully for immediate and delayed signs and symptoms of concussion;

    obtain proper care for their child;

    inform other stakeholders of their childs health.

    Designated Concussion Coordinator should:

    ensure all stakeholders are aware of the concussion policy;

    coordinate all concussion education activities;

    organise and distribute concussion resources (posters, fact sheets etc, Concussion Recognition Tool 5);

    ensure all stakeholders follow game day and practice concussion protocols;

    notify parents of concussed junior players as quickly as possible and provide advice about further management of their child;

    ensure concussed players follow appropria