Co-ordinator - Maynooth University Web view National University of Ireland, Maynooth. DEPARTMENT OF

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Transcript of Co-ordinator - Maynooth University Web view National University of Ireland, Maynooth. DEPARTMENT OF

National University of Ireland, Maynooth

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

OPTIONAL MODULES

III ARTS SEMESTER 1 2016-17

PLEASE NOTE

Flyers provide information supplementary to that available in module descriptors, which may be viewed on the university database at www.maynoothuniversity.ie/courses.

Students are expected to consult both flyers and module descriptors in advance of registration.

national university of ireland, maynooth

department of history

third arts, 2016-17

First Semester

Co-ordinator

DR MARTIN OTT

Module code HY307

Credits

2.5

Lecture hours per week

N/A

Module title

READING MODULE 3A

Module content

This module requires students to read one or more assigned books/articles and to present an analytical report.

A list of approved titles will be provided on the relevant Moodle site early in the semester.

Upon successful completion of the module, students should be able to compose an analytical report based on assigned reading.

Form of assessment

2,500 word essay to be submitted by Wednesday, 4 January 2017

Special requirements (e.g., field trips inc. cost; special sessions; books)

None

national university of ireland, maynooth

department of history

third arts, 2016-17

First Semester

Lecturer

DR COLMÁN ETCHINGHAM

Module code SG 302

Credits

5

Lecture hours per week

Two

Module title:

LAW, SOCIETY AND THE LEARNED CLASSES IN EARLY CHRISTIAN IRELAND

Module content

This module introduces students to key aspects of the early Irish laws, popularly known as the ‘Brehon laws’, investigating what they can tell us about early Irish society, by studying directly passages from the laws themselves in translation.

Form of assessment

Two essays of up to 2000 words on primary sources studied in class. 100%

Deadlines for submission of essays are TBC

Special requirements (e.g. field trips inc. costs, special sessions)

None

*Note that, since this module is also taken by students of Celtic Studies, there is only a limited number of places available for students of History

Please note that SG302 is timetabled by the School of Irish and may clash with core

lectures in other subjects.

national university of ireland, maynooth

department of history

third arts, 2016-17

First Semester

Lecturer

DR DYMPNA MC LOUGHLIN

Module code HY 312

Credits

7.5

Lecture hours per week

Three

Module title

GENDER AND EMIGRATION IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY IRELAND

Objectives

· To understand the chronology of nineteenth century Ireland emigration

· To analyse orphan emigration schemes to Canada.

· introduce convict transportation and landlord clearance schemes as examples of involuntary assisted emigration

· examine the motivations behind the emigration of men and women throughout the nineteenth century, and to elaborate on the differences between them. Special focus will be on the overrepresentation of women in post famine emigration.

· to analyse the social, economic and cultural context of nineteenth century Ireland and how these factors impacted on emigration.

Aim

To analyse the phenomenon of emigration from the point of view of ordinary men and women.

Assessment:

Please Note

Assessment for this elective will be based on a handwritten nineteenth century primary source - a convict petition. These convict petitions are documents that either the convict (or his or her representative) wrote in the hope that they would not be transported to New South Wales. These petitions are only available in the National Archives of Ireland, Bishop Street, Dublin and students should expect to make at least two visits to find suitable petition(s). The petition has to be of sufficient length and complexity to write a 5,500 word essay. It is also acceptable to select two shorter petitions and compare and contrast them. Petition(s) have to be photocopied as they have to be included in your essay. The National Archives has a small charge for this.

Template (including primary sources and brief outline of essay) 2,000 words 20%

Essay of 5,500 words with the convict petition attached 80%

Essay deadline: Wednesday, 4 January 2017

Attendance requirements apply. See relevant descriptor at www.maynoothuniversity.ie/courses.

Special requirements (e.g., field trips inc. cost; special sessions; books):

See above re visits to National Archives

national university of ireland, maynooth

department of history

third arts, 2016-17

First Semester

Lecturer

DR ALISON FITZGERALD

Module code HY323

Credits

7.5

Lecture hours per week

Three

Module title:

THE BUSINESS OF LUXURY: THE DECORATIVE ARTS IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE

Module content:

What caused Augustus the Strong Elector of Saxony and King of Poland to be seized by porcelain ‘madness’? Why was there such a fascination with luxury goods from China and Japan in eighteenth-century Europe? Why are the names of eighteenth-century entrepreneurs like Josiah Wedgwood and Thomas Chippendale still so well known today? This seminar will examine the production, retailing and consumption of luxury goods including porcelain, silver and furniture in eighteenth-century Europe. Who were the arbiters of taste and fashion during this period? What was new? How did developments in terms of fashionable living generate demand for new categories of goods such as silver or ceramic tea wares? The supremacy of French taste during the first half of the eighteenth century will be investigated, by drawing comparisons with Georgian Britain, which imported French ideas in the sphere of design and the decorative arts, while at the same time expressing rivalry and even Francophobia. Britain’s own commercial expansion will be analysed to take account of the factors that encouraged innovation in design. The way in which luxury goods were manufactured, advertised and sold will be examined using both modern and eighteenth-century sources to develop a closer understanding of the objects. No previous knowledge of design history is required.

Assessment:

In-class assessment: 40%

Research project (approximately 4,000 words) based on primary sources on topic

approved by the lecturer: 60% Deadline: Wednesday, 4 January 2017

Attendance requirements apply. See relevant descriptor at www.maynoothuniversity.ie/courses.

Special requirements (e.g., field trips inc. cost; special sessions; books):

The number of students admitted to this module is limited to 25. There will be 2-3 site visits, which will usually take place on Friday afternoons and possibly 1 Saturday morning.  A modest admission fee may apply. The site visits will replace the usual seminar slots in relevant weeks.

national university of ireland, maynooth

department of history

third arts, 2016-17

First Semester

Co-ordinator

DR COLMÁN ETCHINGHAM

Module code HY332

Credits

2.5

Lecture hours per week

N/A

Module title

READINGS ON EARLY IRISH LAW AND SOCIETY

Students will chose one from a list of books on the subject of the module and write a critical review of the book chosen.

For the list of books please email colman.etchingham@nuim.ie.

Form of assessment

Book review (2500 words) 100%

Deadline: Wednesday, 4 January 2017

Special requirements (e.g., field trips inc. cost; special sessions; books)

national university of ireland, maynooth

department of history

third arts, 2016-17

First Semester

Lecturer

PROFESSOR FILIPE RIBEIRO DE MENESES

Module code HY 333

Credits

7.5

Lecture hours per week

Three

Module title

THE FIRST WORLD WAR AND FASCISM

Module content

The historiography of the First World War has shifted in the past years from purely diplomatic and military concerns to the incredibly rich political, economic, social, and cultural developments taking place behind the lines. The attempts by belligerent governments to harness their respective countries’ strength for war left indelible marks on Europe, which can only be understood if a broad comparative approach is adopted. These attempts were also to have a direct impact on the inter-war history of Europe: it is impossible to understand the sudden appearance of the Fascist phenomenon without reference to the war experience not only of soldiers, but of all men and women in the countries affected by the war. This course intends to trace the development of Fascism, demonstrating how its core ideology was shaped by the desire to recreate in peace the virtues of a mythical wartime society which had never in fact existed.

Topics

This course is divided into two broad parts. In the first, the war itself is examined: its causes and course, the experience of those who fought in it and, above all, the attempt by the belligerents to bring all their strength to bear on the enemy. This means that we will consider the role of all those groups which offered their services to wartime governments: churches, unions, feminist organisations, intellectuals, etc. The economic dimension of