Classroom Management in Higher Education

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  1. 1. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Dr. Charles M. Ware, D.H.Ed., CHES Classroom Management in Higher Education 1
  2. 2. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Learning Goals 1. Explain why classroom management is both challenging and necessary. 2. Describe the positive design of the classrooms physical environment. 3. Discuss how to create a positive classroom environment. 4. Identify some good approaches to communication for both learners and facilitators. 5. Formulate some effective approaches that facilitators can use to deal with problem behaviors.
  3. 3. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Managing the Classroom Why Classrooms Need to Be Managed Effectively Management Issues in Higher Education Classrooms Management Goals and Strategies The Crowded, Complex, and Potentially Chaotic Classroom Emphasizing Instruction and Positive Classroom Environment Getting Off to the Right Start
  4. 4. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Things happen quickly Classrooms have histories Events are often unpredictable Classrooms are multidimensional Activities occur simultaneously There is little privacy Classrooms Can Be Crowded, Complex, and Potentially Chaotic
  5. 5. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Getting Off to the Right Start Establish behavioral expectations and address learner uncertainties Ensure learners experience success Be available and visible Be in charge
  6. 6. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Management Goals and Strategies Help learners spend more time on learning and less time on non-goal-directed behavior Prevent learners from developing problems
  7. 7. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Managing the Classroom Designing the Physical Environment of the Classroom Principles of Classroom Arrangement Arrangement Style
  8. 8. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Basic Principles of Classroom Arrangement Reduce congestion in high-traffic areas Make sure that facilitators can easily see all learners Make often-used teaching materials and learner supplies easily accessible Make sure that learners can easily observe whole-class presentations
  9. 9. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Classroom Arrangement Styles Auditorium style Face-to-face style Off-set style Seminar style Cluster style
  10. 10. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. The Action Zone Action Zone Learners in these seats are more likely to interact with the teacher, ask questions, and initiate discussion.
  11. 11. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. An Example of an Effective Elementary School Classroom Arrangement
  12. 12. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. An Example of an Effective Secondary School Classroom Arrangement
  13. 13. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Managing the Classroom Getting Learners to Cooperate Creating a Positive Environment for Learning Creating, Teaching, and Maintaining Rules and Procedures General Strategies
  14. 14. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Effective classroom managers Show how they are with it Cope effectively with overlapping situations Maintain smoothness and continuity in lessons Encourage learners in a variety of challenging activities
  15. 15. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Facilitator Management Styles Authoritative: Encourages learners to be independent thinkers, but provides monitoring and verbal give-and- take Authoritarian: Restrictive and punitive with the focus mainly on keeping order rather than learning Permissive: Learners have autonomy but little support for learning skills or managing behavior
  16. 16. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Creating, Teaching, and Maintaining Rules and Procedures CLASS RULES SHOULD BE Reasonable and necessary Clear and comprehensible Consistent with instructional and learning goals Consistent with school rules
  17. 17. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Getting Learners to Cooperate COOPERATION Develop positive learner/facilitator relationships Reward appropriate behavior Share classroom responsibilities
  18. 18. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Managing the Classroom Listening Skills Being a Good Communicator Speaking Skills Nonverbal Communications
  19. 19. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Being a Good Communicator SPEAKING SKILLS Assertive people express their feelings, ask for what they want, and act in their own best interest. You messages are undesirable Aggressive messages are often hostile Manipulation makes others feel guilty Passive people dont express their feelings
  20. 20. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Being a Good Listener Active Listening Pay careful attention to the person who is talking Paraphrase Synthesize themes and patterns Give feedback in a competent manner
  21. 21. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Being a Great Communicator NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION FACIAL EXPRESSIONS TOUCH SILENCE SPACE
  22. 22. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Managing the Classroom Dealing with Aggression Dealing with Problem Behavior Management Strategies Classroom- and School-Based Programs
  23. 23. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Management Strategies Minor Interventions Use nonverbal cues Keep activity moving Provide needed instruction Move closer to students Redirect the behavior Be direct and assertive Give student a choice Moderate Interventions Withhold privileges or desired activities Isolate or remove students Impose a penalty or detention
  24. 24. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Fighting: Emphasize inappropriateness, perspective- taking, and cooperation. Bullying: Develop a school climate characterized by high standards, parent involvement, and effective discipline. Defiance: Diffuse privately and avoid power struggles. Dealing with Aggression
  25. 25. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Classroom- and School-Based Programs Improving Social Awareness-Social Problem Solving Project Social Competence Program for non-traditional learners Three Cs of School and Classroom Management Cooperative community Constructive conflict resolution Civic values Classroom Organization and Management Program Skills for Life LAST RESORT: Good Behavior Game
  26. 26. 2008 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. Reflection & Observation Reflection: What various strategies have you used to manage your classrooms? How have these strategies affected the learning environment? Observation: What various strategies do other facilitators use to manage their classrooms and students? How do the facilitators management strategies differ? Be specific.