Chapter 3c Designing Interfaces and Dialogues

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Chapter 3c Designing Interfaces and Dialogues. Learning Objectives. Explain the process of interface and dialogue design and the deliverables. Contrast and apply methods for interacting with a system. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Modern Systems Analysis and Design Ch12Learning Objectives
Explain the process of interface and dialogue design and the deliverables.
Contrast and apply methods for interacting with a system.
Describe guidelines for designing interface layout, data entry field structure, feedback, and system help.
Design human-computer dialogues and understand how dialogue diagramming can be used.
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A typical interface/dialogue design specification:
Similar to form design, but includes multiple forms and dialogue sequence specifications
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INTERFACE METHODS
Interface: the method by which a user interacts with the information system
Common interaction methods
Users enter explicit statements into a system to invoke operations
Example from MS DOS:
COPY C:PAPER.DOC A:PAPER.DOC
This copies a file from the C: drive to the A: drive
Includes keyboard shortcuts and function keys
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Menu Interaction
A list of system options is provided and specific command is invoked by user selection of a menu option
Two common menu types:
Pop-up: menu placed near current cursor position
Drop-down: access point to menu placed at top line of display, menu drops down when access point clicked
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Organization: consistent organizing principle
Highlighting: only for selected options or unavailable options
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Form Interaction
Allows users to fill in the blanks when working with a system
Measures of an effective design:
Self-explanatory title and field headings
Fields organized into logical groupings
Distinctive boundaries
Default values
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Icons:
Graphic symbols that look like the processing option they are meant to represent
Use little screen space
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Natural Language Interaction
Inputs to and outputs from system are in a conventional speaking language like English
Based on research in artificial intelligence
Current implementations are tedious and difficult to work with, not as viable as other interaction methods
Both keyboard and voice entry
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Left-to-right, top-to-bottom navigation
Flexibility and consistency:
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Entry
Never require data that are already online or that can be computed
Defaults
Units
Make clear the type of data units requested for entry
Replacement
Captioning
Format
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Common sources data entry errors in a field:
Appending: adding additional characters
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Feedback Messages
Status information: keep user informed of what’s going on, helpful when user has to wait for response
Prompting cues: tell user when input is needed, and how to provide the input
Warning or Error: inform user that something is wrong, either with data entry or system operation
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Guidelines:
Simplicity
Organize
Information in help messages should be easily absorbed by users
Show
It is useful to explicitly show users how to perform an operation
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DESIGNING DIALOGUES
Dialogue: A sequence of interactions between the system and a user
Dialogue design involves:
Dialogue diagramming: A formal method for designing and representing human-computer dialogues using box and line diagrams. See Figure 12-19 for example.
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Dialogue diagrams depict the sequence, conditional branching, and repetition of dialogues.
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In this chapter you learned how to:
Explain the process of interface and dialogue design and the deliverables.
Contrast and apply methods for interacting with a system.