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Chane de Valeur du recyclage des plastiques en France - Rapport final

Study to assess the impacts of different classification approaches for hazard property "H 14" on selected waste streams

Interim report

February 2015

Document information

BIO by Deloitte is a commercial brand of the legal entity BIO Intelligence Service. Since 26 June 2013 the legal entity BIO Intelligence Service is a 100% owned subsidiary of Socit Fiduciaire Internationale dAudit which is owned by Deloitte.

All the employees referred to in this proposal therefore remain available for the execution of the project, via the legal entity BIO Intelligence Service or Deloitte.

CLIENT

European Commission DG ENV

REPORT TITLE

Interim report

PROJECT NAME

Study to assess the impacts of different classification approaches for hazard property "H 14" on selected waste streams

DATE

16 February 2015

PROJECT TEAM

BIO by Deloitte (BIO), INERIS

AUTHORS

Ms Arianna De Toni (BIO)Ms Mariane Planchon (BIO)Ms Nada Sadi (BIO)Mr Pascal Pandard (INERIS)Mr Shailendra Mudgal (BIO)

KEY CONTACTS

Shailendra Mudgal+33(0)1 55 61 63 [email protected]

Or

Mariane Planchon+33 1 55 61 67 [email protected]

DISCLAIMER

The project team does not accept any liability for any direct or indirect damage resulting from the use of this report or its content. This report contains the results of research by the authors and is not to be perceived as the opinion of the European Commission.

Please cite this publication as:

BIO by Deloitte (2015). Study to assess the impacts of different classification approaches for hazard property "H 14" on selected waste streams Interim report prepared for the European Commission (DG ENV), in collaboration with INERIS.

4Study to assess the impacts of different classification approaches for hazard property "H 14" on selected waste streams Interim report

Table of contents

1.Introduction7

1.1.Background7

1.2.Objectives10

2.Project progress11

3.Methodology13

3.1.Collecting data on how a sample of Member States perform the assessment of HP 1413

3.1.1.Selection of countries and data collection by survey13

3.1.2.Data collection by desk study15

3.1.3.Reporting data in factsheets15

3.2.Selecting mirror pairs for the assessment17

3.2.1.Selection process17

3.2.2.Selection criteria18

3.2.2.1.SC1: Preference of experts18

3.2.2.2.SC2: Availability and quality of data18

3.2.2.3.SC3: Tonnage of waste production20

3.2.2.4.SC4: Economic importance22

3.2.2.5.SC5: Potential presence of hazardous substances22

3.2.2.6.SC6: Criticality of waste classification23

3.2.3.Global score and selection of mirror pairs23

3.3.Collecting experimental data on selected waste codes24

4.Results: strategies of selected Member States to assess HP 1426

4.1.Member States survey26

4.2.Full country factsheets27

4.3.Description of the approaches27

4.3.1.General information27

4.3.2.Approaches using chemical analysis30

4.3.3.Approaches based on biotests33

4.3.4.Combined approaches36

4.4.Costs associated with implementing HP14 approaches38

4.5.Advantages and limits of the approaches38

4.5.1.Approaches based on chemical analysis38

4.5.2.Approaches based on biotests39

4.5.3.Combined approaches39

5.Results: selection of waste codes for the assessment42

5.1.Scores obtained for the selection criteria42

5.1.1.SC1: Preference of experts42

5.1.2.SC2: Availability and quality of data42

5.1.3.SC3: Quantity of produced waste43

5.1.4.SC4: Economic importance45

5.1.5.SC5: Potential presence of hazardous substances45

5.1.6.SC6: Criticality of waste classification48

5.2.Selected waste codes48

6.Next steps50

6.1.Reporting experimental data for the calculations50

6.2.Application of the four calculation methods51

6.2.1.Calculating average concentrations51

6.2.2.Running HP14 assessment methods and considering the final waste classification51

6.3.Comparative assessment of the different methodologies52

6.4.Consultation of the stakeholders and organising a stakeholders' workshop53

7.Annexes54

Annex 1.First Questionnaire sent to Competent Authorities55

Annex 2.Factsheets59

Annex 3.Second questionnaire sent to Competent Authorities103

List of Tables

Table 1: Waste production of the EU-28 Member States in 2012, extracted from Eurostat (Generation of waste [env_wasgen], WASTE: Total Waste, HAZARD: Total, Last update: 26/11/2014, Extracted on: 14/01/2015)13

Table 2: Example of publications in the waste classification topic of selected Member States (non-exhaustive)14

Table 3: Template for the country factsheets16

Table 4: Attribution of weights according to biases in data on quantity21

Table 5: Score per Member State and weighted average score for SC3 - waste code 06 03 1622

Table 6: Experts contacted and their contribution (in grey: Member States who did not contribute)26

Table 7: National legislation or guidelines for the H14 assessment methods and protocols27

Table 8: Generic concentration limits for individual ecotoxic substances, according to their classification31

Table 9: Concentration thresholds for ecotoxic substances, according to their classification31

Table 10: Conditions rendering the waste hazardous by HP 14 during Step 4, per Member State adapting the DPD for HP 14 assessment32

Table 11: Standards for preparing waste samples33

Table 12: Batteries of tests used in Member States using biotests to assess HP 1434

Table 13: Tests on Daphnia magna, as used in Member States relying on biotests for the assessment of HP 1436

Table 14: Comparison between Italy and Germany regarding conditions rendering the waste hazardous by HP 14 during Step 4 of the chemical analyses method37

Table 15: Batteries of tests used in Germany and Italy37

Table 16: Most produced waste types in the studied Member States43

Table 17: Preliminary selected mirror pairs48

Table 13: Experts contacted and their contribution (in green: Member States who have already contributed, as of February 16th)50

Table 14: Example of table gathering the results of hazard classification for HP 14 for all the waste streams and all the calculation methods52

List of Figures

Figure 1: Workplan12

Figure 2: Waste quantities in Germany and attribution of scores20

Figure 3: Approaches for the assessment of HP 14 in the nine studied Member States29

Figure 4: Decision tree for the assessment of HP 14 using chemical analyses (based on the DPD)30

Figure 5: Ranges of costs in Member States for which the information is available38

Figure 6: Extract from the Excel sheet which reports results for SC142

Figure 7: Extract from the Excel sheet which reports results for SC243

Figure 8: Extract from the Excel sheet which reports results for SC3 (the percentage of waste is indicated as compared to total waste produced in the Member State)44

Figure 9: Extract from the Excel sheet which reports results for SC445

Figure 10: Extract from the Excel sheet which reports EC50 and NOEC values of potentially ecotoxic substances46

Figure 11: EC50 and NOEC of some of the most hazardous pesticides authorised in the EU47

Figure 12: Extract from the Excel sheet which reports results for SC547

Figure 13: Extract from the Excel sheet which reports results for SC648

Figure 14: Calculation/assessment methods for the classification of waste52

IntroductionBackground

In the EU, classification of waste is based on two regulatory texts: Decision 2000/532/EC[footnoteRef:2] establishing the List of Waste (LoW) and Annex III to Directive 2008/98/EC[footnoteRef:3] on waste (Waste Framework Directive, or WFD), which defines the properties that render waste hazardous. The LoW is meant to be a reference nomenclature providing a common terminology throughout the European Union, with the purpose to improve the efficiency of waste management activities. Assignment of waste codes has a major impact on the transport of waste, installation permits (which are usually granted for the processing of specific waste codes) or decisions about recyclability of the waste. The LoW thus serves as a common encoding of waste characteristics in a broad variety of purposes, including classification of hazardous wastes. [2: 2000/532/EC: Commission Decision of 3 May 2000 replacing Decision 94/3/EC establishing a list of wastes pursuant to Article 1(a) of Council Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Council Decision 94/904/EC establishing a list of hazardous waste pursuant to Article 1(4) of Council Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste (notified under document number C(2000) 1147), http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32000D0532&from=EN ] [3: Directive 2008/98/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 November 2008 on waste, http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32008L0098&from=EN ]

According to Article 2 of Decision 2000/532/EC, wastes classified as hazardous are those considered to display one or more of the 15 properties (H1 to H15) listed in Annex III to the WFD[footnoteRef:4]. Among them, H 14 describes the ecotoxicological potential or environmental hazards, as an intrinsic property of waste, by indicating whet