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  • Celliant Published Studies: Compilation of Clinical, Technical and Physical Trials

    Updated April 2020

  • Effect of Celliant® Materials on Pain and Strength in Subjects with Chronic Elbow and Wrist Pain

    The Test Report on the Impacts of Subject Socks with the Application of Celliant® Technical Fibers on Transcutaneous Oxygen Pressure on a Man’s Foot

    Double Blind, Placebo Controlled, Crossover Trial on the Effect of Optically Modified Polyethylene Terephthalate Fiber Mattress Covers on Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Chronic Back Pain

    Effect of Optically Modified Polyethylene Terephthalate Fiber Socks on Chronic Foot Pain

    Holofiber Study of Thirteen (13) Healthy Subjects

    Improving Blood Flow with Holofiber in the Hands and Feet of High-Risk Diabetics

    Long Beach VA Memorial Hospital

    Academy of Chinese Sciences

    University of CA Irvine

    University of CA Irvine

    University of Texas A&M

    Loyola University Chicago

    Dr. Li Shaojing, Wu Chuanhong, Gao Jian, Zhu Li and Wen Liwei

    Dr. Marcel Hungs and Dr. Annabel Wang

    Dr. Ian Gordon and Dr. Robyn York

    Dr. Graham McClue

    Dr. Lawrence Lavery

    100

    6

    55

    13

    20

    Apparel with Far Infrared Radiation for Decreasing an Athlete’s Oxygen Consumption During Submaximal Exercise

    Transcutaneous Partial Pressure of Oxygen (tcPO2) as a Primary Endpoint to Assess the Efficacy of Celliant® as a Vasoactive Material

    University of Calgary

    Long Beach VA Memorial Hospital

    Dr. Jay Worobets, Dr. Darren Stefanyshyn and Emma Skolnik

    Dr. Ian Gordon and Dr. Michael Coyle

    12

    51

    SUMMARY OF TECHNICAL & PHYSICAL TRIALS

    Year

    Year

    2019

    2017

    2014

    2016

    2012

    2012

    2012

    2010

    2009

    2005

    2003

    End Point

    End Point

    Grip Strength

    Solar IR Emissivity

    Tissue Oxygen (TCPO2)

    IR Emissivity

    Elbow and Wrist Pain

    Principals of IR

    Tissue Oxygen (TCPO2)

    Sleep (pilot)

    Foot Pain

    Tissue Oxygen (TCPO2)

    Tissue Oxygen (TCPO2)

    Title

    Title

    Effect of Shirts with 42% Celliant® Fiber on tcPO2 Levels and Grip Strength in Healthy Subjects: A Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    © Celliant 2020

    Infrared Radiative Properties and Thermal Modeling of Ceramic-Embedded Textile Fabrics

    Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Effects of Far-Infrared Emitting Ceramic Fabric Shirts and Control Polyester Shirts on Transcutaneous PO2

    Engineered Emissivity of Textile Fabrics by the Inclusion of Ceramic Particles

    Far Infrared Radiation (FIR): Its Biological Effects and Medical Applications

    Institution

    Institution

    Long Beach VA Memorial Hospital

    Exponent

    Long Beach VA Memorial Hospital

    Exponent

    Harvard/Wellman Center for Photomedicine

    Primary Investigators

    Primary Investigators

    Dr. Ian Gordon, Dr. Mark Vangel and Dr. Michael R Hamblin

    Dr. David Anderson, John Fessler, Matthew Pooley, Scott Seidel, Dr. Michael R Hamblin, Haskell Beckham and Dr. James F Brennan

    Dr. Ian Gordon, James Wason, Dr. Lawrence Lavery, Dr. Michael R Hamblin and MS Thein

    Dr. David M. Anderson, Matthew Pooley, Haskell W. Beckham and Dr. James F Brennan

    Dr. Ian Gordon and Dr. Michael R Hamblin

    Dr. Michael R Hamblin and Dr. Fatma Vatansever

    N

    24

    153

    70

    Journal /Publication

    Journal /Publication

    Journal of Textile Science and Engineering

    Biomedical Optics Express

    Journal of Textile Science and Engineering

    Optics Express

    N/A

    Photonics and Lasers in Medicine

    N/A

    N/A

    BioMed Central Complementary & Alternative Medicine

    N/A

    N/A

    Outcome

    Outcome

    Improved grip strength of over 12% in the dominant hand after 90 minutes

    Emissivity increased by approximately 10x when sunlight is also used to power Celliant technology

    Average increase in TCPO2 of 8.4% after 90 minutes for 71% of the subjects

    Emissivity increased by .14 MW per CM2 at fabric temperature of 32 Celsius with a 42% Celliant fabric vs. control

    Improved grip strength

    Far Infrared Radiation (FIR) its biological effects and medical applications

    Increase in TCPO2 across all healthy subjects

    Nighttime awakenings, sleep quality and sleep efficiency improved

    2011

    2012

    Performance & Recovery

    Tissue Oxygen (TCPO2)

    Research Journal of Textile and Apparel

    N/A

    Elite/club cyclists VO2 reduced by 1.1%, increasing anaerobic threshold

    An average increase of 7% in TCPO2

    Statistically significant reduction of pain and improved comfort for subjects (diabetic/foot neuropathy)

    An average increase in TCPO2 levels from 10% to 24%

    An average increase in TCPO2 levels from 12% in the hands and 8% in the feet of diabetic subjects

    SUMMARY OF CLINICAL TRIALS

  • Effect of Shirts with 42% Celliant® Fiber on tcPO2 Levels and Grip Strength in Healthy Subjects: A Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial

    Dr. Ian Gordon, Dr. Mark Vangel and Dr. Michael R Hamblin

  • Volume 9 • Issue 4 • 1000403J Textile Sci Eng, an open access journal ISSN: 2165-8064

    Research Article Open Access

    Gordon et al., J Textile Sci Eng 2019, 9:4

    Research Article Open Access

    Journal of Textile Science & Engineering Jo

    ur na

    l o f T

    ex tile

    Science & Engineering

    ISSN: 2165-8064

    Abstract

    Garments woven with Celliant™ yarns can be activated by body heat (conduction, convection and radiation) and

    2) measured over two sites (biceps and abdomen) was

    Effect of Shirts with 42% Celliant Fiber on tcPO2 Levels and Grip Strength in Healthy Subjects: A Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial Ian L Gordon1, Seth Casden2, Mark Vangel3 and Michael R Hamblin4,5* 1

    2

    *Corresponding author: Michael R Hamblin, Department of Dermatology, Harvard

    [email protected]

    Received Accepted Published

    Citation: 2

    Copyright: Gordon IL, et al the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and

    Keywords: Far-infrared emitting fabric; Transcutaneous oxygen; Grip strength; Blood pressure; Clinical trial

    Introduction Far infrared emitting fabrics and garments are becoming

    increasingly popular both for general health and wellness, and for the treatment of various medical conditions. Far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy has long been used for the treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions [1-3], including pain [4-6], wound healing [7], recovery from exercise [8], heart failure [9], and disturbed sleep [10]. !e FIR is o"en delivered by an electrically-powered device such as an infrared heat lamp, an infrared sauna, or a tourmaline and/or jade heating pad.

    However, an alternative way to deliver FIR to the body employs clothing, bandages, or patches constructed from #bers embedded with ceramic particles that emit FIR when powered by the body heat of the wearer [3]. !ese fabrics consist of a variety of di$erent mineral particles incorporated into the polymer #bers, which are then woven into garments or patches. !e mechanism of action involves natural heat from the body (radiation, conduction and radiation) being absorbed by the fabric, which then re-emits the energy back into the body in the form of FIR as a broad peak with a wavelength centered about 10 µm according to the Stefan-Boltzmann law.

    !e e$ective power density emitted by these fabrics is low (10 mW/cm2). Nevertheless, garments, bed sheets, bandages, and patches can be worn for much longer times, many hours or even continuously, allowing a physiologically relevant amount of FIR to be delivered to the body. At a molecular level the mechanism is thought to involve the absorption of the FIR by “nanostructured water” which forms at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces at cellular membranes including the mitochondrial membrane. !e stimulation of mitochondria along with the release of nitric oxide, can increase cutaneous blood %ow, tissue oxygenation, and produce bene#cial e$ects such as reducing pain, in%ammation, and stimulating wound healing and muscle recovery.

    We previously showed [11] that the wearing of a Celliant shirt for 90 minutes could signi#cantly increase the mean tcPO2 by 6.7% compared to a placebo shirt (p

  • Citation: Gordon IL, Casden S, Vangel M, Hamblin MR (2019) Effect of Shirts with 42% Celliant Fiber on tcPO2 Levels and Grip Strength in Healthy Subjects: A Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial. J Textile Sci Eng 9: 403.

    Page 2 of 5

    Volume 9 • Issue 4 • 1000403J Textile Sci Eng, an open access journal ISSN: 2165-8064

    Measurements of tcPO2 were taken every two minutes during the 90-minute placebo and 90-minute active study periods. Blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature were recorded before and a"er each period. !e entire study involved an acclimatization period (5 minutes) with vital sign measurement, placebo probe equilibration (10 minutes), placebo shirt period (90 minutes), break (15 minutes), active probe equilibration (10 mi