California Climber Magazine Summer 2013

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  • 8/13/2019 California Climber Magazine Summer 2013

    1/31California Climber

    free

    summer2013

    N 0530 /LIZARDS MOUT40 /LITTLE EGYPT52 /SUGAR PINE

    DESTINATIONS

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    California Climber

    ON THE COVER

    Catrina Behling onEspresso Crack (5.11c),Little Egypt, Bishop.IMAGE + DEAN FLEMING

    THIS PAGE

    Eric Sanchez on Bad Larry (V6/7), Christmas Valley,Meyers.IMAGE + ALTON RICHARDSON

    26/ MOON SHADOWS30 / LIZARDS MOUTH40 / LITTLE EGYPT52 / SUGAR PINE

    NO. 05SUMMER 2013

    DEPARTMENTS08 / EDITORS NOTE10/ ROUTE OF THE SEASON12/ CALIFORNIA CLIMBER14/ REVIEW18/ GOLDEN STATE GALLERY

    FEATURES

    CALIFORNIACLIMBERMAGAZINE.COM

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    CALIFORNIACLIMBER8 || SUMM| SPRING|ntain tools . carmel . california . since 1980

    PASS THE STICKERS, PLEASE

    C H E C

    K H A

    R N E S

    S &

    T I E -

    I N K N O

    T K E E P B E L A Y O N T I L A L L A R E S A F E

    K N O T

    R O P

    E E N

    D S &

    B A C

    K U P

    R A P C O

    N F I R M B E L A Y B 4 L O W E R I N G

    M O U N T A I N T O O L S U S A

    C L I M B

    JOIN OUR CAMPAIGN TO ELIMINATE COMMON ACCIDENTS & INJURIES

    Gonzo Chris Gonzalez comtemplates the remaining free moves to Sickle Ledge, LARRY ARTHUR

    Stickers Free w/Order or SASE

    l l d o e s i t a l l5.10-2-5.14

    CALIFORNIA CLIMBER22502 Colorado River DriveSonora, CA 93570Phone: (209) 768-0110Email: [email protected]

    MOST,IF NOTALL,OFTHEACTIVITIESDEPICTEDHEREINCARRYAND

    PRESENTSIGNIFICANTRISKSOFPERSONALINJURYOR DEATH.Rock climbing, bouldering, ice climbing, mountaineering, alpineclimbing and any other outdoor activity are inherently danger-ous. The owners, staff and management of California Climber do not recommend that anyone participate in these activitiesunless they are an expert or accompanied by an expert. Pleaseseek qualied professional instruction and/or guidance. Under-standing the risks involved is necessary; be prepared to assumeall responsibility associated with those risks.

    Neil Mahar on Welcome to the Dark Side (5.10c), Little Egypt, Bishop.

    CALIFORNIACLIMBERMAGAZINE.COM

    California ClimberPUBLISHER/EDITOR IN CHIEFDean FlemingART DIRECTORAlton RichardsonSENIOR CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERSJerry Dodrill, Jim ThornburgSENIOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORSFitz Cahall, James LucasCONTRIBUTORSJim Thornburg, Greg Epperson, Dave Hatchett, GrantOrdelheide, Christian Adam, Anthony Lapomardo,Michael Eadington, Marta Czajkowska, Charlie Barrett,Melissa Tomes, Gustavo Moser, Kelly Heslin, Alton Rich-ardson, Melissa Tomes, Dean Fleming

    D E A N F L E M I N G

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    This summer issue marks theone-year anniversary of CaliforniaClimber. The goal of this magazine hasbeenand always will beto celebratethe beauty of Californias spectacularclimbing areas. We want to publish pho-tos that kids will hang on their bedroomwalls. We want to tell stories that willinspire people to get outside and enjoythis state. But above all, when the nextgeneration heads to the crags, we wantthem to experience these areas as theywere meant to be: clean and natural.

    In practice, respect is simple.Most people would agree that littering,chipping and cutting down trees are badthings. But awareness of these impacts,options for preventing them and solu-tions for restoring the damage shouldbe widespread. If you are the youngergeneration, take it upon yourself tolearn Leave No Trace ethics and properwilderness etiquette. If you are the oldergeneration, set an example by pickingup trash, staying on trails and utilizingrespectful rst-ascent tactics. Remem-ber, when you are in the presence ofyouth, you are the teacher.

    EDITORS NOTE

    ETIQUETTE IS REQUISITE

    DEAN FLEMING

    IN MOST CIVILIZATIONS , people feela certain level of detachment from the environ-ment. The human race has invented words likenature and wilderness to describe placesthat differ from our modern habitat. The city isnot the wilderness. A gas station is not natural.Unfortunately, most people will never ventureinto the world that is truly natural, and eventhe most dedicated climbers speed past vaststretches of forests and deserts in air-condi-tioned cars on the way to the crag. We are allCalifornians by birth or by choice, but we are stillonly visitors to the cliffs, canyons and boul-derelds that make this state a rock climberssanctuary.

    Over the last 10 years, the standardintroduction to rock climbing has changeddramatically. Gyms and easy access to climbingmedia have increased training options and builta wealth of psych for the sport, but these re-sources cannot replace a thoughtful and diligentoutdoor mentorship. Whether youre transferringfrom the gym to climbing o utside or youre anold, crusty Trad Dad with 30 years and just asmany El Cap routes under your belt, stewardshipfor Californias climbing areas is vital to protectaccess and ensure the lasting beauty of WestCoast crags.

    J I MT H

    O R N B

    U R

    G

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    CALIFORNIACLIMBER12 || SUMM|

    ROUTE OF THE SEASON WORDS & IMAGE + CHARLIE BARRETT

    CRACK KINGDOM is a 5.10 crackclimbers dream, with perfect tight-grainedHigh Sierra granite and outstanding views.Just a 15-minute hike from Highway 168outside Bishop, Cardinal Pinnacle is home tosome the Eastsides best roadside cragging.Routes like the West Face (5.10a), Prow (5.12b)and Cucumbers (5.10b) all have stellar cracksystems ranging from tips to offwidth. Most ofCrack Kingdom is north-facing, but the routesees some evening sun, making it the perfectclimb for the hottest summer days.

    ROUTE

    Crack KingdomGRADE LENGTH

    5.10c 4 pitches, 500ROCK TYPE

    GraniteSTYLE RACK

    Traditional protection Gear to 4 inches, mostly nger and hand sizesLOCATION APPROACH DESCENT

    Aspendale, CA 15-20 min, talus 4 rappels down Prow route, double 60mSEASON

    Summer, fallGUIDEBOOK

    Bishop Area Rock Climbs by Marty Lewis and Peter Croft

    BETA

    PITCH 1 (5.10A) This line shares the same start as the West Face and Prow routes. Start by climbing most of therst pitch of the West Face to a ledge near thetop of the pitch. From here, traverse left along alarge ledge passing a gnarly-looking offwidth anda bolted anchor. Make an anchor at the bottom ofthe next short crack on a small stance.

    PITCH 2 (5.10B) From the belay, head up a right-leaning crackthrough some blocks aiming for a wide crack justbelow an ominous-looking are. The next offwidthand are sections are the most awkward parts ofthe climb and the crux of this pitch. From the topof the are follow an easy, low-angle gulley to abelay stance at the base of a left-facing corner.

    PITCH 3 (5.10C) This is the crux and the best pitch of the route.

    Head up a beautiful corner to a nger crack thattrends right and out of the dihedral. Pass a trickysection to get over a lip and then follow a crackthat heads up to the right. This will bring you toa nice little hand crack and nally to a big ledge;belay here near a thin right-facing ake.

    PITCH 4 (5.10B) Climb a thin ake and some 4th-class ledges toreach a large ledge below the actual summit. Todescend, nd the rap anchor that is placed on topof a giant block on the west side of the summit,which will take you down climbers right of theroute.

    CRACK KINGDOM (5.10c)

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    CALIFORNIACLIMBER14 || SUMM|

    BETH RODDEN

    IT WAS PRETTY GOOD. Actually, it was really good; it just takes a lot longer than youwant. Youre like, okay, an hour and fteen minutes laterstill cooking. Sitting in El Cap Meadowearlier this year, Beth Rodden excitedly recalled the chicken she roasted the night before in herYosemite West home. I cook pretty simple things but use really good ing redients. Between herBerkeley home with husband Randy Puro and her home in Yosemite, Rodden stockpiles nuts,vegetables and other fresh produce from the farmers market and her CSA (Community SupportedAgriculture) box. I like really good food, she says. I like really good rock climbing, too.

    From big walls and foreign expeditions to technical cracks, competition climbing andbouldering, Rodden is well-known for a long list of hard ascents. In June 2009 at the height of herclimbing career, she experienced one of the most signicant changes in her life. While boulderingin Yosemite, she tore the labrum in her right shoulder. Following rehab from additional shoulderinjuries, she damaged her ngers, tearing the collateral ligaments and exor tendons.

    I think for any athleteor anyone who likes to be activeinjuries are frustrating, saysRodden. But to have continual injuries for several years has been really devastating. The injuriesforced her away from a singular focus on climbing and toward a more well-rounded lifestyle. Shebegan prioritizing local, sustainable food, due in part to dietary restrictions and a rural Californiaupbringing. She adopted a frightened Rhodesian R idgeback named Max and started to concen-trate on rehabbing her body a