Broadsights (March 2014)

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It is with great pleasure to present March's edition of Broadsight. The corporate monthly magazine from The Broadgate Financial Group. To view full interactive of Broadsight March 2014, go to http://joom.ag/Z4oX

Transcript of Broadsights (March 2014)

  • 1. March 2014 Issue no. 10 SUSTAINABLE

2. G eneric Insight Individual Social Responsibility Sustainability C O N T E N T BANGKOK SHUTDOWN : IN BUSINESS PERSPECTIVE7-10 The National Economic and Social Development Board (NESDB) and The University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce (UTCC) are two institutions that have released reports where the economical outlook has signicantly been adjusted for the impact of the political turmoil. GREEN LUNGS OF BANGKOK: THE BANGKOK TREE HOUSE Bang Krachao is maybe the last area in Bangkok with wild nature, animals and clean air. GREEN GADGET: HOW TO CHARGE YOUR PHONE WHENEVER YOU ARE 14 With warm and sunny weather across Southeast Asia, its time to explore some wild excursions! 15 >> p. 5-6 >> p. 17-19 >> p. 15 INDIVIDUAL SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY : MUAY THAI 11-13 Muay Thai has a very long tradition in Thailand and has its roots many centuries ago. PLASTIC BAG: WHO CARES? Many initiatives have been enterprised in recent months in Thailand, and even if the current political situation in the country tends to make it a smaller problem 17-19 NEWS REPORT: ASEAN NEWS4 BROADGATE: WHY SOUTHEAST ASIA 5-6 Develoment News in ASEAN ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations), created in 1967, has developed successful trade partnerships among Southeast Asian countries 3. E D I T O R I A L March 2014 - Issue no. 10 Copyright 2014 Broadsight - A Broadgate Initiative 3 Ken Jayaphorn Dear Readers, It is a great pleasure to be part of this issue of Broadsight especially with the new exciting interactive design that makes reading much more enjoyable. Since the start of 2014, there had been many challenges for Broadgate primarily with political instability and we have made some exciting changes concerning the focus of our projects for the rest of the year. These changes will be ofcially announced in the next months foreword. In this March issue of Broadsight we continue to bring insightful and innovative stories regarding sustainability. One of the articles in this issue I nd exceptionally interesting is about plastic bags reduction initiatives executed by Tesco Lotus, and Seven-Eleven. The overconsumption of plastic bag issue is long over due in Thailand and it is nice that big companies like these are doing something about it. However, it is disappointing to still see that when I go to Seven- Eleven they are still giving me plastic bags without asking if I wanted one. The key to sustainability is the change in peoples habit from overconsumption to optimal consumption. We can see that more and more companies are becoming greener, which I am not sure about their incentives. Is it purely for brand image purposes? It seems that many are too focused on publicizing their initiatives to their customers but not so much have changed from their own employees. How can a company convince the society if they do not change themselves? I believe that an initiative can only do so much if not executed properly. Nonetheless, there is always hope as I can see people are becoming more and more aware of the issue we have with sustainability. We can see initiatives being done, new and more efcient technologies being created and even our Broadsight readership is increasing exponentially. Before I leave you today to enjoy your Next Level Reading, here is a quote by Eric Lowitt that I nd inspiring, Inaction is no longer acceptable. E d i t o r i a l Vincent Houzet vincent@broadgatenancial.com Christoffer Axelsson christoffer@broadgatenancial.com Muhammad Farhan Azama muhammad@broadgatenancial.com |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| Baptiste Laborde-Balen baptiste@broadgatenancial.com |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| Valentin Fischer valentin@broadgatenancial.com Prompairoj Ken Jayaphorn Prompairoj Ken Jayaphorn Vice President Business Development 4. E D I T O R I A L March 2014 - Issue no. 10 Broadgate - A Broadgate Initiative 4 LAOS - Villagers living near the site of the planned Don Sahong dam on the Mekong River in southern Laos have been barred from shing Source MALAYSIA - Are you going to dump your old milk jug into the trash can again? Source VIETNAM - More than 35 years after the end of the Vietnam War, Washington and Hanoi launched a joint project Thursday to clean up remnants of the toxic defoliant Source MYANMAR - Journalists say the Burma government is imposing new visa restrictions that will make it difcult for them to remain based in the country full time. Source 5. E D I T O R I A L March 2014 - Issue no. 10 Copyright 2014 Broadsight - A Broadgate Initiative 5 Every Asian country has a really rich culture, with deep history, outstanding cuisine and great people Fast-growing economy ! ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations), created in 1967, has developed successful trade partnerships among Southeast Asian countries thanks to their geographic proximity and cultural similarities. ! Countries like Indonesia, Philippines or Thailand have driven ASEAN's economic growth and it became one of the biggest consumer markets in the world, offering many opportunities for entrepreneurs. In addition to that, investor friendly government policies have drawn many foreign businesses to Southeast Asia. ! Considering ASEAN's free trade agreement, the abundance of natural resources and low-cost skilled labour, Southeast Asian countries are attractive in many different areas like technology, logistics, oil and gas, agri-food WHY SOUTHEAST ASIA 6. E D I T O R I A L March 2014 - Issue no. 10 Broadgate - A Broadgate Initiative 6 Largest cities in Southeast Asia like Jakarta, Bangkok or Singapore are very dynamic metropolises, where you will always nd something exiting to do. Everything is about conveniency: it's easy to nd an accommodation, there are many ways of transportation and you can eat at any time of the day/night. In most of these cities you will be able to enjoy at the same time modern skyscrapers with innovative architectures and old religious monuments. This parallel between modernity and tradition is also what makes Asian megacities so special and attractive. ! Every Southeast Asian country has a really rich culture, with deep history, outstanding cuisine and great people. Using cultural experience, uncommon language skills will be also a very efcient way to differentiate your resume for your future job applications. Aside from work experience, cross-cultural knowledge is also very important for professional life. ! The Southeast Asian low-cost everyday life is very interesting for young individuals and student. Even in biggest cities, you will be able to eat for less than 2$. Accommodation and transportation costs are also incomparable to the European/American ones. Baptiste Laborde-Balen 7. R O A D G A T E March 2014 - Issue no. 10 Copyright 2014 Broadsight - A Broadgate Initiative 7 Bangkok A Business Perspective Polticial unrest -The new normal forThailand In 2013 Bangkok was ranked as the top visited destination by international visitors, according to the Mastercard Global Destination Cities Index. Between the 13th of January and 3rd of March Bangkok was under siege by antigovernment protesters under the manifestation the Bangkok Shutdown. Altough the intentions of the protesters might have been purely political, the economical impact of such an action is unavoidable. Many domestic businesses experienced difculties. Economic losses from the"Bangkok shutdown" is estimated by UTCC to between 700 million Baht to 1 billion Baht a day SHUT DOWN 8. B R O A D G A T E The National Economic and Social Development Board (NESDB) and The University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce (UTCC) are two institutions that have released reports where the economical outlook has signicantly been adjusted regarded to the impact of the political turmoil Economic losses from the "Bangkok shutdown" is estimated by UTCC to be between Bt 700 million and Bt 1 billion a day where the tourism industry is predicted to be hit the hardest. Tourism revenues account for 10 percent of GDP, so any impact on the sector "should be signicant to economic growth," said Pimonwan Mahujchariyawong, an economist at Kasikorn Research Center. Economic losses from the "Bangkok shutdown" is estimated by UTCC to be between Bt 700 million and Bt 1 billion a day where the tourism industry is predicted to be hit the hardest. Tourism revenues account for 10 percent of GDP, so any impact on the sector "should be signicant to economic growth," said Pimonwan Mahujchariyawong, an economist at Kasikorn Research Center. Another important factor to economic growth that has been stalled due to the turmoil is government investment. After last election in 2011 the government ambitiously planned to implement several infrastructure projects by borrowing over 2 trillion baht. This large borrowing bill was never fully decided upon since it met political objections from opposing parties. To continue with the legal proceedings and the process towards a decision a fully functioning political system is required, something which now isnt expected until the second half of 2014. But while one mans joy is another mans sorrow some Thais entrepreneurial qualities were shown at the protester sites where these business owners showed quick adaptation to the circumstances. 9. R O A D G A T E 10. N E W S R E P O R T March 2014 - Issue no. 10 Copyright 2014 Broadsight - A Broadgate Initiative 10 These were losses estimated at the beginning of the turmoil, at the same time Thanavath Phonvichai at UTCC expressed his concern about the future and said that What is worrisome is that if the situation doesn't end soon. In order for Thailand to sustain potential growth over the long run public investment is a dire need, but before any decision abou