Basic Lighting for Film and Video III

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    Basic Lighting for Film and Video

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    Basic Lighting for Film And Video

    Framing the compositionRule of thirds

    Placing the subject off-center often makes the composition more dynamic and inter-esting. Even if your subject fills the frame, the most important part of the subject(for example, the eyes in a portrait) should not be dead center.

    Follow the rule of thirds (the Golden Mean). An easy way to compose off-center pic-tures is to imagine a tick-tack-toe board over your viewfinder. Avoid placing your sub-ject in that center square, and you have followed the rule of thirds. Try to place yoursubject along one of the imaginary lines that divides your frame.

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    Framing the compositionRule of thirds

    Watch the horizon. Just as an off-center subject is usually best, so is an off-centerand straighthorizon line. Avoid cutting your picture in half by placing the horizon inthe middle of the picture. To accent spaciousness, keep the horizon low in the pic-

    ture. To suggest closeness, position the horizon high in your picture.

    Composition is composed of: MASS (objects in the composition)

    Formal Balance (equal balance/classical balance) two objects of equal sizebecomes static.

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    Informal Balance (unequal balance) large object counterbalanced withsmaller object.

    LINE (implied line) vertical (strength)

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    horizontal (tranquility)

    diagonal (force and energy)

    curve (beauty)

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    S curve (line of beauty)

    leading edge (leads your eye somewhere in the picture)

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    Leading edge can also take you out of the picture.

    FORM (implied form) triangle/pyramid (solid base)

    radii (lines meet in the center)

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    cross (opposing force)

    rectangle L (framing)

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    VALUE (brightness and luminance) COLOR (hue)

    strong (advancing) warm (reds, yellows)

    weak (receding) cold (blues, greens)

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    contrast bright (strong and active)

    low (quiet and moody)

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    complimentary (opposites on color wheel) primary colors secondary colors

    Color wheel with primary, secondary and intermediate (or tertiary) colors.

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    Framing the compositionRule of thirdsGolden ratio

    If you were going to design a rectangular TV

    screen or swimming pool, would one shape bemore pleasing to the eye than others? Sincethe early Greeks, a ratio of length to width ofapproximately 1.618, has been considered themost visually appealing. This ratio, called thegolden ratio, not only appears in art and archi-tecture, but also in natural structures.

    1.61803398874989484820 (1.618)

    1:1.618 ratio (Golden Ratio) 6:9 ratio HD TV

    4:3 ratio (TV)

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    Framing the compositionRule of thirdsGolden ratio

    The sides of the Egyptian pyramids were golden triangles . Additionally, the three-four-five triangle is a golden ratio between the five unit side and the three unit side.

    The Egyptians considered this kind of right triangle extremely important and used italso in the pyramids. Golden triangle : An isosceles triangle with base angles of 72degrees and a vertex angle of 36 degrees.

    The Great Pyramid

    The Greeks put the Golden Ratio to work. Its use in architecture became widespread, and when Iktinos designed the Parthenon in the 5th century B.C., he used the

    Golden Ratio throughout it.

    The Parthenon

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    Framing the compositionRule of thirdsGolden ratio

    Natures use of the Golden Ratio

    Other names: The Golden Ratio. The Golden Mean. Phi. The Divine Section. TheGolden Section. The Golden Cut. The Golden Proportion. The Divine Proportion.

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    Leonardo DaVinci

    Mona Lisa

    The Annunciation

    This document is available in color pdf format at http://stocom.com/basic_lighting