ASK JT - The Choice School · 2021. 2. 18. · Madhubani, Kalighat, Bhils art, Gond, Cheriyal Art,...

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1 Who has been your greatest inspiration in life? JT: One can draw inspiration from people. Inspiration can also come from pioneering thoughts. But my inspiration has always come from within me. I do not look to other people and decide what I should do or how I should lead my life. If I am a dancer, I will watch numerous dance performances, but I will not want to dance exactly like those dancers on the stage. I will always want to craft a new style for myself, a new story that makes me unique. The story of my life has not been a very easy one. Before I knew the world too well, I had to go out in search of a career. I was just 17 when I first set foot on the Japanese soil. Honestly, I did not have anyone or anything to draw an inspiration from at that age and I learned that inspiration should come from within. Even today, I draw inspiration from myself. My subject related inspiration came from the Japanese. The Japanese are simple people who are too straight forward. My family tells me that I will not believe anything until I see or experience it myself. I am like that because I got it from the Japanese. One can draw inspiration from creativity too. Look at the beautiful flower called Rose. There are like a 1000 varieties of roses in the world now and a new variant is being created every day. That is absolute creativity and such ingenuity is something which you can always draw inspiration from. You can also draw inspiration from your need. Even today I draw my inspiration from my stake in this life. I mind my own business. I love myself and I surrender myself to God. I am His servant, and I ask God to use me the way he wants. Ultimately, my sole inspiration comes from God. Without His blessings, you cannot achieve anything in life. ASK JT Excerpts from the student interactive session with Mr Jose Thomas, President, The Choice Foundation. 7 TM
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Transcript of ASK JT - The Choice School · 2021. 2. 18. · Madhubani, Kalighat, Bhils art, Gond, Cheriyal Art,...

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    Who has been your greatest inspiration in life?JT: One can draw inspiration from people. Inspiration can also come from pioneering thoughts. But my inspiration has always come from within me. I do not look to other people and decide what I should do or how I should lead my life. If I am a dancer, I will watch numerous dance performances, but I will not want to dance exactly like those dancers on the stage. I will always want to craft a new style for myself, a new story that makes me unique. The story of my life has not been a very easy one. Before I knew the world too well, I had to go out in search of a career. I was just 17 when I first set foot on the Japanese soil. Honestly, I did not have anyone or anything to draw an inspiration from at that age and I learned that inspiration should come from within. Even today, I draw inspiration from myself.My subject related inspiration came from the Japanese. The Japanese are simple people who are too straight forward. My family tells me that I will not believe anything until

    I see or experience it myself. I am like that because I got it from the Japanese. One can draw inspiration from creativity too. Look at the beautiful flower called Rose. There are like a 1000 varieties of roses in the world now and a new variant is being created every day. That is absolute creativity and such ingenuity is something which you can always draw inspiration from. You can also draw inspiration from your need. Even today I draw my inspiration from my stake in this life. I mind my own business. I love myself and I surrender myself to God. I am His servant, and I ask God to use me the way he wants. Ultimately, my sole inspiration comes from God. Without His blessings, you cannot achieve anything in life.

    ASK JTExcerpts from the student interactive session with Mr Jose Thomas, President, The Choice Foundation.

    7Bringing you the power of education

    TM

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    Life comes at you in mysterious ways, but at the end of it all, what happens is for the very best. This is something that I have discovered through my journey that culminated in a profession that I never envisaged for myself – Teaching. My goals and dreams were focused towards building a career in Research and Development, but God had other plans for me that led me to this beautiful adventure called teaching.Shaping young minds and moulding children towards achieving their best is truly the most rewarding experience. Every day,

    every student is so refreshingly different. There is so much to learn from them, and there is never a dull day. With the myriad of activities, competitions and contests; the various happenings at The Choice School keep both students and teachers eager and

    engaged. No matter how old we grow, it is important to find the little joys in life. The best part about being a teacher is that we get to keep in touch with our inner child through our students and the experiences we share with them in academics as well as in co-curricular activities.I’ve been teaching at The Choice School for more than a quarter-century, and I have experienced how this institution has always encouraged its students and teachers to continually evolve with

    the changing times. Although circumstantial, it is through the same philosophy that the transition to digital learning is being implemented successfully.Education should not be only about acquiring a professional degree, but also, about building a career that resonates with your passion and interests. We at The Choice School believe in igniting this passion by giving you multiple avenues to explore your latent skills and equipping you to meet the challenges of the 21st century. You are the citizens of tomorrow. Be the change you wish to see around you. No dream is too difficult to be realised, and if you are dedicated and focussed towards your goals, then sky is the limit, and you have it in you to soar high.I would like to leave you with the following thought – Sunflowers turn towards the sun. In other words, they Chase the Light. But what happens on cloudy or rainy days? They turn towards each other to share their energy.When the days are dark, and the journey gets tough, do not be overwhelmed. Find your light in the darkness. Support and Empower each other. Spread Goodness, and it will come back to you. The world is a wonderful place and miracles happen every day. Never stop believing.Dream, Hope and Love for a beautiful life…

    MENTOR’S THOUGHTSCHASE THE LIGHT…. SPREAD THE GOODNESS…By Ms Lovely John, Department of Chemistry

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    “Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.” - Pablo PicassoThe History of Indian Art, is a topic that gives us an insight on both Visual and Performing arts. The basic Elements and Principles of Art help us identify and understand the three forms of art in architecture, sculpture and paintings. These are also known as the limbs of art (Shadangas). The line drawings on the stone surfaces revealing the day to day life depicted the basic shapes derived from nature. Architecture began with the study of stone structures which were later substituted with wooden structures. Art flourished during the Mauryan period (1- 6th Cent BCE) during the reign of King Asoka, who gave importance to art and brought out the skills of sculptors and architects by introducing more interesting structures like the Pillars and Stupas and by spreading Buddhism.Hindu temples also slowly began to grow bigger and larger in size. These sanctuaries was surrounded by pillared columns and shrines, and a sacred animal in front of the temple complex that one could easily identify as to which deity, the temple was dedicated to. This period also showcased the influence of Hellenistic features in the sculptural works.The Sculptural works in these temples are of two kinds, showing high relief and low relief. The skilled artists were quite successful in rendering the detailed panel work over the wall surfaces of the temples showing the different walks of life. Artists very skilfully sculpted on the walls, different lakshanas, rhythmic movements and mudras (hand gestures). The outer surface of the temples had stories from epics like Mahabaharat and Ramayan as well as from other literary documents.After the invasion of the Mughals, the style took a dramatic

    transition from a traditional one to a delicate style showing much more detailed and intricate work using geometric shapes and filling with brilliant colours. In the 13th to 18th century we get to see an absolutely a new style of paintings called Miniatures. Though they were very small in size, the details done were closely related to nature and day to day life events. Schools like Mewar, Bundi, Basohli, Kishangarh, Jodhpur trained artists to specialize in miniature paintings. Although it was Humayun who laid emphasis on art it was during the time of Akbar, that art reached its zenith. The literary works of India were translated to Persian and other languages so that artists from Persia, Iran and other Middle East countries could make illustrations pertaining to the poems and songs sung by Sufi saints which made the Mughal school of Miniatures, have a prominent place in Indian History of Art.The British colonialism is the period where Indian artists began to face a threat to their traditional style of painting. They unravelled the folk traditions which existed in a colourful and striking manner. A few of the styles that existed in various regions are the Madhubani, Kalighat, Bhils art, Gond, Cheriyal Art, Kalamakari, CalligraphyWork, Warli, Tanjore paintings and so on.Traditional Folk Art focused was concentrated in certain regions of the country, within specific communities. It was transferred and practiced within family groups over generations. These styles highlighted the life of each community in a very distinct manner. The combination of folk art with western style in an abstract form lead to the creation of modern style of art.Art history of India is an endless one and creates a platform for us to become aware of the culture that existed in our country which had a class of its own.

    DEPARTMENT SPOTLIGHT

    ART HISTORY OF INDIA – A JOURNEY THROUGH TIMEBy Ms Rashmi Rose John, Department of Fine Arts

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    Boul on kulo - art of WB

    Still life composition - oil pastels

    Stippling work

    Ganjifa card - Orissa

    Stippling work Pattachitra painting

    Madhubani work

    Stippling work

    Gond art

    Madhubani painting

    Saura Art

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    I have always been interested in drawing. It is my way of relieving pent up stress and composing myself. I do get tired of it but somehow I end up drawing again. Right now, drawing is something I cannot live without and I really enjoy it. It all started at that young age when your teacher finally teaches you to draw that sunset landscape. I remember how I drew that same drawing at least once a day just to show it to my parents. Over the years you could say my skills increased a bit and now I’m really into digital art. The fact that a mistake drawn on paper

    can sabotage the whole painting terrified me. When you don’t mix enough water and the paint becomes dry even before you can blend the colours or when you accidentally spill paint all over the painting are mistakes I make quite often. People say you can fix anything with art but you really can’t fix it if you end up drawing an oval when you intended to draw a circle. This is where the ‘undo’ option in digital art

    saves your life. I finally feel that I can draw what I had in mind rather than drawing from the mistakes I made. I get to make each stroke perfect. And all the different tools available in digital art help me go that extra mile while drawing. I mostly like drawing characters and people who inspire me. I find semi realistic paintings to be fascinating and I hope to create the same in future.How I am able to do all this? All thanks to the training I have received from my school. I would like to thank Ranjith Sir and Sunny Sir for the wonderful anatomy classes which has really helped me draw more and more every day. When you’ve got the greatest teachers at school why would you pay extra for training?

    CHILD SPOTLIGHTJANEETA JOLLY , X D

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    The White Tiger is the debut novel by Indian author Aravind Adiga. It was first published in 2008 and won the 40th Man Booker Prize in the same year. The novel provides a darkly humorous perspective of India’s class struggle in a globalized world as told through a retrospective narration from Balram Halwai, a village boy.

    Balram Halwai is a complicated man. Servant. Philosopher. Entrepreneur. Murderer. Over the course of seven nights, by the scattered light of a preposterous chandelier, Balram tells us the terrible and transfixing story of how he came to be a success in life—having nothing but his own wits to help him along.

    Reading through the first few pages, what immediately strikes the reader is the naked, abrupt anger with which an illiterate village man denounces the long glorified Indian systems of class, success and corruption. Balram Halwai, a self-made entrepreneur as he claims to be, describes how he, the son of a rickshaw puller, escaped from the life of the oppressive and oppressed poor or the “rooster coop” as the author cleverly puts it, to become a successful entrepreneur. His intriguing

    story is detailed in a series of 7 letters addressed to “His Excellency”, Mr. Wen Jiabao, a Chinese ambassador visiting India to learn its secret, the booming entrepreneurship and deceiving rates of success.

    Aravind Adiga in the process of exposing India as a country dominated by corruption and subjugation, reveals the harsh reality of the concealed murky mania that grips the Indian population to create his magnum opus. Through its straightforward criticism of India’s economic and political structure, this book has gone beyond the glimmers of saffron to overwhelm the reader with the grim actuality by comparing the minutest differences to show the huge gaps created by classism in the Indian society.

    The White Tiger is a social commentary on the gap between the wealthy and the poor in India. The poor are shown to be so distressed they are ready to do anything to make it out of the dark but yet are pulled down by none other than each other, back into the dreaded Rooster coop to watch each other waste away in submissive employment. At the same time the rich seem ignorant about such things and feel entitled to employ and expect perfect loyalty from anyone below them socially or economically. The author indicates how disparities by such huge measures can drive the sufferers to compromise on our widely accepted “morals”.

    Even though the novel is completely set in a permanent crazy darkness that seems to always loom over the storyline, by the end things are more on a positive note as Balram proudly declares a normal, though corrupted life and attains a long awaited confident position in our final destination, The Light.

    BOOK RECOMMENDATIONBOOK REVIEW THE WHITE TIGER BY ARAVIND ADIGABy Aashini Maria Akhil, XG

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    Besides the deadly pandemic that 2020 brought to us, the protests that took place in various states across India against the new agricultural bill was a big topic of conversation. They say never to bite the hand that feeds you but according to a large population of India, this is exactly what the current government achieved by passing this new bill in the parliament.

    In September, 2020, the Indian Parliament passed a bill which

    essentially acts to attract private investments. It also provides for contract farming, under which farmers will produce crops as per contracts with corporate investors for a mutually agreed remuneration. This essentially removes the middle man and creates a bridge between the farmers and the big corporations.

    According to the government, this bill was created in order to give the farmers more freedom and to not create any barriers between the buyer and seller. This will reduce the cost of transportation which helps the farmers get better prices. This also eliminates the use of government warehouses that store produce that go to waste on a daily basis.

    A main concern that many brought up was the fear of big corporations binding the farmers to unfavourable contracts that may put them in difficult positions. Along with that, many have

    a fear that they may not get the benefit of minimum wage or Minimum Support Price from the government, now that they are not involved. It also removes the benefit for these farmers to get any essential commodities which puts them in a difficult position.

    In places like Punjab and Kerala, the government has been clear in stating that they oppose this new bill and have gone out to the streets to fight. This backlash has definitely had an impact on the governing party, BJP as the agricultural sector is the largest sector in India. The question is, has the impact hit hard enough to shift people’s support from the right wing party?

    Sources say that the Congress Party (opposition party) has been hypocritical throughout this whole process as they have previously been in favour of this bill and have tried passing it, in the past but failed. This information also creates a lack of trust for many people with the congress party as well.

    To conclude, to know whether this bill along with the protests following, will make a huge difference in the support of the current government, will be upto the way the government deals with the backlash and the arguments that have been/will be raised.

    CHANGING WORLD SCENARIOS

    FARMER’S PROTESTS IN INDIAby Anoushka Thiruvillakat, XI E

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    CHOICE ALUMNUSGUARDIAN OF CHILDREN’S DREAMSMEKHA T

    As a social entrepreneur, I have always been disturbed by the stark differences in the standard of care and opportunities provided to children who have families and to those who do not. I made it my life’s work to reduce this glaring gap.

    Even though I was brought up as a typical Malayalee girl in Kochi, I was privileged to attend the best school in town and my parents always supported me in doing as many extracurricular activities as possible. My grandmother, who in a lot of ways is responsible for the woman I am today, always encouraged all her grand-daughters to grab every opportunity we could get and to never let anyone put us down because we were women.

    But when it came to choosing a career path, I was given only the two choices - either to become a doctor or an engineer. Choosing the latter, I found myself in an engineering college in Coimbatore, which was very difficult to adapt to since I was learning something I didn’t want to. But thankfully, being an adaptive person by nature, I was able to handle the four years with ease but more importantly I started volunteering in orphanages and teaching children English.

    When I went back to Kochi, I started working in an electronics manufacturing firm and I worked there for two years while still continuing to devote increasingly more time to volunteering with the cause, which I was beginning to realise, was my passion.

    By the time I quit my corporate job, I had already volunteered with orphanage homes for 3 years and I was quite deep into understanding the challenges of the sector. I was extremely restless with the knowledge that the lack of funding was one of the main reasons that the cause wasn’t doing any better. I had already started raising funds and conducting charity fundraising events and

    I thoroughly enjoyed being able to mobilize funding for the cause but just couldn’t get rid of the fact that I could do more. At the end of the day, the feeling that you can do something to help solve the problem is something that you can’t shake off and so I just jumped head first into the sector and I don’t regret a second of it.

    In 2015, I started Guardians of Dreams with the aim to upgrade and transform the quality of care provided by Children’s Homes across the country. Currently we work with 200+ homes and 2500 children across Bangalore, Kochi and Chennai. Our projects include renovating homes to improve safety hygiene and sanitations, providing scholarships to meritorious students of classes 10 and 12 to continue their education and providing after-school tuition support to children in classes 1-5.

    With my penchant for fundraising, along with its sustainable nature and the fact that childcare of underprivileged children is a highly underfunded sector, my work in Guardians encompasses multiple fundraising approaches - from institutional and corporate fundraising to the less conventional path of retail fundraising through volunteers. What excites me most in this role is experimenting with an earned-revenue based fundraising approach to increase funding potential for non-profits.

    If it takes a village to raise a child, 9 years in the child care sector has shown me that for children-in-need, each of us can play a part in that ‘village’ in some way or the other. And that is what will truly makes a difference to getting children off the street.

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    MINDSIGHTOVERCOMING EXAM STRESSBY MS HANNAH MASOOD, STUDENT COUNSELLOR

    SENIOR SCHOOL NEWSFOOD PRODUCTION IN HOTEL INDUSTRY

    CELEBRATING SCIENCE

    On 22nd January, 2021, the Home Science students of Grade XI had the privilege to interact with The Choice School alumni, Mr. Joe Paul Jiby on the topic “Food Production in Hotel Industry”. Mr Paul who is pursuing his Bachelor of Hotel Management degree in WGSHA, Manipal, explained in detail about kitchen organisation in hotels and the various methods of cooking food. The colourful presentation gave students an insight into the manifold qualities a person should possess to become a good chef.

    Celebrating the enigma called science, students of grade XI B & C joined Mr James Whitfield in a thought-provoking online session on biomolecules. With his captivating aura and his vast know how of the subject, Dr James kept the students spell bound throughout the session. The lecture which started with a simple introduction to chemical reactions and functions of proteins was made interesting with the numerous anecdotes and self-shot videos of experiments done by Dr James himself. In one of the videos, Dr James showed the denaturation of the milk proteins - casein and whey - an irreversible change. Students got to know that alterations in protein shape causes sickle cell anaemia. They were also provided with a detailed study on a very rare disease called Kuru, which is caused by an infectious protein. The session concluded with a discussion on enzymes and the factors which affect enzyme speed.

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    THE PLANT KINGDOM - PRANAV P, 9G

    BACK TO SCHOOL AFTER 300 DAYS – DOING THINGS DIFFERENTLY

    TRYING TO SET A RECORD

    Grade IX students had a session on The Plant kingdom by Mr James Whitfield on 29 January 2020. The session which started off with the ancestry of plants, detailed the history of biological classification, going back over 5,000 years to Sushruta who classified plants based on their flowering patterns. Dr Whitfield also elaborated a classification by the Greek philosopher Aristotle known as The Great chain of beings. He then discussed about Carl Linnaeus, who is considered the Father of Taxonomy, and a pivotal figure in Botany. He has identified over 25,000 species of animals and 10,000 species of plants, all of which were detailed in his scientific journals. Students also had the opportunity to delve into some important features in the Plant Kingdom. They learned that plants that survived the longest are the ones that protect all phases of reproduction and have effective means of seed dispersals. Dr Jim stressed on the importance of seed dispersal, which is integral in the process of germination. Students also explored the alterations of generations and the two different forms, sporophytes and gametophytes.

    Students of The Choice School were back on the campus after a long break of more than 300 days. They were at the school for the offline model exams for Grades X and XII, which was offered as an alternative to the online mode. Students of Grade XII was also here doing their laboratory practical sessions in batches. With the Covid19 protocol still in place, students were called in small groups to avoid any crowding.

    Students of psychology under the leadership of the faculty member, Ms Jeena Mary Jose, had the privilege to be a part of an attempt to set a record by the Tamil Nadu Association of Clinical Psychologists by holding webinars on mental health awareness simultaneously for one hour through online platforms. This is the first time that a mental

    health initiative is being attempted to reach the public at such a large scale. As part of the programme, 77 clinical psychologists from across India took sessions by holding a webinar on mental health awareness simultaneously for one hour through online platforms. The unique feat is set to be verified and certified by Elite World Records, Asian Records Academy and Indian Record Academy.

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    STUDENT CREATIVESDESI REPRESENTATION ONLINEBY SOHA AFTAB, XI F

    Often, adolescents look to media; including TV shows, movies and music; to figure out who they are and what they want to aspire to grow up to be. They look to the characters and the personalities that they see on the screens to try and figure out things about themselves—their likes, their dislikes, what they’re passionate about, what they want to do in the future, etc.

    It’s no surprise that we, as Indian teenagers, have not received much healthy representation in media. We’re often portrayed as one thing and often in the packaging of harmful stereotypes and only as side characters, existing only to be the punchline to the main character’s joke; who alarmingly always reassemble the archetypal white men who colonised us in the first place.

    There is a desperate need for more Indian representation—we need to see characters being made that are Indian, not just as a joke or for its sake. We need to see more talented Indian actors and actresses cast in films and TV shows and more opportunities given to musical artists of Indian descent so that their unique voices can be known throughout mainstream entertainment.

    Recently, Desi artists are being given more of a platform. Shows like “Never Have I Ever” show a young teenage Indian girl’s struggles, going through adolescence and coping with her social life and family. Dev Patel, a British-Indian actor, has become popular in recent years for his role in the TV show “Modern Love” and films like “Slumdog Millionaire,” and “Lion”.

    However, one area that Indians have been struggling to breakthrough is in the world of music in mainstream media. Although there are many artists of Indian descent making music, nearly none of them receive global attention and recognition due to the oppressive, cut-

    throat and blatantly racist nature of the industry, even globally.

    I would like to bring your attention to two female artists: Raveena Aurora and Paravi Das; both of Indian descent who find pride in

    their Indian culture and don’t try and appear less Indian to appeal to a Eurocentric market. It’s ironic in a melancholic sense that the very reason that they find themselves popular amongst specific demographics is the same reason they can’t seem to fit into mainstream media—in short, they’re too Indian.

    Raveena is an American born Indian artist who grew up in a traditional Sikh household. You can clearly see and hear the Indian influences of artists like Lata Mangeshkar and Ravi Shankar who were constants in her family growing up. She also often gives a homage

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    to Bollywood Blockbuster films with her music videos being as opulent and colourful as they always are.

    Paravi Das is a young singer-songwriter who first went viral with Tik Tok, before spreading to platforms like Instagram and Twitter. A 19-year-old girl who originally only sang Hindustani Classical Music as a child has become famous within selective circles for her unique voice and distinctive singing style. She’s

    also gained recognition online for her love towards her culture and showing it by incorporating it in her outfits.

    One of the reasons that both Raveena and Paravi Das have such a distinct, unique and beautiful style of singing is because they both have a background in listening to and singing Hindustani Classical Music. Paravi Das, in particular, has this unique style of singing that can only be achieved with a background in Hindustani Classical while Raveena’s voice is still heavily influenced by Western influences like Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald.

    Some advantages of learning Hindustani Classical Music includes learning skills in terms of vocals that you would otherwise not—perfect frequency, jumbling the notes, pronouncing proper vowels, maintaining uniform tone throughout, etc. These are rare techniques to see in Western Music and those that can change the landscape as mainstream media as we know it today.

    This is why we need more Desi musicians in today’s immersive and ever-changing landscape. These techniques can change the way we listen and experience music-instead of just listening to the catchy beat or the lyrics, we should be paying attention to how the song is being delivered.

    THE CROWN OF DARKNESS & LIGHT- SAMUEL JOHN JOSHY 9B

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    TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENT- By Megha Mahesh XI E

    Every aspect of modernization of science and technology has been implemented in every nation. There has been a huge advancement in the technology trends in recent years. There’s no doubt that Information Technology and Computer Science have highly evolved in many ways especially during the latest years. Latest technology has been adopted by various companies as well as schools, with digital boards and also the use of the online platform for teaching in the current scenario. The Covid-19 pandemic has caused drastic changes in many industries, and information technology is the major among them.

    Technology cannot prevent the onset of the pandemics; however it can prevent the spread, educate, warn and empower those on ground to be aware of the situation, and noticeably lessen the impact.

    Compared to the other industries, the IT industry is expected to have an enormous market boom. Computers have benefited in academe by simplifying the process of education for millions of teens, college students and post graduates. Personalized training is another trend that has arisen as a result of educational technology, mainly via the internet. In this way the individuals can learn in their own way of understanding. The aim of personalized learning is to give the students an opportunity to learn in their own way which makes them more independent. While considering the current pandemic situation there are various teleconferencing tools that help the people who are in quarantine to keep in touch with their family members and friends as well as to have conference meetings and discussions at work. During these crises people

    have understood the importance of the internet and technology as this is helping us stay safe at home while maintaining relations and being able to communicate with one another. Speaking about computers, they play a crucial part in most of our lives. Computers reduce our burden and make our work easier. Moreover, we can gain unlimited knowledge from all around the world.

    Indeed, the technology has advanced more and will continue to expand exponentially, but the institutions and societies need to accelerate in adapting to it and continue investing in building and technology systems for the preparedness. After the covid-19 outbreak it is evident that the technological innovations are helping to manage the epidemic and better equip to fight future public health emergencies in a timely, systematic and calm manner.

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    UNWELCOME VISITORSa short story by Jiya Elizabeth Jikku, IX F

    Grandfather has always been a spontaneous, ebullient spirit. Every visit of his is guaranteed to spur adventures and stories that we, ourselves, can tell our grandkids during our greying days. It is truly an unsolvable mystery how this aging man has so much energy. He fills his days conquering full-on trees, pestering grandmother till she blows her fuse and getting on to various antics along with us. He might just be allergic to staying indoors, I have never seen him waste a day away in front of a television. If we do not hear from him for too long, the mischievous and kind soul with a childlike innocence is unquestionably stirring up some trouble that grandma has to fix later.

    Just the other day, we had decided to go fishing. The entire family loaded themselves into a beat-up truck and set ahead towards the grand lake. Grandfather decided it would be a wasted opportunity to miss the annual salmon migration. He arose our interests with stories of swarms of the marvellous creatures that jumped up the streams as if they had wings to carry them up. Whoever had heard of a fish that could fly?! We certainly saw more than fish that day, however.

    The completely unplanned trip went smoothly for the first few hours. Every member of our family racked in a bountiful harvest. Even little Timmy managed to catch himself a prized, slimy salmon. My cousin, Sally, even caught an enormous catfish with silky, lengthy whiskers. First we see fish that fly, now we have gone and found a cat-fish hybrid. All of the catch was packed into a massive box for us to later wash and roast over an open campfire.

    Caught up in the merriment and excitement of the day, we were completely taken aback by the unwelcome visitor. The pungent smell of all that fish lying in the storage box was definitely not ignorable. It seemed to have attracted an unlikely creature though.

    As Uncle Sam emerged from the lake to deposit his latest catch in the box, we were startled by his shrilly scream. When we turned to check what all the ruckus was, well, let’s just say, that was definitely not the last scream of the night. A colossal brown bear was inhaling down every single fish in our box. Terrifying growls and grumbles rose from the gruesome sight as rouge blood and fish guts were swung in every direction. Everybody was too petrified to do anything about it and fairly there seems to be nothing we really can do at this point except beg the good lord to save our souls. We should have known that grandfather would not have given up that easily.

    From behind the crime scene popped up a dreadful sound of pots and pans banging profusely. Even the bear was distracted from its meal by the harrowing nuisance. Grandfather had rushed to the rescue and come up with this “genius” plan. I am hundred percent sure he did not anticipate the beast to charge at him where he was hoisted on a lofty tree. Shrieks of horror burst at the seams as the beast clawed furiously at the tree to get to what just might be another addition to his feast. Grandfather hung tightly with a humorously horror-struck expression, mumbling a dozen silent prayers all at ones. Those may have just been his last moments on this planet. But our saving grace arrived in the form of a couple blaring police cars that raced towards the scene. The bear, startled by the vehicle, scurried into the expansive forest never to be seen again. Thank god! Grandfather remained planted in his position, not daring to move a muscle. Even the reassurances from grandmother only brought him down from the tree well past the wee hours of the night. I have never seen him stay that still for so long.

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    CHRISTAMS PAPER CRAFTCATEGORY 3

    POSITION NAME OF THE STUDENTCLASS/ DIV HOUSE

    FIRST MERRYL JOHNS 9 C PERIYAR

    SECOND JACOB IJU 9 D NARMADA

    THIRD ROHAN THOMAS 9 A NARMADA

    BHUVAN SANTHOSH 9 E NARMADA

    ERINE MARIA 9 CAUVERY

    CATEGORY 4

    POSITION NAME OF THE STUDENT CLASS/ DIV HOUSE

    FIRST RUTH SARAH ABRAHAM 11 F PERIYARSECOND MUGDHA P K 11 F GANGOTRITHIRD ANN TREESA SABU 11 C GANGOTRI

    CHRISTMAS BOTTLE ARTCATEGORY 3

    POSITION NAME OF THE STUDENT CLASS/ DIV HOUSE

    FIRST RAINNA ANN 9 F NARMADASECOND ASHIKA AJITH 9 E GANGOTRI

    MERRYL JOHNS 9 C PERIYARTHIRD SAMUEL JOHN 9 B GANGOTRI

    ESHA CHERIAN 9 C CAUVERYERINE MARIA 9 CAUVERYMARIAM SAIT 10 F GANGOTRI

    CATEGORY 4

    POSITION NAME OF THE STUDENT CLASS/DIV HOUSE

    FIRST MARIA GEORGY 11B GANGOTRISECOND VAISHNAVI N 11 D NARMADA

    NEHA M VIJU 11 C CAUVERYTHIRD AMMU GEORGE 11C NARMADA

    CHRISTMAS GIFT WRAPPINGCATEGORY 3

    POSITION NAME OF THE STUDENT CLASS/ DIV HOUSE

    FIRST RAINA ANN 9 F NARMADASECOND MERRYL JOHNS 9 C PERIYARTHIRD AMAL S NAIR 9 E PERIYAR

    CATEGORY 4

    POSITION NAME OF THE STUDENT CLASS/ DIV HOUSE

    FIRST VAISHNAVI N 11 D NARMADASECOND MARIA GEORGY 11 B GANGOTRI

    CHRISTMAS TREE DECORATIONCATEGORY 3

    POSITION NAME OF THE STUDENT CLASS/DIV HOUSE

    FIRST RAINNA ANN 9 F NARMADAJIYA ELIZABETH 9 F GANGOTRI

    SECOND SONIA NAVIN 9 B NARMADATHIRD SAMUEL JOHN 9 B GANGOTRICATEGORY 4

    POSITION NAME OF THE STUDENT CLASS/DIV HOUSE

    FIRST RISHAAN JACOB 12 A GANGOTRI

    STAR SEARCH RESULTS - CHRISTMAS EVENTS

  • 16

    CREATIVE GALLERIA

    JOSEPH ABRAHAM 11E

    DIGITAL ART PERSPECTIVE SURREALISM

    SNEHA SUSAN CHERIAN

    11F

    VAISHNAVI V. DEVI, 11D

  • 17

    INVITATION TO WRITE IN CHOICE PULSE

    The Editors of the Choice Pulse monthly newsletter invite students, parents and teachers of the Senior School to submit short creatives in the form of

    articles, stories, poems, paintings, photographs etc. to be published in the newsletter. All entries are to be forwarded to

    [email protected]

    Kindly note that submission of an article does not guarantee publication and that the overall editorial control is retained by the Editorial Team.

    CHOICE PULSE

    FOR PRIVATE CIRCULATION ONLY

    Designed and Published by the Senior Secondary Section, The Choice School

    Editor In Chief: Mr Philip Jolly Copy Editor: Ms Beena Issac

    Student Editors: Shuha Misbah (XI E), Gopika G (XD), Lakshmi Neeliyath Othayoth (IX D)

    Editorial Correspondence: [email protected]