ASIAN REGION ADVANCED COMBAT AIRCRAFT ADVANCED COMBAT AIRCRAFT Publisher Marilyn Tangye Butler ...

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Transcript of ASIAN REGION ADVANCED COMBAT AIRCRAFT ADVANCED COMBAT AIRCRAFT Publisher Marilyn Tangye Butler ...

  • DEFENCE | STRATEGIC AFFAIRS | HOMELAND SECURITY | BUSINESS | EXPORTS AND TRADE | TECHNOLOGY | ANALYSIS

    APRIL 2020 VOLUME 14, NUMBER 2 MICA (P) 150/03/2007

    SYRIAN CONFLICT: RECENT LESSONS LEARNED

    MALAYSIA’S DEFENCE POLICY DISARRAY

    MILITARY VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES

    ASIAN REGION ADVANCED COMBAT AIRCRAFT

  • D E F E N S E . M O B I L I T Y . S Y S T E M S

    A R Q U U S - D E F E N S E . C O M

    V A B M K 3

    P R O T E C T I O NC E R T I F I E D D E F E N S ES U R V I V A B I L I T Y E A S E O F

    M A I N T E N A N C E

    Arquus_VAB_MK3_235x275_Stand.indd 1 30/03/2020 13:51

  • ARQUUA PAGE 2

    DEFENCE | STRATEGIC AFFAIRS | HOMELAND SECURITY | BUSINESS | EXPORTS AND TRADE | TECHNOLOGY | ANALYSIS

    APRIL 2020 VOLUME 14, NUMBER 2 MICA (P) 150/03/2007

    SYRIAN CONFLICT: RECENT LESSONS LEARNED

    MALAYSIA’S DEFENCE POLICY DISARRAY

    MILITARY VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES

    ASIAN REGION ADVANCED COMBAT AIRCRAFT

    Publisher Marilyn Tangye Butler marilyn.tangye@asianpressgroup.com.sg Phone: +61 410 529 324

    Editor Kym Bergmann kym.bergmann@asianpressgroup.com.sg Phone: + 61 412 539 106

    Design tdixondesign@gmail.com

    Contributors Arie Egozi, Dzirhan Mahadzir, Mike Yeo, Mark Farrer, Vladimir Karnozov, Richard Gardner, Guy Martin, Geoff Slocombe, Chen Chuanren

    Head Office Singapore Asian Press Group Pte Ltd Raymond Boey, Regional Manager Block 729 #04-4280, Ang Mo Kio, Avenue 6 Singapore 560729 Phone: +65 6457 2340 Fax: +65 6456 2700 raymond.boey@asianpressgroup.com.sg

    Subscriptions Rose Jeffree subscriptions@asianpressgroup.com.sg

    Australia, NZ & Asia Pacific Graham Joss Sales Director Phone: +61 2 9526 7188 Fax: +61 2 9526 1779 Mobile +61 (0) 419 492 836 graham.joss@venturamedia.net

    USA, CANADA & South America Susan Spilman-Gardner Phone +1 817-751-5888 USAds.APDR@gmail.com

    Europe Diana Scogna Mobile: +33 6 6252 2547 Fax: +33 1 7079 0534 dscogna@dsmedia.com.fr

    RUSSIA/ CIS STATES Yuri Laskin, Sergei Kirshin Laguk Co Ltd Phone: +7 495 912 1346 Fax: +7 495 912 1260 ylarm-lml@mtu-net.ru

    Israel Asa Talbar, Talbar Media Phone: +972-77-562-1900 Fax: +972-77-562-1903 talbar@talbar.co.il

    Printer Times Printers Pte Ltd Defence Review Asia Asian Press Group Pte Ltd Printed and published in Singapore Registration: 200611219N MICA (P) 150/03/2007 ISSN 1834-6928

    April 2019 - Readership: 9433

    © ASIAN PRESS GROUP Pte Ltd

    SOUTH CHINA SEA (March 13, 2020) An F-35B Lightning II fighter aircraft assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 (Reinforced), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), prepares to take off from amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA-6). America, flagship of the America Expeditionary Strike Group, 31st MEU team, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Brittenham)

     REGULARS 4 Editorial COVID-19: what the world can learn from Asia

     NEWS 6 XBoeing additional P-8A contract SM-3 multi-year order

    8 Damen completes Indonesian frigate trials 9 Gripen-F production underway AAR and Sumitomo announce JV

    10 AEHF-6 satellite actively communicating 7th BMD-capable destroyer enters service in Japan

    Hyundai contract for FFX-III frigate

    Contributor’s opinions do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or editor and while every precaution has been taken to ensure that the information contained in this publication is accurate and timely, no liability is accepted by the publisher or editor for errors and omissions, however caused. Articles and information contained in this publication are the copyright of Asian Press Group Pte Ltd (unless otherwise stated) and cannot be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publisher. The publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to uncommissioned photographs, manuscripts or other media.

    Follow us on Twitter: @DRA_PAC Follow us on Facebook: Defence Review Asia

     FEATURES

    12 Fifth generation fighter options for Asia Not everyone can afford an F-35

    20 Russia and Turkey test their latest equipment in Syria Especially drones, UCAVs and missile systems

    24 China’s Special Mission and EW aircraft Numbers and capabilities both on the rise

    26 Malaysia’s defence procurement in disarray Coronavirus, politics and economic headaches

    32 Israel’s future armoured combat vehicles being defined A high degree of autonomy being sought

    36 RTAF outlines procurement plans A modest level of modernisation

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    DefenceReviewAsia | APR 2020 3

  • SAFRAN PAGE 5

    EDITORIAL

    COVID-19: WHAT THE WORLD CAN LEARN FROM ASIA

    T he COVID-19 pandemic is spreading too quickly throughout the world for an analysis to be made of its human and economic toll – other than to say it will be huge. The U.S. and Europe are now in the firing line, with Africa and many of Asia’s poorer countries – such as Indonesia – also at very great risk. India has put in place drastic public health measures, but in such a populous country with patchy access to high quality medical treatment the consequences of a runaway virus will be tragic.

    Before we get to the good – and there are many lessons that can be learned already – let us deal with the bad. The Government of China is partially responsible for this global tragedy because it was too slow in responding to the emerging crisis and then outrageously did its best to cover up just how serious the COVID-19 outbreak was. If China had acted with greater speed and transparency in Wuhan, there was a chance that the virus could have been nipped in the bud – or more realistically that its explosive rate of transmission might have been slowed to something more manageable.

    A very brief history of the pandemic shows that China’s doctors and scientists were actually on the ball. The first cases of the virus were detected in mid-November 2019 and public health professionals quickly understood the seriousness of the situation, as the number of people with SARS-like symptoms akin to pneumonia grew steadily throughout December – though still in manageable numbers. By the end of that month it is believed that there were around 60 cases confined to Wuhan and surrounding Hubei province.

    By January 10 Chinese scientists had not only identified the virus but placed its RNA sequencing on a public website, which was a very

    worthwhile thing to do. However, by this point the Government had already stepped in and one of its first and shameful moves was to attempt to discredit eight doctors who had gone public on the matter, one of whom - Li Wenliang - died from the virus. He had previously been reprimanded by the police for spreading “false rumours” about the disease because on December 30 he sent a warning message to his colleagues about the extreme danger they all faced.

    On January 20, Chinese authorities admitted that human-to-human transmission was occurring; three days later Hubei province was put in lockdown. But as even the most casual observer now knows – except for viewers of Fox News – given the rate of transmission of the illness, this was shutting the epidemiological stable door well after the viral horse had bolted. This brief analysis disregards the nonsensical claim and counterclaim – unsupported by any evidence - that this was all a biological warfare attack blamed on either the U.S. or China by the other side.

    China is not going to be held accountable for this – that’s not how the world works. However, given the Government’s generally poor record of dealing with these sorts of issues – they were slow in reacting to SARS and swine flu has killed about one quarter of the world’s pigs – there will hopefully be a recognition in Beijing’s corridors of power that lies, deceit and cover ups are the worst possible approach to pandemics. The country has already suffered through loss of life, a period of economic stagnation and further reputational damage. This, incidentally, is a lesson that the Trump administration might be learning for similar reasons with the U.S. on its current trajectory likely to remain the world’s epicentre for the next few weeks.

    As well as hopefully learning the lessons of a need for honesty, openness and transparency the Government of China finally needs to crack down on the many sources of animal- to-human virus transmission – but particularly the gruesome semi-legal wet markets that

    operate around the country. To this should be added the international trade in animal parts from endangered species, such as tigers and rhinoceroses, which is illegal and inhumane. All reputable medical experts are united in explaining that as humans encroach further into natural habitants and start to kill and eat whatever they find there – bats being the current salient example – the greater the risks of COVID-19 type inf