Anticipatory Set

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Anticipatory Set. Read the quote from David McCullough – mark any phrases or words that stand out for you Think about what is important about what he says – write down your thinking about what he said. Author Says/I Say group processings Three pairings. Here’s Life in the Past Lane !. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Ten Important Events in History

Anticipatory SetRead the quote from David McCullough mark any phrases or words that stand out for youThink about what is important about what he says write down your thinking about what he said.Author Says/I Say group processingsThree pairings.Heres Life in the Past Lane!Historical ThinkingBrochureEvents can be viewed from the perspectives of a Historian, an Economist, a Geographer, or a Political Scientist (others, too)Each asks a specific kind of question. Consider these questions when developing your unit plan.

Ten Important Events in HistoryWhat are your thoughts?Combining our ideasThe strategy we will experience encourages the three following ways of thinking about our History lists:Making Connections to Prior KnowledgeDetermining ImportanceSubstantive ConversationProcessingIndividually, look over your list and star your top five these are your non-negotiables. Consider the following questions:Did the events on the lists fit into the first three eras of US History?Why did you think these events were important to have on the list? What was your justification?The Group ProcessIndividually, look over your list and star your top five your non-negotiables.In a group of 4, you will combine all of your lists: one person will write his/her list of 5 on the chart paper.Each person will then add each event/historical occurrence on his/her list if it has not already been added.We will put them all up on the board to observe the similarities and differences of the lists.ProcessingDid the events on the lists fit into the first three eras of US History?Why did you think these events were important to have on the list? What was your justification?QARQuestion/Answer RelationshipStrategy for Reading Informational TextWhy use QAR?Helps students relate prior knowledge to new textual information.Helps students to become aware of the relationship between questions and their answers.Helps students know the different types of questions.Helps students to analyze, comprehend, and respond to text concepts.

Types of Questions/AnswersIn the BookRight There! answers may be one word, one phrase, one sentence (text explicit - literal)In what years did Lewis and Clark travel in the west?Think and Search answers will be found in more than one place and will be combined to form the final answer. (text implicit)Why would it be a difficult task to study a snow leopard?Types of Questions/AnswersIn My HeadAuthor and Me answers will will use what the author has said in the text along with the readers prior knowledge and experiencesWhy might enslaved people in the South be excited by the stories about Tice Davis?On My Own answers will be based on the readers understandings, opinions, values, experiences. I may not need to read to answer. (script implicit)What qualities might a school district look for in a new teacher?

York, A Little Known Black HeroYork, A Little Known Black Hero. By Ann KeefeCobblestone Magazine, "The Lewis & Clark Expedition, 1804 - 1806"Read the article, York, A Little Known Black Hero. By Ann Keefe, and answer the following questions. Remember to consider the Question and Answer Relationships.

What kinds of questions are these?From what document do we find out about York?Who do you think was the author of York's adventures in this original document?What were some of the hardships that the explorers suffered on their journey?Why is it important to share the stories of men like York with modern Americans?What modern hardships do people have to endure?

What kinds of questions are these?From what document do we find out about York? RTWho do you think was the author of York's adventures in this original document? AMWhat were some of the hardships that the explorers suffered on their journey? TSWhy is it important to share the stories of men like York with modern Americans? OOWhat modern hardships do people have to endure? OO

What kinds of questions are these?What made York a valuable member of the Lewis & Clark journey?"We can tell a lot about a person by what is not said." This is a statement from the story. What does it meanWhat items did York use to trade for food to get the expedition over the Rockies?Would a journey like this interest you if you were a slave and you knew you could earn your freedom at the end? Why or why not?What incident in the story shows that even a hero can make mistakes?

What kinds of questions are these?What made York a valuable member of the Lewis & Clark journey? TS"We can tell a lot about a person by what is not said." This is a statement from the story. What does it mean? AM/OOWhat items did York use to trade for food to get the expedition over the Rockies? TSWould a journey like this interest you if you were a slave and you knew you could earn your freedom at the end? Why or why not? OOWhat incident in the story shows that even a hero can make mistakes? RT

How to implementStudents need to be taught the four types of questions in a structured teacher-led session.Students need to be gradually released to do this kind of work. (What is Gradual Release??)After reading, viewing, or listening to text, students will answer teacher-prepared questionsOR Students may work in small groups to write questions about the material, then trade with another group, who will answer their questions.

Possible use in your unitFind and print an article as part of your unit design for one of the GLCEs. These can be from a magazine (Cobblestone, MI History for Kids, Faces), textbook (History Alive), or from a reliable internet site (PBS, Library of Congress, a museum, etc.)Write questions: Right There, Think and Search, Author and Me, and On your OwnUse to teach the content of one of your GLCEs.Write it up as an Instructional Strategy for your Weebly.

Write a RAFTR = Role: William Clark or York

A = Audience: Folks back East

F = Format: Newspaper Headline

T = Topic: Conditions on the ExpeditionExample: Frostbite to Mosquito Bite: Hardships Galore!Artifacts ActivityYou will receive a bag and in this bag are 3-4 primary source artifacts.These are the kinds of things that might be uncovered in an archaeological dig.Archaeologists and other historians would use these artifacts to tell a story about the person or culture who may have used them.As you CAREFULLY remove the items one at a time from the bag, consider the following questionsQuestions to ConsiderLook at this artifact from every angle.Does it have any identifying marks on it?From what material is this object made?How do you think it was used?Does it look like anything used today?Who might have used this artifact?What do you think it is?

Whats new with Literature Circles for Informational Text?When you think about literature circles, what words / phrases come to mind?

23Whats New with Literature Circles?Harvey Daniels, 2008

1. De-emphasis on role sheets. Instead, capturing kids responses using post-it notes, text annotation, bookmarks, journals.

2. More use of drawn or graphic responses to text.

3. More explicit teaching of social skills (Minilessons for Literature Circles, Daniels and Steineke, 2004).

4. Not just novels. More use of short text stories, poems, articles, charts, graphs, cartoons.

5. More nonfiction text, from articles through adult trade books.

24Whats New with Literature Circles?Harvey Daniels, 20086. Reaching out across the curriculum: book clubs in science, social studies, etc.

7. Sparking or supplementing out-loud discussion with written conversations.

8. Multi-text Literature Circles (jigsawed text sets, theme sets (Richison et al, 2004), multigenre inquiries).

9. New forms of assessment. Fewer reports and book talks. More performances (readers theater, tableaux, found poetry, song lyrics, etc).

10. Moving from books to topics. From Literature Circles to broader Inquiry Groups (see Stephanie Harveys Nonfiction Matters (Stenhouse, 2000) and the forthcoming Kids Want to Know: From Literature Circles to Inquiry Groups by Stephanie Harvey and Harvey Daniels (Heinemann, Fall 2008).

25Nonfiction Literature CircleGroups of Four (or Five) -( think about how many students you have and how many articles you were able to obtain.)Talk briefly about Ancient Egypt What do you know?26ProcedureReading: Each person in your group is reading something different, but related.Silently read your article, and mark words, lines, or sections of the text that stick out for you. Consider: thoughts and responses to this article, reminders of your past experiences, people, or events in your own education, events currently in the news, or in other materials you have read. Did you learn something?27Sharing your ThinkingEach person takes one to two minutes (no more) to give the group a brief summary and a personal reaction to their article.Dont just read them the article talk about it and what connections it brings to your mind. Make it meaningful for your group.Group Reactions / ConnectionsWhat were your thoughts and responses to this article?Did you learn something? Would your students?Did it remind you of past experiences, people, or events in your classroom/your education?Did it make you think of anything happening in the news, or in other materials you have read?29

Writing response: What is the value of non-fiction literature circles?30Art and HistoryHistorical Perspective through Artistic RepresentationProcedureProvide a variety of art From the Era or event you are studying.

Boston Massacre10 by 10In small groups of 3 or 4, students will look carefully at the artwork or photo.They will write down 10 observations of the piece, answering the question, What do you see?They will then write 10 questions that they would want answered about the work.Questions you may Co