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Transcript of Amplify ELA & Amplify Reading · PDF file 2018. 9. 27. · Grade 6 4 |Amplify...

Amplify ELA & Amplify Reading
© 2018 Amplify Education, Inc. All trademarks and copyrights are the property of Amplify or its licensors.
Table of contents
Setting and Mood 4
Logos 5
Setting and Mood 7
Logos 9
Setting and Mood 11
Logos 13
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 6 texts
Chapter 1: Arguments and Their Structure
If your students are reading Boy, they can
• Include claim, evidence, and reason in written responses to the text.
• Identify the the claims and evidence in Dahl’s descriptions of characters (e.g., Mrs.
Pratchett, Mr. Coombes, the Matron) or ideas (e.g., the importance of a tuck-box) and
rewrite his descriptions as simple, three-sentence arguments.
If your students are reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, they can • Include claim, evidence, and reason in written responses to the text.
• Identify the claims and evidence in Twain’s descriptions of characters (e.g., Tom Sawyer,
Aunt Polly, Becky Thatcher) or ideas (e.g., childhood) and rewrite his descriptions as
simple, three-sentence arguments.
If your students are reading texts from the Chocolate Collection, they can
• Include claim, evidence, and reason in written responses to the texts.
• Identify the authors’ claims and analyze whether they are supported by evidence
and reasons.
If your students are reading Boy, they can
• Analyze the mood conveyed by descriptions of settings such as the sweet-shop (Chapter 1) and St. Peter’s (Chapter 10).
If your students are reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, they can
• Analyze the mood conveyed by descriptions of settings such as Saturday morning before the whitewashing incident (Chapter 2, paragraph 1) and the “desolate places” Tom seeks
after being punished (Chapter 3, paragraph 23).
If your students are reading “The Speckled Band,” they can
• Analyze the mood conveyed by Helen Stoner’s description of the night her sister died (paragraph 50).
• Analyze the mood conveyed by the authors’ description Dr. Grimesby Roylott’s house (paragraph 132).
Grade 6
Grade 6
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 6 texts
Chapter 4: Word Choice and Tone
If your students are reading texts from the Chocolate Collection, they can
• Write a descriptive paragraph about chocolate from the point of view of the men pictured in the photograph “Men drinking hot chocolate on return from long Antarctic journey.” They should choose their words in order to convey a particular tone (e.g., admiring) toward chocolate.
• Read “Appendix C Statement from Labour in Portuguese West Africa” and analyze Cadbury’s tone toward the situation on the cocoa estates in S. Thomé.
• Analyze Rita Dove’s tone toward chocolate in “Chocolate” from American Smooth.
If your students are reading texts from The Greeks they can
• Analyze Zeus’ and Prometheus’ contrasting tones towards man’s life without fire in “Prometheus.”
• Analyze Odysseus’ tone toward the cyclops before and after meeting him in The Odyssey.
If your students are reading M.C. Higgins, the Great, they can • Analyze M.C.’s tone toward various characters, locations, and ideas.
Chapter 5: Logos
If your students are reading texts from the Chocolate Collection, they can
• Read “Prehistoric Americans Traded Chocolate for Turquoise?” from National Geographic News, identify the claims made by the archeologists, and explain how they used logical reasoning to arrive at these claims.
• Identify and analyze the logos and pathos arguments made by the author of “Is It Fair to Eat Chocolate?” from Skipping Stones.
• Read “Can Chocolate Be Good for My Health?” and/or “Dark Chocolate: A Bittersweet Pill to Take” and make a logos argument supporting the claim that chocolate should be consumed in moderation.
If your students are reading texts from The Greeks, they can
• Analyze how Prometheus uses logic to determine that man is living in “ignorance” without fire in “Prometheus.”
• Write a logos argument supporting Arachne’s view of the gods in “Arachne.” Make generalizations about the gods based off of the specific incidents Arachne portrays in her tapestry.
If your students are reading texts from the Titanic Collection, they can
• Read “Discovery of the Titanic” and explain how Robert Ballard’s crew used logical reasoning to pinpoint the location of the Titanic’s remains.
• Read “The Iceberg Was Only Part of It” from The New York Times and explain how scientists used logical reasoning to support the claim that “rare states of nature played major roles in the catastrophe.”
Grade 6
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 6 texts
Chapter 6: Figurative Language
If your students are reading “Prometheus,” they can
• Analyze the author’s use of figurative language when depicting man’s first experiences with fire. Map the tenor and vehicle for each figure of speech and explain what ideas they communicate.
If your students are reading M.C. Higgins, the Great, they can
• Analyze M.C. Higgins’ use of figurative language in his descriptions of the mountain and various characters. Map the tenor and vehicle for each figure of speech and explain what ideas they communicate.
• Analyze the use of figurative language to convey cowardliness in Chapter 6—“Women and Children First!” from Sinking of the Titanic and Great Sea Disasters.
• Analyze the speaker’s use of figurative language in “Untitled Poem.” Map the tenor and vehicle for each figure of speech and explain what ideas they communicate.
• Use figurative language to recreate with words the imagery in The Sinking of the Titanic, by Max Beckmann.
Chapter 7: Ethos
If your students are reading The Odyssey, they can
• Analyze how Odysseus uses ethos to try to convince the cyclops to give him and his men hospitality in Chapter 9. Then explain why this kind of argument has no effect on the cyclops.
If your students are reading texts from the Titanic Collection, they can
• Summarize the claims made by the makers and marketers of the Titanic. Then analyze how the excerpt from Chapter 7—“There Is Your Beautiful Nightdress Gone”— from A Night to Remember destroys the credibility of those who made these claims.
• Analyze how the “Amalgamated Musicians Union Poster” uses ethos to argue for the heroism of the musicians who died aboard the Titanic.
• Analyze how the author of Excerpt: Chapter 6—“Women and Children First!” from Sinking of the Titanic and Great Sea Disasters uses ethos arguments to discredit the “coward” who survived.
Grade 6
Grade 6
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 7 texts
Chapter 1: Arguments and Their Structure
If your students are reading Red Scarf Girl, they can
• Include claim, evidence, and reason in written responses to the text.
• Write simple, three-sentence arguments about what ideas the Cultural Revolution propaganda posters are designed to convey.
• Identify the claims and evidence in Jiang’s descriptions of characters (e.g., her family members, the well-dressed man in “Destroy the Four Olds,” her classmates ) and rewrite her descriptions as simple, three-sentence arguments.
• Identify the claims, evidence, and reasons in the da-zi-bao written by Ji-li’s classmates in Red Scarf Girl.
• Identify the claims, evidence, and reasons in arguments for and against the portrayal of Ji-li’s grandfather as an “exploiter.”
If your students are reading texts from Character and Conflict, they can
• Include claim, evidence, and reason in written responses to the text.
• Identify the claims and evidence in Hansberry’s and McCullers’ descriptions of characters or ideas and rewrite their descriptions as simple, three-sentence arguments.
If your students are reading Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science, they can
• Include claim, evidence, and reason in written responses to the text.
• Identify the claims made by the author and/or various scientists and doctors in the text and analyze whether they are supported by evidence and reasons.
Chapter 2: Setting and Mood
If your students are reading Red Scarf Girl, they can
• Analyze the mood conveyed by the descriptions of Ji-li’s school in the first paragraph of “The Liberation Army Dancer” and Ji-li’s apartment in paragraph 17 of “The Liberation Army Dancer.”
• Contrast the mood conveyed by the description of Grandpa Hong’s bookstall at the beginning of “Destroy the Four Olds!” with the description of The Great Prosperity Market in that chapter.
• Contrast the mood conveyed by descriptions of Ji-li’s apartment before and after the raid by the Red Guards in “A Search in Passing.”
If your students are reading A Raisin in the Sun, they can
• Analyze the mood conveyed by the author’s description of the Youngers’ apartment at the beginning of Act I, Scene One.
If your students are reading “The Cask of Amontillado,” they can
• Contrast the mood created by the description of the carnival setting in which the narrator encounters Fortunato with the mood evoked by his description of the catacombs later in the story.
Grade 7
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 7 texts
Chapter 3: Pathos
If your students are reading A Raisin in the Sun, they can
• Analyze various characters’ use of pathos to try to convince one another:
• Walter’s attempts to convince Ruth to be on his “side”
• Beneatha’s attempts to convince her family not to disparage her ambitions
• Mr. Lindner’s attempt to convince the Youngers not to move into their new home
• Asagai’s attempts to convince Beneatha not to give up hope
• Ruth’s attempt to convince Mama that they need to move
• Mama’s attempts to convince her family to do what she thinks is right
If your students are reading “The Tell-Tale Heart,” they can
• Explain how the narrator attempts to use pathos to convince the reader that the old man’s eye is evil and must be destroyed.
If your students are reading “The Cask of Amontillado,” they can
• Analyze how Montresor uses pathos to persuade Fortunato to accompany him home— while making it seem like this is Fortunato’s own idea.
Chapter 4: Word Choice and Tone
If your students are reading A Raisin in the Sun, they can
• Contrast Beneatha’s tone toward George Murchison with her tone toward Joseph Asagai.
• Contrast Walter’s tone toward his family in different scenes.
If your students are reading Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science, they can
• Analyze the author’s tone toward Phineas as he describes Phineas in the hours after his accident (“‘Horrible’ Accident in Vermont”).
• Analyze the tone that Phineas’s former friends convey toward him after he changes as a result of his accident (“‘Horrible’ Accident in Vermont”).
• Analyze the author’s tone toward the doctors in “What We Thought About How We Thought.”
If your students are reading “The Tell-Tale Heart,” they can
• Analyze how the narrator conveys a tone of revulsion toward the old man’s eye.
• Analyze how the narrator conveys a tone of exasperation toward the police
If your students are reading Romeo and Juliet, they can
• Compare and contrast Romeo’s and Juliet’s tones toward one another in the balcony and death scenes.
• Contrast Romeo’s tone in the fight scene before and after Mercutio’s death.
Grade 7
Grade 7
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 7 texts
Chapter 5: Logos
If your students are reading Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science, they can
• Write logos arguments supporting the claims that Phineas is lucky and unlucky.
If your students are reading “The Tell-Tale Heart,” they can
• Explain how the narrator attempts to use logical reasoning to convince the reader that he is not mad.
If your students are reading texts from the Gold Rush Collection, they can
• Read “California Culinary Experiences” from The Overland Monthly and use evidence from the text to construct a logos argument explaining how or why the culinary skills of gold prospectors improved over time.
• Read “Letter the Tenth: Amateur Mining—Hairbreadth ’Scapes, &c.” from The Shirley Letters from California Mines in 1851–1852 and use evidence from the text to construct a logos argument explaining why gold prospecting was a risky venture.
• Read Chapter 3—“The Magic Equation” from California: The Great Exception and explain how scientists used logical reasoning to support the claim that “gold production did more harm than good to the economy of California.”
Chapter 6: Figurative Language
If your students are reading texts from the Poetry & Poe unit, they can
• Analyze the use of literal and figurative language in “The White Horse,” “The Silence,” and/ or “A narrow fellow in the grass.” Map the tenor and vehicle for each figure of speech and explain what ideas are communicated.
• Analyze how the narrator in “The Tell-Tale Heart” describes certain sights and sounds. Does he use this language literally or figuratively?
If your students are reading Romeo and Juliet, they can
• Analyze the characters’ use of figurative language by mapping the tenor and vehicle for each figure of speech and explaining what ideas are communicated in:
• The encounter scene
• The balcony scene
• The fight scene
• The death scene
If your students are reading texts from the Gold Rush Collection, they can
• Read “California Culinary Experiences” from The Overland Monthly and analyze the author’s use of figurative language to create humor.
Grade 7
Grade 7
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 7 texts
• Use figurative language to recreate with words the imagery in The Gold Seeker, Kelloggs & Comstock (Publisher), The Last War-Whoop by A. F. Tait, or California Gold Diggers. Mining Operations on the Western Shore of the Sacramento River, Kelloggs & Comstock (Publisher).
• Analyze the author’s use of figurative language in Chapter 3—“The Magic Equation” from California: The Great Exception. Map the tenor and vehicle for each figure of speech and explain what ideas they communicate.
Chapter 7: Ethos
If your students are reading texts from the Gold Rush Collection, they can
• Read “California Culinary Experiences” from The Overland Monthly and analyze how the author uses ethos to support arguments about how or why the culinary skills of gold prospectors improved over time.
• Read “Letter the Tenth: Amateur Mining—Hairbreadth ’Scapes, &c.” from The Shirley Letters from California Mines in 1851–1852 and analyze how the author uses ethos to support her claim that gold prospecting was a risky venture.
Grade 7
Grade 8
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 8 texts
Chapter 1: Arguments and Their Structure
If your students are reading Going Solo, they can
• Include claim, evidence, and reason in written responses to the text.
• Identify the claims and evidence in Dahl’s descriptions of characters (e.g., the passengers on the SS Mantola, Mdisho, David Coke) or ideas (e.g., war) and rewrite his descriptions as simple, three-sentence arguments.
If your students are reading texts from Biography & Literature, they can
• Include claim, evidence, and reason in written responses to the texts.
• Identify the claims and evidence in Isaacson’s descriptions of Franklin in “The founding father who winks at us,” “Franklin the Scientist,” and “Franklin Gets in Character.”
• Identify the claims, evidence, and reasons in The Declaration of Independence.
If your students are reading texts from Liberty & Equality, they can
• Include claim, evidence, and reason in written responses to the texts.
• Identify claims and evidence in Douglass’s descriptions of people, places, and ideas in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave and rewrite his descriptions as simple, three-sentence arguments.
Chapter 2: Setting and Mood
If your students are reading Going Solo, they can
• Analyze the mood conveyed by descriptions of settings:
• Onboard the SS Mantola in “The Voyage Out”
• Camping out on the road outside Dar es Salaam in “The Beginning of War”
• Roald’s house the night his sword goes missing in “Mdisho of the Mwanumwezi”
• The officers’ mess in “First Encounter with a Bandit”
• The battle scene in “The Battle of Athens – the Twentieth of April”
If your students are reading The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, they can
• Analyze the mood evoked by Douglass’s descriptions of slave songs in Chapter 2.
• Contrast the mood evoked by descriptions of the slave quarters in Chapter 2 with the mood evoked by descriptions of the horse stables in Chapter 3.
• Analyze the mood evoked by descriptions of settings such as Colonel Lloyd’s plantation in Chapter 5 and the Baltimore docks in Chapter 10.
If your students are reading Gris Grimly’s Frankenstein, they can
• Write descriptions of settings as illustrated by Gris Grimly, choosing words carefully to evoke particular moods.
• Analyze the mood conveyed by Shelley’s descriptions of settings such as Montanvert and its surroundings in Volume II, Chapter 2 and the locations Victor and Elizabeth visit in Volume III, Chapters 5 and 6.
Grade 8
Grade 8
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 8 texts
Chapter 3: Pathos
If your students are reading texts from Biography & Literature, they can
• Analyze how Franklin uses pathos in his letters as Silence Dogood.
• Analyze how Franklin uses pathos in his Socratic Method.
• Analyze how the authors use pathos in The Declaration of Independence.
If your students are reading The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, they can
• Analyze Douglass’s use of pathos in his narrative.
• Write an argument for the abolition of slavery using details from The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave to create pathos appeals.
If your students are reading Gris Grimly’s Frankenstein, they can
• Analyze how Frankenstein uses pathos arguments to convince the reader that the creature is a “wretch” worthy of antipathy.
• Analyze how the creature uses pathos arguments to convince Frankenstein to create a female companion.
Chapter 4: Word Choice and Tone
If your students are reading texts from Biography & Literature, they can
• Explain how Franklin’s word choices support Isaacson’s descriptions of his tone in “Introducing Silence Dogood,” “Franklin’s Conversational Style,” “Franklin Gets in Character,” and “Franklin’s Autobiography.”
If your students are reading The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, they can
• Analyze the tone Douglass conveys toward the various slaveholders he encountered.
• Contrast the tone Douglass conveys toward Mrs. Auld before and after her transformation.
• Analyze the tone Douglass conveys toward his descriptions of characters such as the boys who taught him to read and write (Chapter 5), the enslaved man who gave him the root (Chapter 10), and the enslaved people who joined him for secret lessons (Chapter 10).
Grade 8
Amplify Reading 6–8 Book 1 Chapters
Optional activities connecting Amplify Reading 6–8 topics to Amplify ELA Grade 8 texts
If your students are reading Gris Grimly’s Frankenstein, they can
• Analyze Victor’s tone toward:
• Elizabeth and Henry when he first introduces them in Volume 1, Chapter 1
• His scientific endeavors in Volume 1, Chapter 3
• The creature when he first comes to life in Volume 1, Chapter 4
• The creature during their encounters in Volume 1, Chapter 6, Volume 2, Chapter 2, Volume 3, Chapter 2, and Volume 3, Chapter 7
• Justine in Volume 1,…