Algebra unit 4.1

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Unit 4.1

Transcript of Algebra unit 4.1

  • UNIT 4.1 USING GRAPHS TO RELATE TWO QUANTITIES

  • Warm UpState whether each word or phrase represents an amount that is increasing, decreasing, or constant.

    1. stays the same2. rises3. drops4. slows downconstantdecreasingdecreasingincreasing

  • Match simple graphs with situations.Graph a relationship.

    Objectives

  • continuous graphdiscrete graph

    Vocabulary

  • Graphs can be used to illustrate many different situations. For example, trends shown on a cardiograph can help a doctor see how a patients heart is functioning. To relate a graph to a given situation, use key words in the description.

  • Example 1: Relating Graphs to SituationsEach day several leaves fall from a tree. One day a gust of wind blows off many leaves. Eventually, there are no more leaves on the tree. Choose the graph that best represents the situation. Step 1 Read the graphs from left to right to show time passing.

  • Step 2 List key words in order and decide which graph shows them. Slanting downwardrapidlyGraphs A, B, and CNever horizontalGraph BSlanting downward until reaches zeroGraphs A, B, and C Step 3 Pick the graph that shows all the key phrases in order. The correct graph is B.Example 1 Continued

    Key Words Segment DescriptionGraphsEach day several leaves fallWind blows offmany leavesEventually no more leaves

  • Check It Out! Example 1The air temperature increased steadily for several hours and then remained constant. At the end of the day, the temperature increased slightly before dropping sharply. Choose the graph that best represents this situation. Step 1 Read the graphs from left to right to show time passing .

  • Step 2 List key words in order and decide which graph shows them. Slanting upwardGraph CHorizontalGraphs A, B, and CSlanting upward and then steeply downward Graphs B and C Step 3 Pick the graph that shows all the key phrases in order. The correct graph is graph C.Check It Out! Example 1 Continued

    Key Words Segment Description GraphsIncreased steadilyRemained constantIncreased slightly before dropping sharply

  • As seen in Example 1, some graphs are connected lines or curves called continuous graphs. Some graphs are only distinct points. They are called discrete graphsThe graph on theme park attendance is an example of a discrete graph. It consists of distinct points because each year is distinct and people are counted in whole numbers only. The values between whole numbers are not included, since they have no meaning for the situation.

  • Example 2A: Sketching Graphs for SituationsSketch a graph for the situation. Tell whether the graph is continuous or discrete.A truck driver enters a street, drives at a constant speed, stops at a light, and then continues.The graph is continuous.As time passes during the trip (moving left to right along the x-axis) the truck's speed (y-axis) does the following: initially increases remains constant decreases to a stop increases remains constant

  • Example 2B: Sketching Graphs for SituationsSketch a graph for the situation. Tell whether the graph is continuous or discrete.A small bookstore sold between 5 and 8 books each day for 7 days.The graph is discrete.The number of books sold (y-axis) varies for each day (x-axis).Since the bookstore accounts for the number of books sold at the end of each day, the graph is 7 distinct points.

  • Check It Out! Example 2aSketch a graph for the situation. Tell whether the graph is continuous or discrete.Jamie is taking an 8-week keyboarding class. At the end of each week, she takes a test to find the number of words she can type per minute. She improves each week.The graph is discrete.Each week (x-axis) her typing speed is measured. She gets a separate score (y-axis) for each test. Since each score is separate, the graph consists of distinct units.

  • Sketch a graph for the situation. Tell whether the graph is continuous or discrete.Check It Out! Example 2bHenry begins to drain a water tank by opening a valve. Then he opens another valve. Then he closes the first valve. He leaves the second valve open until the tank is empty. As time passes while draining the tank (moving left to right along the x-axis) the water level (y-axis) does the following: initially declines decline more rapidly and then the decline slows down.The graph is continuous.

  • Both graphs show a relationship about a child going down a slide. Graph A represents the childs distance from the ground related to time. Graph B represents the childs Speed related to time.

  • Example 3: Writing Situations for GraphsWrite a possible situation for the given graph.A car approaching traffic slows down, drives at a constant speed, and then slows down until coming to a complete stop.Step 1 Identify labels. x-axis: time y-axis: speedStep 2 Analyze sections. over time, the speed: initially declines, remains constant, and then declines to zero.Possible Situation:

  • Check It Out! Example 3Write a possible situation for the given graphPossible Situation: When the number of students reaches a certain point, the number of pizzas bought increases.Step 1 Identify labels. x-axis: students y-axis: pizzasStep 2 Analyze sections. As students increase, the pizzas do the following: initially remains constant, and then increases to a new constant.

  • Lesson Quiz: Part I1. Write a possible situation for the given graph.Possible Situation: The level of water in a bucket stays constant. A steady rain raises the level. The rain slows down. Someone dumps the bucket.

  • 2. A pet store is selling puppies for $50 each. It has 8 puppies to sell. Sketch a graph for this situation.Lesson Quiz: Part II

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