Adviser NITI Aayog ... 4000 BCM Water Resource potential available 1869 BCM Potential that can be...

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Transcript of Adviser NITI Aayog ... 4000 BCM Water Resource potential available 1869 BCM Potential that can be...

  • Recent Reforms In Water Management Sector In

    India Avinash Mishra

    Adviser

    NITI Aayog

    27th September 2019

  • Annual Precipitation including snowfall

    4000 BCM

    Water Resource potential available

    1869 BCM

    Potential that can be put to beneficial use

    1137 BCM • 690 BCM

    (Surface water) • 447 BCM

    (Ground water)

    Present water use 710 BCM of which 555 BCM is for irrigation

    Expected demand of water by 2025

    843 BCM

    Demand of water in 2050

    1180 BCM

    Scenario of Water Resources in India

    Year Water availability(in m3)

    1947 6008

    1953 5000

    1991 2200

    2001 1829

    2025 1340

    2050 1140

    1. Water availability

  • Per Capita Storage Availability in various Countries

    Country Per capita availability in m3

    Russia 6103.70

    Australia 4733.65

    Brazil 3145.08

    USA 1964.07

    Turkey 1739.38

    Spain 1410.10

    Mexico 1245.39

    China 1111.82

    South Africa 753.65

    India 262.95 3

    Country Industrial water productivity

    (US$/cubic meter)

    Argentina 30.00

    Brazil 23.40

    India 7.50

    South Korea 95.60

    Norway 35.00

    Sweden 92.2

    Thailand 48.9

    Industrial efficiency: Cross Country Scenario

  • Major Challenges

    Poor Water Use Efficiency (WUE) India WP: 1.9 (USD/m3)

    Country WUE (USD/m3)

    Algeria 15.5

    Angola 108.7

    Brazil 21.2

    China 16.7

    Russia 10.7

    Singapore 85.0

    The UK 281.1

    Only 1/3rd of generated waste water is treated (46.2 BCM out of 140 BCM)

    Irrigation Potential Created vis-à-vis Irrigation Potential Utilized (IPC-IPU Gap): 23%

    Blocked investment due to IPC-IPU Gap: Rs. 10.3

    lakh cr. or Rs. 4.5 lakh/Ha.

    (FAO)

    Low Storage Capacity: 36% (253 BCM out of 690 BCM)

    Decadal water level decline in monitoring wells (2008-18): 52% wells

    Agriculture WUE

    0.3 USD/m3

  • Irrigation Status

    • Irrigation coverage – 68.10 million ha (48 %)

    • Irrigation through ground water - 31 %

    • Tube-wells main source of irrigation followed by canals

    • Gap between potential created and utilized - 21 %

    • Water use efficiency - 30 to 40 %

    Area in million ha

    Sector Existing

    Potential

    Potential

    Created

    Potential

    Utilized

    Major and Medium Irrigation 58.47 47.41 35.01

    Minor Irrigation 81.43 65.12 54.25

    (a) Surface Water 17.38 15.72 12.43

    (b) Ground Water 64.05 49.40 41.82

    Total 139.90 112.53 89.26

    5

  • India is currently suffering from the worst water crisis in its history

    Note: 1. Baseline water stress measures total annual water withdrawals (municipal, industrial, and agricultural) expressed as a percent of the total annual available flow for 2010; higher values indicate more competition among users Source: WRI Aqueduct; UNICEF; WaterAID, Forbes India 2015, Census 2011 According to Census 2011: out of total 24 crore households, only 7 crore households are getting treated tap water i.e 70 % households are getting contaminated water

    Baseline water stress in India

    Ratio of total withdrawals and total flow (2010)

    • 600 million people face high-to-extreme water

    stress.

    • 75% of households do not have drinking water on

    premise. 82% rural households do not have piped

    water access.

    • 70% of our water is contaminated; India is

    currently ranked 120 among 122 countries in the

    water quality index.

    Facts: Water supply is limited, quality is poor

    Data-based decision making will be a critical lever for effective water management in India

  • Rationale behind CWMI

    • Highly scattered distribution of annual precipitation

    • Loss due to evapotranspiration and topographical constraints

    • Availability of both surface and ground water varies

    • Dire need of sustainable management of water resources

    • No data centres for water related data and hence no sharing of data among the states.

    • Water Management Index for formulating strategy for States/Ministries/ Departments

    • Index will serve the purpose of tracking performance and taking corrective measures

    • CWMI has 28 Key Performance Indicators

    (KPI).

    • CWMI deals with many Department

    activities cutting across Central/ State/UT

    Governments, viz.

     Ministry of Jal Shakti

     Ministry of Rural Development

     Ministry of Agriculture

     Ministry of Panchayati Raj

     Ministry of Power

     Local Bodies

    Key Highlights

    7

  • Composite Water Management Index (CWMI)

    Objective

    • Data-backed water management and promote ‘competitive, cooperative federalism

    • Instill sense of competitive management of water resources across the States

    Data

    • An annual exercise of data collection on 28 key performance indicators under the 9 sub domain

    • Data fed by 9 to 10 departments of States into the online portal.

    First initiative of this kind

    • CWMI is the country’s first comprehensive and integrated national dataset for water and is a massive achievement in the context of India’s water management

    Two Rounds of CWMI

    • Round I of the Index was launched in June 2018.

    • CWMI 2.0

    launched in August 2019

    Objective

    • Data-backed water management and promote ‘competitive, cooperative federalism

    • Instill sense of competitive management of water resources across the States

    Data

    • An annual exercise of data collection on 28 key performance indicators under the 9 sub domain

    • Data fed by 9 to 10 departments of States into the online portal.

    First initiative of this kind

    • CWMI is the country’s first comprehensive and integrated national dataset for water and is a massive achievement in the context of India’s water management

    Two Rounds of CWMI

    Objective

    • Data-backed water management and promote ‘competitive, cooperative federalism

    • Instill sense of competitive management of water resources across the States

    Data

    • An annual exercise of data collection on 28 key performance indicators under the 9 sub domain

    • Data fed by 9 to 10 departments of States into the online portal.

    First initiative of its kind

    • CWMI is the country’s first comprehensive and integrated national dataset for water and is a massive achievement in the context of India’s water management

    Two Rounds of CWMI

    8

  • 9

    Ranking of the Non-Himalayan States over the years

  • 10 10

    Ranking of the Himalayan States over the years

  • Despite the improvement, most states need to show substantial improvements in water management practices

    Key findings

     16 out of the 27 states still score less than 50 points on the Index (out of 100), and fall in the low-performing category.

     These states collectively account for ~48% of the population, ~40% of agricultural produce, and ~35% of economic

    output of India

     Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, Odisha, Bihar, Nagaland, and Meghalaya still score less than 40 points, and the average

    improvement in low-performing category over the last three years stands at 3.1 points, lower than 5.2-point average

    improvement observed across states

     Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Kerala, and Delhi, 4 of the top 10 contributors to India’s economic output, have scores ranging

    from 20 points to 47 points

     None of the top 10 agricultural producers in India, except Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh, score more than 60 points on the

    CWMI

     This is concerning given that assessment on almost half of the Index scores is directly linked to water management in

    agriculture

    11 11

  • Jal Jeevan Mission

    Status: 18% rural households with piped water supply by March 2019 (Source: DDWS)

    Objective: All village households should have access to adequate water supply free from bacteriological and chemical contamination within the premises or supply line is within 10 meters distance from the premises boundary Target: (i) Adequate water supply = 55 lpcd (current supply: 40 lpcd) (ii) Every project village to have integrated water management which includes rain water harvesting and waste water management for reuse and recharge Central share: 1.8 lakh crore out of total investment of 3.6 lakh crore

  • Jal Shakti Abhiyaan (JSA)

    Objective: To make water conservation a Jan Andolan through asset creation and communication campaign in 1592 water stressed blocks in 256 districts Phases: The JSA runs in two Phases: Phase 1 from 1st July to 15th September 2019 for all States and Union Territories; and Phase 2 from 1st October to