Advanced Placement (AP) Biology Biology... AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology...

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  • Advanced Placement (AP)

    Biology Grades 11-12

    Dr. Christina Hughes, Science Curriculum Coordinator

    Approved by the Hazelwood School District Board of Education on June 19, 2018

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  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    AP Biology

    Hazelwood School District Mission Statement………………………………………………………………. 3

    Hazelwood School District Vision Statement…………………………………………………………………. 3

    Hazelwood School District Goals…………………………………………………………………………………... 3

    Course Overview………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

    2

  • Hazelwood School District

    Mission Statement We are a collaborative learning community guided by a relentless focus to ensure each student

    achieves maximum growth

    Vision Statement HSD will foster lifelong learners, productive citizens, and responsible leaders for an ever-

    evolving society.

    Board of Education on January 5, 2010

    Goals Goal #1: Hazelwood students will meet or exceed state standards in all curricular area with

    emphasis in reading, writing, mathematics, science and social studies.

    Goal #2: Hazelwood staff will acquire and apply skills necessary for improving student

    achievement.

    Goal #3: Hazelwood School District, the community, and all families will support the learning of

    all children.

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  • Curriculum Overview

    AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students cultivate their

    understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following

    topics: evolution, cellular processes — energy and communication, genetics, information

    transfer, ecology, and interactions.

    The revised AP® Biology course addresses this challenge by shifting from a traditional “content

    coverage” model of instruction to one that focuses on enduring, conceptual understandings

    and the content that supports them. This approach will enable students to spend less time on

    factual recall and more time on inquiry-based learning of essential concepts, and will help them

    develop the reasoning skills necessary to engage in the science practices used throughout their

    study of AP Biology.

    To foster this deeper level of learning, the breadth of content coverage in AP Biology is defined

    in a way that distinguishes content essential to support the enduring understandings from the

    many examples or applications that can overburden the course. Illustrative examples are

    provided that offer teachers a variety of optional instructional contexts to help their students

    achieve deeper understanding. Additionally, content that is outside the scope of the course and

    exam is also identified.

    Students who take an AP Biology course using this curriculum framework as its foundation will

    also develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data,

    analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across

    domains. The result will be readiness for the study of advanced topics in subsequent college

    courses — a goal of every AP course.

    The revised AP Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology

    course and has been endorsed enthusiastically by higher education officials. The prerequisites

    for AP Biology are high school courses in biology and chemistry.

    Twenty-five percent of instructional time is devoted to hands-on laboratory work with an

    emphasis on inquiry-based investigations. Investigations require students to ask questions,

    make observations and predictions, design experiments, analyze data, and construct arguments

    in a collaborative setting, where they direct and monitor their progress.

    Hands-on laboratory work will emphasize inquiry based investigations that provide students

    with opportunities to apply the science practices.

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  • The course is based on four Big Ideas, which encompass core scientific principles, theories, and

    processes that cut across traditional boundaries and provide a broad way of thinking about

    living organisms and biological systems. The following are the Big Ideas:

    • Big Idea 1: Evolution

    • Big Idea 2: Cellular Processes

    • Big Idea 3: Cell Cycle, Mitosis, and Meiosis

    • Big Idea 4: Ecology

    Taken from AP Central

    https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/pdf/ap-biology-course-and-exam-

    description.pdf?course=ap-biology

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    https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/pdf/ap-biology-course-and-exam-description.pdf?course=ap-biology https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/pdf/ap-biology-course-and-exam-description.pdf?course=ap-biology

  • COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement (AP) Biology

    GRADE LEVEL: 11-12

    CONTENT AREA: Science

    Course Description:

    Students will study the scientific method, biochemistry, and cell structure and function from a standpoint of application to scientific research. The scientific method of problem solving, laboratory experience, essay writing, and independent projects will be emphasized. This course is designed to prepare students for the Biology Advanced Placement exam. During the second semester, students will study cell processes, reproduction and development, and heredity from a standpoint of application to scientific research. Methods of problem solving, laboratory experience, essay writing, and independent projects will be emphasized. Students taking this course are strongly encouraged to take the Advanced Placement exam. Students taking the Advanced Placement exam may receive college credit if they receive a qualifying score.

    Course Rationale:

    The Advanced Placement Program enables willing and academically prepared students to pursue college-level studies - with the opportunity to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both - while still in high school. AP Biology uses scientific inquiry for investigation throughout the course. This requires students to reason scientifically about scientific principles, theories and processes in order to establish their own understanding of relevant biological information.

    Course Scope and Sequence

    Big Idea 1: Evolution 10 weeks

    Big Idea 2: Cellular Processes –Energy and Communication 8 weeks

    Big Idea 3: The Cell Cycle, Mitosis, and Meiosis 10 weeks

    Big Idea 4: Ecology 10 weeks

    6

  • Approved Course Materials and Resources:

    Urry, L., Cain, M., Wasserman, S., Minorsky, P., Reece, J. (2018). Campbell: Biology in Focus. Pearson, 11th Edition.

    Essential Terminology/Vocabulary

    Big Idea 1: Evolution adaptation, adaptive radiation, allele, allopatric, analogous structure, Ancestor, artificial selection, background extinction rate, biogeography, biological species, cladogenesis, coevolution, common ancestor, comparative anatomy, convergent evolution, Darwin, differential survival, directional selection, disruptive selection, divergent evolution, endosymbiosis, epoch, evo-devo, evolution, evolutionary fitness, extinction, fixation (of alleles), fossil, fossil record, founder effect, gene flow, gene pool, genetic bottleneck, genetic drift, genetic equilibrium, genetic variation, genotype, geologic time scale, geology, gradualism (aka anagenesis), Hardy-Weinberg equation, homologous structures, homology, hybrid, Last Universal Common, mass extinction, migration, Miller- Urey experiments, modern synthesis, molecular clock, mutation, natural selection, paleontology, panspermia, parallel evolution, phenotype, phylogeny, polymorphism, polyploidy, population, postzygotic isolating mechanism, prezygotic isolating mechanism, primordial environment, radiometric dating, random mating, relative dating, reproductive isolation, RNA world, rock strata, speciation, species, stromatolite, sympatric, transitional fossil, and vestigial organ.

    Big Idea 2: Cellular Processes: Energy & Communication absorption spectrum, accessory pigment, acetyl coA, action spectrum, activation energy, active site, allosteric regulation, anabolism, anaerobic metabolism, ATP, autotroph, Calvin cycle, catabolism, catalyst, cellular respiration, chemiosmosis, chemoautotroph, chlorophyll, chloroplast, citric acid cycle, coenzyme, cofactor, compartmentalization, consumer, cyclic electron flow, denaturation, electron transport chain, endergonic reaction, entropy, enzyme, exergonic reaction, feedback inhibition, fermentation, glycolysis, heterotroph, induced fit model, light dependent reactions, light independent reactions, metabolic pathway, mitochondrion, NAD, NADP, negative feedback, non-cyclic electron flow, oxidative phosphorylation, photolysis, photosynthesis, positive feedback, ribulose bisphosphate, substrate-level phosphorylation, and thylakoid membrane.

    Big Idea 3: The Cell Cycle, Mitosis, and Meiosis activator, allele, amino acids, anaphase, anticodon, autosome, back cross, base-pairing rules, cancer, cell cycle, cell differentiation, cell division, cellular differentiation, centrio