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Transcript of Action Plan for Lupus Research - Amazon S3 · PDF file lupus patients are living five years...

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    National Institutes of Health

    Action Plan for Lupus Research

    Prepared by the National Institute of Arthritis and

    Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

    12-22-2015

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    Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 4

    Chapter 1: Etiology and Prevention ................................................................................................ 7

    Genetics and Genomics ........................................................................................................... 8

    Environment ............................................................................................................................ 8

    Epidemiology ........................................................................................................................... 9

    Chapter 2: Mechanisms of Disease ................................................................................................. 9

    Immune and Inflammatory Mechanisms .............................................................................. 10

    Target Organ Damage ............................................................................................................ 12

    Chapter 3: New Treatments and Interventions ............................................................................ 12

    Biomarker Development and Validation ............................................................................... 13

    Drug Development ................................................................................................................ 13

    Clinical Trials .......................................................................................................................... 14

    Patient-Centered Research Opportunities ............................................................................ 14

    Chapter 4: Diagnosis and Clinical Care ......................................................................................... 15

    Biomarkers Usage in Clinical Practice .................................................................................... 15

    Clinical Monitoring and Treatment ....................................................................................... 16

    Chapter 5: Behavioral, Biopsychosocial and Health Services Research ....................................... 17

    Behavioral Research .............................................................................................................. 17

    Biopsychosocial research ....................................................................................................... 18

    Health Services Research ....................................................................................................... 18

    Chapter 6: Special Populations ..................................................................................................... 18

    Health Disparities .................................................................................................................. 20

    Lupus and Pregnancy ............................................................................................................. 20

    Childhood-Onset Lupus ......................................................................................................... 20

    Lupus Across the Lifespan ..................................................................................................... 20

    Chapter 7: Training and Collaborations ........................................................................................ 21

    Training .................................................................................................................................. 21

    Collaborations ........................................................................................................................ 22

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    Conclusion ..................................................................................................................................... 22

    Appendix 1: Overview of the Development Process .................................................................... 23

    Appendix 2: Requests for Information Published in the NIH Guide For Grants and Contracts ... 25

    Appendix 3: Webinar Participants ................................................................................................ 35

    Appendix 4: Staff Acknowledgements .......................................................................................... 41

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    Action Plan for Lupus Research

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus) is one of more than 80 known autoimmune

    diseases. An autoimmune disease is one in which the body's immune system—its normal

    defense against harmful invaders including viruses and bacteria—turns its attack against the

    body's own organs, tissues, and cells. In some autoimmune diseases, the target of the attack is

    limited to a particular part of the body—the blood vessels, moisture-producing glands of the

    eyes and mouth, or insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, for example. In lupus, the attack is

    systemic, meaning it affects many organs and organ systems including the skin, joints, heart,

    lungs, kidneys, and brain. The results can be disabling or even deadly.

    Disease activity often waxes and wanes. Periods of relatively mild disease may be followed by

    flares, or periods of increased disease activity involving one or more organ systems, which can

    lead to irreversible organ damage. Some flares are evident through clinical symptoms such as a

    skin rash, increased fatigue, joint inflammation, oral or nasal ulcers, or seizures. In other cases,

    the only evidence of a flare is a laboratory test showing a low white blood cell or platelet count

    or protein in the urine, for example.

    By the most conservative estimates, there are at least 322,000 Americans with definite or

    probable lupus.1 Recent independent surveys have suggested a prevalence as high as 1.5

    million.1 Women with the disease outnumber men nine to one. Lupus often strikes women in

    their early working and childbearing years, interfering with the ability to work, have or raise a

    family, or in some cases, even care for themselves.

    The most heterogeneous of the autoimmune diseases, lupus is also one of the most difficult to

    understand and treat. Sixty years ago, about 50 percent of those with lupus died within five

    years of their diagnosis. Today, thanks to advances brought about by research, 97 percent of

    lupus patients are living five years after diagnosis, and 90 percent continue to survive after 10

    years. The transformation of lupus from a disease with a high mortality rate to one that is

    chronic has led to an increased need for better therapies that can manage long-term

    symptoms. Ongoing research is likely to lead to new therapies with fewer side effects.

    1 http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/lupus.htm

    http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/lupus.htm

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    The past two decades of research have yielded a wealth of new information and extraordinary

    growth in improving our understanding of lupus. As a result, opportunities now exist to identify

    potential genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and infectious causes of lupus, and to develop

    novel approaches for lupus treatment and prevention. To achieve these goals, the National

    Institutes of Health (NIH) places a high priority on cross-disciplinary research and the

    participation of other government agencies and private organizations in these efforts.

    To facilitate collaboration among the NIH Institutes, other federal agencies, voluntary and

    professional organizations, and industry groups that have an interest in lupus, the NIH

    established the Lupus Federal Working Group (LFWG) in 2003 at the request of Congress. The

    LFWG is led by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

    (NIAMS), and includes representatives from all relevant Department of Health and Human

    Services (HHS) agencies and other federal departments having an interest in lupus. This includes

    the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; the National Institute of Neurological

    Disorders and Stroke; the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; the

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health; and

    other agencies of the federal government, including the HHS Office on Women’s Health, the

    U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    (CDC). Voluntary organizations and representatives from the private sector also attend and

    participate in the meetings of the LFWG.

    In fiscal year 2005, the House Appropriations Committee directed the NIH to develop a plan to

    guide the nation's investment in lupus research. To identify the opportunities, priorities and

    needs in lupus research that should be considered for inclusion in the plan, the NIH convened a

    workshop with scientific experts. The high