A School Counselor’s Role in Reducing Homophobic Victimization

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    23-Feb-2016
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    34
  • download

    1

Embed Size (px)

description

A School Counselor’s Role in Reducing Homophobic Victimization. Holly Shepherd M.Ed Counselo r Education ‘14 , University of Virginia. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of A School Counselor’s Role in Reducing Homophobic Victimization

A School Counselors Role in Reducing Homophobic Victimization

A School Counselors Role in Reducing Homophobic VictimizationHolly Shepherd

M.Ed Counselor Education 14,University of Virginia

By raising the level of conversation regarding issues of sexual orientation and implementing supports for LGBT students at multiple levels, school counselors can shepherd their schools toward meaningful and responsible change and their students toward further acceptance and opportunity. (Depaul, Walsh, & Dam, 2009)

Current News2011: United Nations Human Rights Council approves resolution to include LGBT youth in International Human Rights Law5/2012: Bill 13 in Ontario; requires schools to allow students to form GSA in public and Catholic schools8/2012: Anti-Bullying Yardstick Policy discourages schools from addressing bullying based on specific characteristics9/2012: The School Board of Broward County, Florida is the first to support LGBT history month; 6th largest school district in country9/2012: Intel stopped donating money to Boy Scouts because of anti-gay policy10/2012: California governor passes bill banning reparative therapy for minors11/2012: Celina High School, Ohio students forced to remove pro-gay t-shirts11/2012: Jamaican University; 2 gay men attacked11/15/2012: Anti-gay attack on UVA student on campus

School Climate Survey (1999-2009)Sexual orientation: 84.6% verbally harassed; 40.1% physically harassed; 18.8% physically assaultedGender expression: 63.7% verbally harassed; 27.2% physically harassed; 12.5% physically assaulted72.4% heard homophobic remarks (i.e. faggot, dyke)61.1% felt unsafe29.1% LGBT students missed class because of safety concerns (compared to 8.0% secondary school students)30% LGBT students missed whole days because of safety concerns (compared to 6.7% secondary school students)GPA of LGBT students who were frequently harassed was half a grade lower than students less often harassedIncreased levels of victimization correlated with increased levels of depression and anxiety and decreased levels of self-esteem96% LGBT students who missed school related to higher levels of victimization, but higher levels of psychological well-being44.6% reported having a Gay-Straight Alliance at school

LGBT Student ExperienceSchool Climate Survey, ContinuedSchool Climate Over TimeDecline of hearing homophobic remarks from 2005-2009Experiences of harassment remained constantDecline in harassment from 2007-2009Increase of LGBT-related resources available

Reported Positive Interventions and SupportGay-Straight AllianceSupportive StaffAnti-bullying policy based on sexual orientation

Victimized LGBT Students ExperienceLoss of self-esteem and confidenceSocial isolation

Withdrawal

Inability to concentrate

Nonattendance

School-phobia

Feelings of guilt and shame

Substance abuse

Suicidal ideation and behaviors

Lower levels of academic achievement

Self-harming tendencies

Harassment

Fear of peer and parent rejection

Timidity

Social dissatisfaction

Depression and anxietyStrategies for Social Justice ChangePolitical savvy: knowing how and when to interveneRaising consciousnessInitiating difficult dialoguesBuilding intentional relationship: forming positive working relationships with others in their school communitiesTeaching students self-advocacy skillsUse data for marketingEducating others about school counselors role as advocateLGBT students who can identify a supportive staff member are more likely to feel safe and achieve academic success

The ASCA Model: Delivery System School counselors have been educated and trained to be advocates, leaders, collaborators, and consultants who create opportunities for equity in access and success (ASCA)

Indirect Student ServicesInstitutional level

Administration and management of school counseling program to include LGBT issuesStrategic, long-term planning

Include sexual orientation in nondiscriminatory policy (i.e. Safe Schools Policy)

Indirect Services, ContinuedAdvocate for modification in higher education curriculumProfessionals experience lack of preparation to work with LGBT populationEducate teachers and school administration about LGBT issuesConduct continuing education workshopsCommunity OutreachConsultation and collaboration with stakeholdersPartner with community agenciesCan provide expertise, training, and professional development

Direct Student ServicesTargeted PreventionSeeks to prevent chronic and predictable risks caused by various factorsCreate structured developmental lessons: introduce resources and skill building activities to support LGBT youthConduct psychoeducation with students, families, and caregiversHold parent meetings Teach history of social and cultural understandings of sexual orientationFocus on cultural strengths

Ally 101 WorkshopTo provide understanding about what an Ally is To increase belief of why Allies are important To encourage effective Ally behavior Ally: (n.) An ally is a member of a privileged group who takes a stand against oppression. An ally works to be a part of social change rather than being part of the oppression.

Where do you stand as an Ally?STEP INTO THE CIRCLE IF YOU HAVE HEARD PEOPLE SAY THATS SO GAY OR NO HOMO IN SCHOOL. YOUVE HEARD PEOPLE MAKE NEGATIVE COMMENTS ABOUT SOMEONES GENDER AT SCHOOL, BEING CALLED A SISSY, BEING TOLD TO STOP ACTING TOO MUCH LIKE A BOY, ETC. STEP INTO THE CIRCLE IF YOU DONT FEEL YOU CAN BE OPEN ABOUT YOUR SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND/OR GENDER IDENTITY OR EXPRESSION AT SCHOOL WITHOUT THE THREAT OF BEING BULLIED OR HARASSED. STEP INTO THE CIRCLE IF YOU HAVE BEEN HARASSED BECAUSE OF YOUR SEXUAL ORIENTATION OR GENDER IDENTITY. STEP INTO THE CIRCLE IF YOU DONT FEEL YOU CAN BE OPEN ABOUT YOUR SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND/OR GENDER IDENTITY OR EXPRESSION AT SCHOOL WITHOUT THE THREAT OF BEING BULLIED OR HARRASSED. STEP INTO THE CIRCLE IF SOMEONE YOU KNOW HAS BEEN HARASSED BECAUSE OF THEIR SEXUAL ORIENTATION OR GENDER IDENTITY. www.allyweek.org

Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA)School counselors can provide support and guidance to teachers and students as they seek to form alliances. They can help promote dialogue.http://youtu.be/VMWCSTh6nIU?hd=1

Tips for starting a GSA at your school!

Crisis InterventionApplying person-centered techniques to LGBT youthSelf-directed client growth through a discovery processSchool counselor creates a safe environmentCongruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathyModifications to traditional approachAddress social and cultural influencesSupport groups/figuresBack-To-School GuideDisplay LGBT-inclusive materialsIncorporate LGBT materials into curriculumTeach about RESPECTSupport LGBT student clubsParticipate in Day of Silence, Ally Week, No Name-Calling week, etc.START TALKINGwww.glsen.orgResources for School CounselorsGslen.orgYouthallies.comThinkb4youspeak.comSafeschoolscoalition.orgGsanetwork.orgMatthewshepard.org

Apa.orgCampuspride.orgLgbtcenters.orgPointfoundation.orgThetrevorproject.org

ReferencesAdams, N., Cox, T., & Dunstan, L. (2004). I am the hate that dare not speak its name: Dealing with homophobia in secondary schools. Educational Psychology in Practice. 20(3), 259-269. doi: 10.1080/0266736042000251826DePaul, J., Walsh, M., & Dam, U. (2009). The role of school counselors in addressing sexual orientation in school. Professional School Counseling, 12(4), 300-308.Espelage, D., Aragon, S. R., Birkett, M., & Koenig, B. W. (2008). Homophobic teasing, psychological outcomes, and sexual orientation among high school students: What influence do parents and schools have? School Psychology Review. 37(2), 202-216.Goodrich, K. M. & Luke, M. (2009). LGBTQ responsive school counseling. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling. 3, 113-127. doi: 10.1080/15538600903005284Graybill, E. C., Varjas, K., Meyers, J., & Watson, L. B. (2009). Content-specific strategies to advocate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth: An exploratory study. School Psychology Review. 38(4), 570-584.Luke, M., Goodrich, K. M, & Scarborough, J. L. (2011). Integration of the K-12 LGBTQI student population in counselor education curricula: The current state of affairs. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling. 5(2), 80-101. doi: 10.1080/15538605.2011.574530Moe, J. L., Leggett, E. S., & Perera-Diltz, D. (2011). School counseling for systemic change: Bullying and suicide prevention for LGBTQ youth. Ideas and Research You Can Use: VISTAS 2011, 81. 1-11. Poteat, V. P., Mereish, E. H., DiGiovanni, C. D., & Koenig, B. W. (2011). The effects of general and homophobic victimization on adolescents psychosocial and educational concerns: The importance of intersecting identities and parent support. Journal of Counseling Psychology. 58(4), 597-609. doi: 10.1037/a0025095Robinson, K. (2010). A study of young lesbian and gay peoples school experiences. Educational Psychlogy in Practice. 26(4), 331-351. doi: 10.1080/02667363.2010.521308Singh, A., Urbano, A., Haston, M., & McMahon, E. (2010). School counselors strategies for social justice change: A grounded theory of what works in the real world. Professional School Counseling. 13(3), 135-145.Valenti, M. & Campbell, R. (2009). Working with youth on LGBT issues: Why gay-straight alliance advisors become involved. Journal of Community Psychology. 37(2), 228-248. doi: 10.1002/jcop.20290Williams, T., Connolly, J., Pepler, D., & Craig, W. (2005). Peer victimization, social support, and psychosocial adjustment of sexual minority adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 34(5), 471-482. doi: 10.1007/s10964-005-7264-x