2015 McKnight Summer Research & Writing 2015 McKnight Summer Research & Writing Institute...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    27-Jun-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    1
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of 2015 McKnight Summer Research & Writing 2015 McKnight Summer Research & Writing Institute...

  • 2015 McKnight Summer Research & Writing

    Institute Essentials for Dissertation Research

    & Writing in the Social and Behavioral Sciences

    July 29, 30 & 31, 2015

    Marvin P. Dawkins, PhD Professor of Sociology

    University of Miami

  • Goals and Objectives

    ► The overall goal of these workshops is to assist participants in making tangible progress toward completion of the PhD dissertation.

    ► The specific objectives are as follows: 1. to acquire and advance knowledge about the

    dissertation process;

    2. to gain an understanding of the structure of the dissertation and the skills needed to be successful in completing dissertation research and writing;

    3. to sharpen skills by engaging in exercises related to dissertation research and writing and by actually working on one’s own dissertation; and

    4. to facilitate workshop follow-up meetings (one-on- one) with the workshop leader and other persons experienced in directing dissertation research.

  • Structure of the Workshops

    The workshops are structured to provide an opportunity for interaction and feedback. Therefore, workshop participants are expected to ask questions, make observations and participate in feedback exercises. Responses given in feedback exercises will be discussed in one-on-one follow-up meetings with the workshop leader.

  • Delimiters

    ►These workshops are not intended to be a substitute or challenge to the guidance you receive from your dissertation chair and/or other committee members (or to serve as a forum for “bashing” your committee);

    ►The workshops are based on the assumption that completion of the dissertation is the beginning rather than the end of your development as a researcher or academic scholar;

    ►Thus, the workshops are also intended to assist participants in making the transition from graduate school to a position in an academic institution, postdoctoral research setting or other appropriate positions in your field.

  • Content Covered in Each Workshop 2015 ► Workshop I: July 29, 1:30-4:30pm

    � Understanding the dissertation process;

    � Preparing for dissertation research: From proposal to dissertation;

    � Standard dissertation chapters (& alternative dissertation formats);

    � Developing & writing chapters 1, 2, & 3: Some strategies for your introduction, literature review, theoretical considerations and research methodology.

    ► Workshop II: July 30, 9:00am-12:00pm � Developing & writing chapters 1, 2, & 3 (continued);

    � Developing and writing chapters 4 & 5: Some strategies for presenting/reporting results and drawing conclusions.

    ► Workshop III: July 31, 9:00am-12:00pm � Completing the full draft and submitting the revised full draft of the

    dissertation to your committee in preparation for the defense;

    � Preparing for the dissertation defense: What actually occurs at a defense;

    � Completing post-defense revisions of the dissertation and submitting the final dissertation to the Graduate School.

  • Wednesday, 7/29/15 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

    Workshop I: � Understanding the dissertation process;

    � Preparing for dissertation research: From proposal to dissertation (& alternative dissertation formats);

    � Standard dissertation chapters;

    � Developing & writing chapters 1, 2, & 3: Some strategies for your introduction, literature review, theoretical considerations and research methodology.

  • Pre-dissertation Phase Dissertation Phase Post-dissertation Phase

    Selection of Chair and Committee

    Development of Proposal

    Research Writing Completion

    Working with dissertation chair and committee

    Defense

    Post-defense revisions

    Submission of dissertation to the Graduate School

    THE DISSERTATION PROCESSS

  • Preparing for dissertation research: Essential aids

    ►A good computer;

    ►Aids to good writing (e.g., style, transitions, quotations, plagiarism, avoiding plagiarism, and writing clear, concise, and direct sentences);

    ►Access to a good dictionary (hard copy or online) ;

    ►Aids to style guides (e.g., APA, CMS, ASA); � e.g., The Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab)

    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/

  • Preparing for Dissertation Research: From Proposal To Dissertation

    Proposal Completed Dissertation

    ►After successfully writing the PhD dissertation proposal, how does one successfully write the dissertation?

  • FROM PROPOSAL TO DISSERTATION

    Proposal Completed Dissertation

    Dissertation Research

    ► Writing the dissertation involves:

    1. completing the proposed research (conducting the analysis, obtaining and reporting results, and drawing conclusions), while

    2. using the proposal to further develop and complete dissertation chapters.

  • Structure of the PhD Proposal The proposal document has separate sections and your department may provide guidelines

    specifying content and suggested length of each section. A typical proposal will include the following (suggested lengths in parentheses:

    1. Problem Statement & Research Questions (1-3 pages) (problem to be investigated; purpose of the study; specific research questions)

    2. Significance of the Problem (1-2 page) (discussion of why the problem is important and how proposed study will fill need for knowledge)

    3. Related Literature Review & Conceptual Framework (6-12 pages) (review of previous research; identification of theories, concepts and research that provide the best framework to study the problem; hypotheses to be tested)

    4. Methods (6-10 pages) (sample; sources of data; data collection procedures; measurement or operational

    definitions of variables; instrumentation; study design)

    5. Data Analysis (1-2 pages) (plan for analysis of data; statistical techniques to be employed)

    6. Limitations and Implications (1 page) (study limitations; expected contribution to knowledge, theory, policy, or practice)

  • FEEDBACK EXERCISE

    ►Can you describe your proposed dissertation in 150 words?

    ►Please take a few minutes to do this.

  • Structure of the Dissertation: Standard Dissertation Chapters

    ► While the proposal is usually organized into sections, the dissertation is always organized into chapters.

    ► The dissertation typically includes the following (standard) chapters:

    1. INTRODUCTION

    2. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE*

    3. METHODOLOGY

    4. RESULTS

    5. CONCLUSIONS

    *Theory/theoretical framework may be included or treated as a separate chapter

  • CONNECTING THE DETAILED PROPOSAL TO CHAPTERS I, II, & III OF THE

    DISSERTATION

    ►The detailed dissertation proposal (30+ pages) can be more readily expanded into dissertation chapters 1, 2, & 3.

    ►Therefore, after successfully completing a sound proposal, writing of chapters 1, 2, and 3 can begin immediately, while simultaneously carrying out the research (e.g., data collection, experimentation, data analysis, etc.) needed to complete chapters 4 and 5.

  • DEVELOPING AND WRITING CHAPTER I: A CHECKLIST OF TYPICAL CONTENT*

    CHAPTER I: Introduction and Problem Statement

    Chapter overview � Introduction � Background of the problem � Statement of the problem � Purpose of the study � Research questions � Importance of the study � Scope and delimitations of the study Outline of other dissertation chapters

    *Adapted from: Isaac, Stephen and Michael B. Williams. 1980. Handbook in Research and Evaluation. San Diego: Edits Publishers.

  • DEVELOPING AND WRITING CHAPTER II: A CHECKLIST OF TYPICAL CONTENT

    CHAPTER II: Review of Related Literature

    Chapter overview

    � Historical background (if necessary)

    � Review of existing studies (what has been found; who has done work; when and where latest studies were completed; what methodological and analytical approaches were followed?)

    � Arrangement of literature review in terms of historical chronology, questions considered, purposes, qualitative/quantitative approaches, or other logical ordering

    � Summary of literature reviewed

    � Establish need for additional research (to address gaps, inconsistent findings or absence of research altogether)

    � Delineation of various theoretical positions or conceptual frameworks as a basis for generation of hypotheses to be tested

    Chapter summary

  • DEVELOPING AND WRITING CHAPTER III: A CHECKLIST OF TYPICAL CONTENTS

    CHAPTER III: Methodology

    Chapter overview � Description of methodological approach/design (e.g.

    experimental, quasi-experimental, survey, etc.) � Specification of dependent, independent, & control variables in

    the context of the design employed � Description of data and data collection procedures � Instrumentation � Operational definition of variables � Possible restatement of research/theoretical hypotheses in

    operational form relative to instrumentation or procedures to be followed in hypothesis testing

    � Methodological limitations Chapter summar