1.9.3.G1 © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised March 2009 –...

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Transcript of 1.9.3.G1 © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised March 2009 –...

  • Slide 1
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Renting vs. Owning Family Economics and Financial Education Take Charge of your Finances
  • Slide 2
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Introduction Housing is the largest personal expenditure. About 1/3 of a persons income. Choosing where to live is based upon a persons goals, values, needs, and wants. Places to live include: House, apartment, condo, mobile home, etc.
  • Slide 3
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Reasons for making a housing choice Personal and financial goals Personal values, needs, and wants Amount of money available for housing costs Financial resources and readiness Credit history Real estate prices Location preference Expected length of stay in particular place
  • Slide 4
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Costs of renting Monthly rent Security deposit Utilities electricity, water, garbage, etc. Renters insurance
  • Slide 5
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Renting A lease is a legal contract between the tenant and the landlord, specifying the responsibilities and rights of both parties. Identifies the rent amount, security deposit amount and specifications, payment for utility bills, late payment penalties, length of lease, eviction terms, etc. This is between the landlord and the tenant Landlord Owner of the rental property. May perform management duties or hire a property manager. Property manager - may charge a fee to the landlord to perform the management task Duties may include: May collect rent and deposits, pay utility bills, complete repairs and maintenance, watch over the property, respond to tenant complaints, assign new tenants, etc.
  • Slide 6
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Renting continued Tenant (renter) The person who rents the property. Renters are generally People who choose not to own a home. People who cannot afford to own a home. The tenant pays rent to the landlord which allows them to live in the rental property. Rent The cost of using someone elses property.
  • Slide 7
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Moving into a rental Upon moving into a new place, people are usually required to pay a security deposit and sign a lease. Security deposit An advance payment to cover anything beyond normal wear and tear on the unit.
  • Slide 8
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Advantages of renting Low move-in costs Fixed monthly expenses Easy to move Location choices (may be close to work or school) Less maintenance and repair work Fewer responsibilities May offer extra amenities such as a tennis court or pool Typically less expensive than home ownership May be able to save for other wants or needs if renting a less expensive apartment Other expenses may be included in rent payment such as electricity, water, sewer, and/or garbage
  • Slide 9
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Disadvantages of renting Subject to terms of a lease Rent may change with little notice Less privacy and transient neighbors. Restrictions on noise level, pets, etc. Fewer opportunities to upgrade apartment such as new carpet, paint, or wallpaper. When leaving a property, no equity is returned as it would be if selling a home. No tax deductions May lose rental if the property is sold.
  • Slide 10
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Costs of ownership Monthly mortgage payments Down payment (one time cost) Closing costs (one time cost) Utilities electricity, water, garbage, etc. Homeowners insurance Real estate property taxes Maintenance
  • Slide 11
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Home ownership Home ownership - the buyer has purchased a housing unit as property Goal of many Americans A large financial decision Owning a home is an investment because if a person sells a home for more than what it was bought for, the person makes money. Financial planning and savings can assist a person in planning for the benefits of home ownership later in life.
  • Slide 12
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Purchasing a home 90% of buyers take out a mortgage Mortgage-loan to purchase real-estate Generally can last 15-30 years Monthly payments include principal and interest, is an escrow account will include property insurance and property tax Escrow account-also called a reserve account, is a fund where money is held by a financial institution to pay amounts that will come due during the year. Fixed-rate mortgage & Adjustable-rate mortgage (changes with rates) Balloon payments-mortgages Collateral is an item promised to the lender if the borrower does not pay back the loan, usually the home. Down payment Amount of money paid on the home at time of purchase Typically 10 20% (They want 20%) of the purchase price of the home Recommended purchase price amount an individual should pay for a home 2 times their annual household income
  • Slide 13
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Mortages Graduated payment Payments start low and go up for a person whose imcome will increase Balloon Fixed monthly payments plus one large payment, usually after 3,5, or 7 years. Growing equity Payment increases to allow loan to be paid off more quickly Shared appreciation Borrower agrees to share appreciated value of the home with lender
  • Slide 14
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Refinancing Replacing an existing debt obligation with another debt obligation under different terms. Commonly for the purpose of going from a high APR to a lower APR. Fixed APR that is high and the rate in the market is lower Or switching from a variable rate to a fixed-rate loan May have a penalty clause or having to pay closing fees Transactions fees Some refinance to extend the term of the loan at the same interest rate Leads to paying more down the road
  • Slide 15
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Value and Equity Equity Is the difference between the market value of property and the amount owed on it. Increases as you make payments, or as you pay off your debt. Example Purchase a home at 150,000 and have a loan of 120,000 you initial equity is 30,000
  • Slide 16
  • 1.9.3.G1 Family Economics & Financial Education Revised March 2009 Housing Unit Renting vs. Owning a Home Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Value Market value Highest value that the property will bring on the market Appraised value Examining the structure