1881 Iowa Settlers Manual - Making

download 1881 Iowa Settlers Manual - Making

of 19

  • date post

    26-Oct-2014
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    209
  • download

    13

Embed Size (px)

description

Uploaded from Google Docs

Transcript of 1881 Iowa Settlers Manual - Making

:

^

THE HOMESTEAD MANUALVALUABLE INFORMATION FOR THE PEOPLE REUTINd PRINCIPALLY

5

TO THE

H

RD?rii^PBM-^JiM^|iijsi:Mi.,c|-i-4

THIS BOOK

IS

PRESENTED TO EACH NEW SUBSCRIBER FOR THE IOWA HOMESTEAD.

CAREFULLY PREPARED FROM

THE BEST AUTHORITIES

By

B. F.

GUE,'^^^^Tj

EDIT OR

OF THE IOWA HOM^^C-^OlGHr 6 leai Sc'^DE8 MOINEB, IOWA

PUBLISHED BY THE HOMESTEAD COMP^^Y,1881.

rts

144remain half anliour.

THE HOMESTEAD MANUAL.Take weakit

lye, as

much

as will cover the yarn,

and bringair

it to

a boil; take the yarn out of the copperas-water

and

let it

one half an hour; then put

into the lye one-half hour; repeat the

process until the color

is sufl&cient;

wash well

in

hard water, then in

hard soap-suds, soak one hour, and afterward wash in hard water.Coloring Cotton Blue.

Take two pounds of copperas, one-half pound of prussiate of potash, oil of vitrol. Dissolve the copperas in enough water to cover the goods, and scald two hours. Take out the goods and rinse in cold water; then empty the kettle and put in fresh soft water, sufficient toone poundcover the goods well; add the prussiate of potash, put in the goods andboiloil

twenty minutes;

then take out the goods and to the liquor add the

of vitrol and stir well.

Put

in the

goods again and

let

them remain

until the color is as dark as is desired.

Rinse

in cold water.

Copper and Brass Kettles, Used for Dyeing, to Clean. you have been dyeing any color in your copper or brass boiler, itquently tinged with the dye used;it is oil

Afteris

fre-

therefore customary to cleanof vitriol and water, a littleit

these utensils with a small quantity offine

sand or ashes, and a coarse flannel cloth; rubbed quite dry.

must afterwards be

CEMENTS.For Fastening Blades,chalk1,

Files,

Etc.

Shellac

2 parts, preparedis filled

powdered and mixed.

The opening

of the blade

with

the powder, the lower end of the iron heated and pressed

in.

Black, for Bottles.resin

Consists of

pitch hardened by the addition of

and brick-dust.in the east for uniting jewels, glass

Cement usedin just as

and metals

Dis-

solve 5 or 6 pieces of

gum

mastic, each about the size of a large pea,

muchinwill

spirit as will render it liquid.;

Soften some isinglass by

steeping

it

water

having driedof

it,

dissolve as

much

brandy asdissolved.

makebits

a 2-ounce vial of strong glue, to

of it in good which must be

added two small

gum ammoniacum,

rubbing until they are

THE HOMESTEAD MANUAL.

145

For Aquariums.

The

following

is

tigtly recommended by a cor-

respondent of the Boston Journal of Chemistry. Take 10 parts by measure of litharge, 10 parts of plaster of Paris, 10 parts of dry whitesand, 1 part of finely powdered resin, and

mix them, when wantedoil.

for

use into a pretty

stifi"

putty with boiled linseed

This

will

stick to

wood, stone, metal, or glass, and hardens under water.for marine aquaria, asit resists

It is also

good

the action of salt water.it

It is better

not to use the tank until three days after

has been made.

For Repairing Fractured Bodies of all Kinds.ground upon a slab with linseedair,

Whiteall

lead

oil

varnish, and kept out of contact ofkinds.

affords

It

requires

cement capable of repairing fractured bodies of a few weeks to harden. When stone or iron

are t be

cemented together, a compound of equal parts of sulphur with pitchanswers very well.

Chinese.thatit will

Dissolve

shellac in

enough

rectified

spirits

to

make

a

liquid of the consistency of molasses.

This will join wood so stronglyis

even resist the continual flexion of a bow, as

often shown

in Japan, China,

and the East Indies.spears,to

Where

this composition is

used

to join

wood

for bows, and

and lances,

the

fluid is thinly

smeared over each faceThisalso used to

be united, a thin piece of muslin interposed,is

and the whole being pressed tightly together,is

left to the

next day.

mend

glass, china

and fancy ornaments.the finest powder;

For China.

Grind

some lime

into

tie

some

in a

thin piece of muslin, then wet the edges of the broken china with the

white of an egg, dust some lime on

it,

and join immediately.excellent

For Cisterns and Casks.cisterns

An

cement for rendering

and water-casks tight

is

made by incorporating thoroughly eightThis

parts of melted glue, of the consistency used by carpenters, with four parts of linseedoil,

boiled into varnish with litharge.

cementwith

hardens in about forty-eight hours, and renders the joints of woodencisterns

and casksits

air-tight

and water-tight.

A compound of glue,

one-fourth

weight of Venice turpentine, made as above, serves to

cement

glass, metal and wood to one another. Fresh-made cheese curd, and old skim-milk cheese, boiled in water to a slimy consistence, dis-

solved in a solution of bicarbonate of potash, are said to form a good

146

THE HOMESTEAD MANUAL.The gluten of wheat,well prepared,

cement for glass and porcelain.is also

a

good cement.

Whitecloth,

of eggs, with jQour and water well mixed,

and smeared over linensmall apparatus.

forms a ready lute for steam joints in

plaster

Cement, Alabaster and Plaster. Ornaments of alabaster or may be joined together by means of a little white of egg, thickfinely

ened with finely powdered quick-lime, or by a mixture of newly baked

and

powdered plaster of Paris, mixed up with the least possible

quantity of water.

Egg Cement.lime.

White of

egg thickened with finely powdered quickglass, china, marble, alabaster, spar

Use: Toetc.

mend earthenware,

ornaments,

It does not resist moisture.

GtErman Cement An excellent cement for glass or earthenware is made as follows: Take two parts gum shellac and one part Veniceturpentine; fuse together in an iron pot; and,into sticks.

when

partially cool,

form

When

wanted for use, melt near a gentle heat.

Care must

be taken, while fusing the material to keep the vessel closed, as the turpentineis

very inflammable;

or,

two parts litharge and one part each of

unslacked lime and

flint glass;oil.

pulverize separately, and mix.

To use

it

wet up with old drying

Cement to Mend Iron Pots and Pans.phur and onepart,

Take

two parts of

sul-

by weight, ofit

finefire

black lead; put the sulphur in an

old iron pan, holding

over ^he

until it begins to melt, then add the

lead; stir well until all is

mixed and melted; then pour out on an iron

plate or

smooth stone.

When

cool;

break into small pieces.the same

A

suffi-

cient quantity of this being placed

upon the crack of the iron potin

to be

mended, can be soldered with a hot ironsolders his sheets.rivet in it

way

a tinsmith

If thereit

is

a small hole in the pot, drive a copper

and then solder

over with this cement.

Cement for Leather.common

A

mixture of India rubber and shellac

varnish makes a very adhesive leather cement.isinglass, with a little

A

strong solution of

excellent cemeat for leather.

shoemakers for invisible

it, makes an The following is the compound used by repairing: To ten parts bisulphide carbon and

diluted alcohol added to

THE HOMESTEAD MANUAL.

147

one part spirits turpentine add enougli gutta percha to make a tough, The surface to be joined must be perfectly free thicklv flowing liquid,

from grease, whichpressure

is

apply a hot iron for a time.

accomplished by laying a cloth upon them and The coat is applied to both surfaces, and

made

till

the joints are dry.

Cement for Petroleum Lamps.

A

for attaching the brass works to petroleum lamps

cement particularlaly adapted is made by Puscher,

by boiling three parts resin with one of caustic soda and five of water. The composition is then mixed with half its weight of plaster of Parisand set firmly in halfto three-quarters of

an hour.

It is said to be of

great adhesive power, and not permeable to petroleum, a low conductor Zinc white, white of heat, and but superficially attacked by hot water.lead, or p