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Year 2 – Writing week beginning 01.06.20

Welcome to our writing journey…The Poetry Olympics!

Our writing journey will be based on the book ‘Olympic Poems’ by Brian Moses and Roger Stevens. Our writing journey is going to be covered over two weeks in order to make sure we really understand the patterns of the poems. Throughout the two weeks we will explore the poetry from the book and investigate different features that can be used to create poems. At the end of the two weeks we will be writing our own poems about The Olympics.

Like at school, we need to know what we are writing, who we are writing it for and why. Below is your writing journey explained.

Purpose: You are writing to entertain.

Audience: You will be writing to the Year 2 children.

Form: You will be writing a poem.

Effect: Your writing will need to entertain and interest your readers.

Monday 1st June 2020

LO: To build deeper understandings through research.

Before we begin to explore the poetry within the book ‘Olympic Poems’ I would first love you to investigate the Olympics. This will enable us to build deeper understandings about our topic and what we could use within our poems at the end of next week.

Below are website links where information can be found if you are able to access the internet.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z87tn39/articles/z36j7ty

https://www.activityvillage.co.uk/all-about-the-olympic-games

https://www.historyforkids.net/ancient-greek-olympics.html

https://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/sports/summerolympics.html

https://www.factmonster.com/sports/sports-section/olympics-fun-facts

https://kids.kiddle.co/Summer_Olympic_Games

https://www.olympic.org/sports

If you do not have access to the internet I have found some key facts and attached them below.

Tuesday 2nd June 2020

LO: To read and decode poetry.

Today you will be exploring the different poems from the book ‘Olympic Poems’. Your task will focus on reading the different poems within the book in order for you to read the varied styles of poetry that different authors create.

After you have read the different poems about the Olympics I want you to discuss what you notice about each of the poems. Does the poem have a title? Is there any rhyming words? Also I would like you to decide what your poem will be about. What do you like about the poem? What don’t you like?

Athlete

Fast runner

Never give upper

Hard trainer

Careful eater

Stop watcher

Dawn catcher

Muscle stretcher

Dream follower

Team member

Record maker

Gold winner

Roger Stevens

To Be an Olympic Athlete…

You need a lion’s heart

And a swift pair of feet,

to be a champion

Olympic athlete.

You need exercise,

so get off the settee,

jog in the park

instead of watching TV.

You need a fire in your eyes

that never goes out,

no room at all

for any moment of doubt.

You need a real hunger

to go out and win,

you need a resolve

to never give in.

You need to break through

that barrier of a pain,

and a mantra that tells you to

‘train, train, train’.

Then one day, who knows,

to the sound of applause,

you will stand on the steps

and the gold will be yours.

Brian Moses

Running the Marathon

I’m going to run the marathon,

wearing a diving suit,

strapped to a parachute.

With a cloak and staff like Noah,

pushing a garden mower.

In a ballet dancer’s tutu,

cracking a cowboy’s lasso.

Yes, I’m going to run the marathon,

inside a suit of armour,

leading a Tibetan llama.

As an ancient prince from Khartoum,

in a Loch Ness Monster costume.

As Adam running from Eve,

or a camel from Tel Aviv.

Yes, I’m going to run the marathon,

As a green an grotty ogre,

in an Imperial Roman toga.

As a bridegroom on his wedding day,

or someone dressed to play croquet.

In a dragon costume from China,

as a luxury ocean liner.

Yes, I’m going to run the marathon

and I want to get myself seen.

Although maybe, just maybe,

I think it might be best

to forget all these wacky ideas

and stick with shorts and vest!

Brian Moses

The Real Battle

On the school field

Or in the Olympic stadium

Your competitors smile

While plotting to beat you

But the real battle

Is in your head

Roger Stevens

Mark Spitz

Everyone remembers

the name Mark Spitz.

True American hero,

they loved him to bitz.

He broke word records

in a bit of a blitz.

Won seven gold medals

then called it quitz.

More than anyone else,

American or Britz.

Bit of an icon

was swimmer Mark Spitz.

Brian Moses

I Never Learned to Dive Like Dave

I never learned to dive like Dave,

I never learned the skill.

In fact I never learned to swim

and now I never will.

But Dave had a way with water

and Dave had a way with waves,

he understood the ebb and flow

of how the sea behaves.

And Dave showed all of Ramsgate

how diving should be done,

competitions entered,

medals and trophies won.

There on the high diving board

you’d see him strain for height,

then calmly jump, flip, rotate

and take his downward flight.

With scarcely a ripple showing

the water would welcome him in.

Dave was a hero to all of us,

an incentive to go out and win.

But I never learned to dive like Dave,

never for me the ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs’

as Dave stood balancing on the board,

arms reaching out to the stars.

Brian Moses

Challenge time: Vocabulary investigation.

If there are any words you do not understand I would like you to investigate the meaning of each of the words.

Here is a link to a website to help you find the definitions of the words you are finding tricky:

https://kids.wordsmyth.net/we/?ent=swimmer

Wednesday 3rd June 2020

LO: To identify rhyming words.

Today we will be exploring rhyming words and where we can find them in pieces of poetry. However we first need to understand what rhyming words are.

What are rhymes?

Words that rhyme have the same sound.

'Cheese' and 'peas' both have the same sound. You can write rhyming poems by using pairs or groups of words that use the same sounds.

If you have access to the internet here is a link to a video which helps explain rhymes: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zjhhvcw/articles/zqjgrdm

Task 1

Today we will be matching rhyming words in order to understand that rhyming words are words that have the same sound.

If you are finding it tricky to identify sounds, here is something to help you with your sounds.

If you found this too easy and would like a challenge try to come up with three of your own rhyming words for the objects below.

Challenge time: To identify rhyming words in poems from the book ‘Olympic Poems’.

Highlight the rhyming words in the poems from the book.

I Never Learned to Dive Like Dave

I never learned to dive like Dave,

I never learned the skill.

In fact I never learned to swim

and now I never will.

But Dave had a way with water

and Dave had a way with waves,

he understood the ebb and flow

of how the sea behaves.

And Dave showed all of Ramsgate

how diving should be done,

competitions entered,

medals and trophies won.

There on the high diving board

you’d see him strain for height,

then calmly jump, flip, rotate

and take his downward flight.

With scarcely a ripple showing

the water would welcome him in.

Dave was a hero to all of us,

an incentive to go out and win.

But I never learned to dive like Dave,

never for me the ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs’

as Dave stood balancing on the board,

arms reaching out to the stars.

Brian Moses

Athlete

Fast runner

Never give upper

Hard trainer

Careful eater

Stop watcher

Dawn catcher

Muscle stretcher

Dream follower

Team member

Record maker

Gold winner

Roger Stevens

Mark Spitz

Everyone remembers

the name Mark Spitz.

True American hero,

they loved him to bitz.

He broke word records

in a bit of a blitz.

Won seven gold medals

then called it quitz.

More than anyone else,

American or Britz.

Bit of an icon

was swimmer Mark Spitz.

Brian Moses

Thursday 4th June 2020

LO: To use and create rhymes.

Today we are going to carry on from yesterday and work to create our own rhymes using rhyming words. Before we can start we need to recap what rhyming words are.

Rhyming words are words that have the same sound as one another. For example:

Pen and hen are rhyming words because they share the sound ‘e’.

House and mouse are rhyming words because they share the