© F C B 0 6 Intermediate 1/2 English Literature: Poetry Unit

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Transcript of © F C B 0 6 Intermediate 1/2 English Literature: Poetry Unit

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F C B 0 6 Intermediate 1/2 English Literature: Poetry Unit Slide 2 F C B 0 6 The First World War lasted from 1914-1918. At first people were enthusiastic about it, thinking that it would not last very long. But as the war raged on, many people became quite disillusioned by it. The writer of this poem, although brave and patriotic, disapproved of the way the government was sending out young men to almost certain death a bloody and horrible death as you will see in the poem. Dont be put off by the Latin title. It means something like It is sweet and fitting to die for your country. Later in the poem, the writer says this is a Lie. Slide 3 F C B 0 6 For many people, Wilfred Owen born 1893 - is the greatest poet of WW1. Owen joined the army in 1915 and served as an Officer in the War. He was awarded the military cross for bravery in 1918 and was killed on November 4 th, one week before the armistice. Most of his poems were written in a short space of time in 1917 and 1918 and were published after Owens death. Almost all of Owens surviving poetry describes life as a soldier in the trenches. His poems show the harsh realities of war. Listen to the poem Slide 4 F C B 0 6 Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots But limped on, blood shod. All went lame; all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind. Some of the techniques used here: Simile Alliteration and onomatopoeia Word choice Sentence structure Vocabulary: Flares Fatigue Five-Nines Slide 5 F C B 0 6 Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! An ecstasy of fumbling, Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; But someone still was yelling out and stumbling, And floundring like a man in fire or lime... Dim, through the misty panes and thick, green light, As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. Vocabulary: Ecstasy Floundering Some of the techniques used here: Punctuation and sentence structure Capital letters Repetition Word choice and comparisons Slide 6 F C B 0 6 In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. Vocabulary: Guttering Some of the techniques used here: Word choice Sentence structure Slide 7 F C B 0 6 If in some smothering dreams you too could pace Behind the wagon that we flung him in, And watch the white eyes writhing in his face; His hanging face like a devils sick of sin; If you could hear at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues, - My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, That old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori. Vocabulary: Writhing Corrupted Obscene Cud Zest Ardent Some of the techniques used here: Word choice, tone and sound Simile Sentence structure Capital letter Directly addressing the reader Slide 8 F C B 0 6 Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs And towards our distant rest began to trudge. Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots But limped on, blood shod. All went lame; all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind. Some of the techniques used here: Simile Alliteration and onomatopoeia Word choice Sentence structure Vocabulary: Flares Fatigue Five-Nines Slide 9 F C B 0 6 Verse 1 1.What is being described in this verse (use your own words)? 2.Quote the similes from lines 1-2. Say how each is effective. 3.Quote examples of alliteration from lines 2 and 5. Are the sounds hard or soft, and how effective are they? 4.Comment on the phrase distant rest. 5.Quote 3 examples of metaphors used in the closing lines of this verse. Slide 10 F C B 0 6 Verse 1 1.What is being described in this verse (use your own words)? The men coming back from front line 2.Quote the similes from lines 1-2. Say how each is effective. like old beggars shows they are in a bad state and are old beyond their years. coughing like hags again shows they have been aged. 3.Quote examples of alliteration from lines 2 and 5. Are the sounds hard or soft, and how effective are they? knock kneed hard sounds, shows how they walk in fear and coldness. coughing cursed sound effect. men marched imitates sound of boots. 4.Comment on the phrase distant rest. Base seems really far away. They are exhausted and weary. 5.Quote 3 examples of metaphors used in the closing lines of this verse, drunk with fatigue, deaf, blood-shod, lame, blind Slide 11 F C B 0 6 Verse 1: Tops and Tails This verse describes how the men feel To recreate the unpleasant noises in the trenches. Sound effects are used in this verse To reinforce the soldiers poor physical condition. Words and images like blood shod and blind are used To make the soldiers sound old beyond their years. Similes are used in this verse After a long spell at the front line. Extension: ANNOTATE stanza 1 Slide 12 F C B 0 6 Verse 1: Tops and Tails This verse describes how the men feel To recreate the unpleasant noises in the trenches. Sound effects are used in this verse To reinforce the soldiers poor physical condition. Words and images like blood shod and blind are used To make the soldiers sound old beyond their years. Similes are used in this verse After a long spell at the front line. Extension: ANNOTATE stanza 1 Slide 13 F C B 0 6 Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! An ecstasy of fumbling, Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; But someone still was yelling out and stumbling, And floundring like a man in fire or lime... Dim, through the misty panes and thick, green light, As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. Vocabulary: Ecstasy Floundering Some of the techniques used here: Punctuation and sentence structure Capital letters Repetition Word choice and comparisons Slide 14 F C B 0 6 Verse 2 1.What takes the men by surprise (use your own words)? 2.Comment on the effect of the repetition, capital letters and exclamation marks. 3.What are the clumsy helmets, do you think? 4.There are a lot of ing words (present participles) in this verse. What is their effect? 5.Comment on the phrase just in time. 6.What effect does the word But have? 7.What is the gas compared to in this verse? 8.Quote an expression which reminds us that this was a real-life, personal experience of Owens. Slide 15 F C B 0 6 1.What takes the men by surprise (use your own words)? A gas shell falling into the trench. 2.Comment on the effect of the repetition, capital letters and exclamation marks. It shows that they are shouting in panic. It creates a sense of seriousness, of urgency and fear. 3.What are the clumsy helmets, do you think? The gas masks. 4.There are a lot of ing words (present participles) in this verse. What is their effect? The effect is it feels like its happening before your eyes right now. 5.Comment on the phrase just in time. They had to be very quick. It was a matter of life and death. It creates urgency and suspense. 6.What effect does the word But have? Fear someone has not been successful. 7.What is the gas compared to in this verse? green sea 8.Quote an expression which reminds us that this was a real-life, personal experience of Owens. I saw him Slide 16 F C B 0 6 Verse 2: Cloze Summary The second section _____ describes a _____ attack, giving an eyewitness account of a soldiers death. The section starts with a _____ of warning Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! This starts to build _____ as the _____ marks, repetition and _____ speech add a sense of panic and foreboding. Upon this warning, the soldiers fumble to fit the clumsy helmets just in time. Such is their _____ that they cant even work their fingers _____. Just in time makes us think that it was a close thing. However, the first word - but - in the next line dashes these hopes. The expression as under a green sea I saw him drowning is the first time in the poem Owen has referred to _____ as I. By using I rather than we its almost as if Owen takes the full _____ upon himself, even though there was nothing he or the others could do. gasresponsibility tensioncryproperly directvividlyhimselfexhaustionexclamation Slide 17 F C B 0 6 In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning. Vocabulary: Guttering Some of the techniques used here: Word choice Sentence structure Slide 18 F C B 0 6 Verse 3 1.Has Owen recovered from his experience of watching the man die? Justify you answer, using quotations and commenting on any techniques used. (You should at least refer to word choice and the use of a list.) Slide 19 F C B 0 6 Verse 3 Owen probably felt a mixture of emotions during this experience. Look at the list of feelings below, justifying how each one could be true. The first one has been done for you. FeelingWhy he might feel this way Guilt The man was under his command Anger Sympathy Relief Slide 20 F C B 0 6 If in some smothering dreams you too could pace Behind the wagon that we flung him in, And watch the white eyes writhing in his face; His hanging face like a devils sick of sin; If you could hear at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues, - My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, That old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori. Vocabulary: Writhing Corrupted Obscene Cud Zest Ardent Some of the techniques used here: Word choice, tone and sound Simile Sentence structure Capital letter Directly addressing the reader Slide 21 F C B 0 6 Verse 4 1.Quote some words or phrases where Owen refers to the reader d